Kiss Me Again (1925)

Comedy | 1 August 1925

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HISTORY

Modern sources indicated that Kiss Me Again was based on the 1880 play Divorçons by Victorien Sardou and Émile de Najac. However, the 1925 Library of Congress copyright for Kiss Me Again gave sole story credit to Hans Kraly. Contemporary sources did not reference the Sardou and de Najac play, and the 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World reported that Kiss Me Again was an original story written by director Ernst Lubitsch and Hans Kraly. Years later, Lubitsch directed That Uncertain Feeling (1941, see entry), which was based on Divorçons. According to the 15 Dec 1940 NYT, Lubitsch and Sol Lesser had purchased film rights to Divorçons at that time.
The 10 Jun 1925 Var stated that Warner Bros. had named their picture after the hit song “Kiss Me Again” that was featured in the 1905 operetta, Mlle. Modiste, written by Henry Blossom and Victor Herbert. Although the 1931 First National Pictures, Inc. release, Kiss Me Again, was based on the operetta, that picture bares no other connection to the Lubitsch film.
       Referring to Kiss Me Again, the 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World indicated that principal photography had recently begun on the yet-to-be-titled Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., release, with filming taking place at Warner Bros. Studios in Hollywood, CA. Marie Prevost and Monte Blue were cast in the lead roles.
       On 31 Jan 1925, Moving Picture World stated that Clara Bow, John Roche, and Willard Louis would join the cast. According to the 18 Apr 1925 Moving Picture ... More Less

Modern sources indicated that Kiss Me Again was based on the 1880 play Divorçons by Victorien Sardou and Émile de Najac. However, the 1925 Library of Congress copyright for Kiss Me Again gave sole story credit to Hans Kraly. Contemporary sources did not reference the Sardou and de Najac play, and the 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World reported that Kiss Me Again was an original story written by director Ernst Lubitsch and Hans Kraly. Years later, Lubitsch directed That Uncertain Feeling (1941, see entry), which was based on Divorçons. According to the 15 Dec 1940 NYT, Lubitsch and Sol Lesser had purchased film rights to Divorçons at that time.
The 10 Jun 1925 Var stated that Warner Bros. had named their picture after the hit song “Kiss Me Again” that was featured in the 1905 operetta, Mlle. Modiste, written by Henry Blossom and Victor Herbert. Although the 1931 First National Pictures, Inc. release, Kiss Me Again, was based on the operetta, that picture bares no other connection to the Lubitsch film.
       Referring to Kiss Me Again, the 24 Jan 1925 Moving Picture World indicated that principal photography had recently begun on the yet-to-be-titled Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., release, with filming taking place at Warner Bros. Studios in Hollywood, CA. Marie Prevost and Monte Blue were cast in the lead roles.
       On 31 Jan 1925, Moving Picture World stated that Clara Bow, John Roche, and Willard Louis would join the cast. According to the 18 Apr 1925 Moving Picture World, the five performers made up the entirety of the cast.
       The 7 Mar 1925 Moving Picture World reported that principal photography would be completed within a few days, and the 25 Mar 1925 Var confirmed that production had finished. However, the 18 Apr 1925 Moving Picture World announced that final scenes had been filmed early that week and the picture was currently being edited.
       The 16 May 1925 Moving Picture World noted that a screening was held that week for critics at the Writers Club in Hollywood, CA, where high praise was given to Ernst Lubitsch. LAExam reporter, Florence Lawrence deemed the picture “the finest directorial effort that has ever been photographed.”
       According to the 10 Jun 1925 Var, Kiss Me Again held its world premiere that week at the Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, CA, billed with Max Fisher and His California Orchestra. The New York City opening was held at the Piccadilly Theatre on 1 Aug 1925, as indicated in the 5 Aug 1925 Var review, which stated that the picture was “well acted, delightfully directed and edited without a wasted foot of film.”
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1925 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the 7 Feb 1930 FD.
       For information on other adaptations of the Victorien Sardou-Émile de Najac play (also known as Cyprienne), see the entry for the 1918 Famous Players-Lasky film Let's Get a Divorce, directed by Charles Giblyn and starring Billie Burke and John Miltern. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
22 Aug 1925
p. 50.
Film Daily
9 Aug 1925
p. 7.
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 8.
Moving Picture World
24 Jan 1925
p. 386.
Moving Picture World
31 Jan 1925
p. 194.
Moving Picture World
7 Mar 1925
p. 76.
Moving Picture World
18 Apr 1925
p. 715.
Moving Picture World
16 May 1925
p. 357.
Moving Picture World
15 Aug 1925
p. 736.
New York Times
3 Aug 1925
p. 10.
Variety
25 Mar 1925
p. 26.
Variety
10 Jun 1925
p. 21, 26.
Variety
5 Aug 1925
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Divorçons by Victorien Sardou and Émile de Najac (Paris, 6 Dec 1880).
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 August 1925
Premiere Information:
Los angeles premiere at the Forum Theatre: week of 10 June 1925
New York opening at the Piccadilly Theatre: 1 August 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 April 1925
Copyright Number:
LP21387
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,722
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Gaston Fleury's wife, Loulou, takes a perfunctory interest in music but a deeper one in a musician named Maurice. Although Gaston has no intention of releasing his wife into the hands of Maurice, he feigns willingness to give Loulou a divorce. Loulou then becomes bored with Maurice, and clever maneuvering on the part of Gaston brings her to want desperately a reconciliation with him. He happily fulfills her ... +


Gaston Fleury's wife, Loulou, takes a perfunctory interest in music but a deeper one in a musician named Maurice. Although Gaston has no intention of releasing his wife into the hands of Maurice, he feigns willingness to give Loulou a divorce. Loulou then becomes bored with Maurice, and clever maneuvering on the part of Gaston brings her to want desperately a reconciliation with him. He happily fulfills her wish. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.