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HISTORY

According to the 1 Feb 1928 Var, principal photography had begun at Universal Pictures Studio lot in Universal City, near Hollywood, CA.
The 18 Feb 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World production chart listed a 30 Jan 1928 start date.
       The 8 Feb 1928 Var reported an expected completion date of 20 Feb 1928, marking the last film to shoot at Universal Studios before a ten-to-twelve week scheduled break in company productions.
       The 16 Feb 1928 FD announced that Lonesome director Paul Fejos would utilize a new camera invention to aid in stabilization for tracking shots, which was reportedly small enough to fit into narrow spaces. Known as a “perambulator,” the apparatus was invented by Carl Laemmle, Jr., who received a production supervisor credit on the picture.
       On 6 Mar 1928, FD stated that principal photography had been completed.
       Despite the apparent Coney Island, NY, locations, recreations of roller coasters and other carnival attractions were built on the Universal lot, according to a still image and caption in the 7 Apr 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World.
       According to the 10 Oct 1928 Var review, Universal had promoted the film as their first feature-length “talkie,” but, as noted in the Dec 1928 Motion Picture Magazine review, Lonesome contained only three talking sequences, although music and sound effects were synchronized throughout.
       Several reviews, including the 24 Jun 1928 FD, noted the simple plot line, but praised Paul Fejos’s “excellent” direction for making the “human” story a standout.
       The 3 Apr 1929 Var indicated that a ... More Less

According to the 1 Feb 1928 Var, principal photography had begun at Universal Pictures Studio lot in Universal City, near Hollywood, CA.
The 18 Feb 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World production chart listed a 30 Jan 1928 start date.
       The 8 Feb 1928 Var reported an expected completion date of 20 Feb 1928, marking the last film to shoot at Universal Studios before a ten-to-twelve week scheduled break in company productions.
       The 16 Feb 1928 FD announced that Lonesome director Paul Fejos would utilize a new camera invention to aid in stabilization for tracking shots, which was reportedly small enough to fit into narrow spaces. Known as a “perambulator,” the apparatus was invented by Carl Laemmle, Jr., who received a production supervisor credit on the picture.
       On 6 Mar 1928, FD stated that principal photography had been completed.
       Despite the apparent Coney Island, NY, locations, recreations of roller coasters and other carnival attractions were built on the Universal lot, according to a still image and caption in the 7 Apr 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World.
       According to the 10 Oct 1928 Var review, Universal had promoted the film as their first feature-length “talkie,” but, as noted in the Dec 1928 Motion Picture Magazine review, Lonesome contained only three talking sequences, although music and sound effects were synchronized throughout.
       Several reviews, including the 24 Jun 1928 FD, noted the simple plot line, but praised Paul Fejos’s “excellent” direction for making the “human” story a standout.
       The 3 Apr 1929 Var indicated that a sequel was being planned by Universal, which Fejos would also direct. However, this project never came to fruition.
       Various modern sources indicated that the original print negative for Lonesome was restored several times since its creation, most recently in 2012 by the Criterion Collection. Criterion released a digital restoration on “Blu-ray” DVD that featured an “uncompressed monaural soundtrack,” and had color graded the black and white film, including its brief color tinted sequences. Two additional films directed by Paul Fejos in 1929, The Last Performance, and Broadway, (see entries), were included among the DVD’s bonus features. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
18 Feb 1928
p. 33.
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
7 Apr 1928
p. 21.
Film Daily
16 Feb 1928
p. 6.
Film Daily
6 Mar 1928
p. 4.
Film Daily
24 Jun 1928
p. 5.
Film Spectator
23 Jun 1928
pp. 16-17.
Motion Picture Magazine
Dec 1928
p. 68.
New York Times
2 Oct 1928
p. 23.
Photoplay
Jul 1928
p. 56.
Variety
1 Feb 1928
p. 61.
Variety
8 Feb 1928
p. 8.
Variety
10 Oct 1928
p. 15.
Variety
3 Apr 1929
p. 35.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Prod supv
WRITERS
Story
Dial
Titles
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 September 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 30 September 1928
Production Date:
30 January--6 March 1928
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
20 June 1928
Copyright Number:
LP25404
Physical Properties:
Silent with sound sequences
Also si, ca20 Jun 1928; 6,142 or 6,193 ft.; talking seq and sd eff by Movietone
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,761 , 6,785
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Life in New York City is a humdrum affair for Mary, a switchboard operator, and Jim, a drill press operator, two lonely people who are unaware that they live in the same boardinghouse. Following a festive crowd to Coney Island, they meet on the beach and experience love at first sight. On a roller coaster they become separated, a fire breaks out, and Mary faints. In an effort to get to Mary, whose name he does not know, Jim is stopped by a policeman and taken to the station. By the time he is released, Mary has disappeared. Despondent, each wanders back to the boardinghouse, where they gleefully discover they are ... +


Life in New York City is a humdrum affair for Mary, a switchboard operator, and Jim, a drill press operator, two lonely people who are unaware that they live in the same boardinghouse. Following a festive crowd to Coney Island, they meet on the beach and experience love at first sight. On a roller coaster they become separated, a fire breaks out, and Mary faints. In an effort to get to Mary, whose name he does not know, Jim is stopped by a policeman and taken to the station. By the time he is released, Mary has disappeared. Despondent, each wanders back to the boardinghouse, where they gleefully discover they are neighbors. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.