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On 10 Feb 1923, Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Harry Rapf would produce a film version of Kathleen Norris’s novel, Lucretia Lombard, for Warner Bros. Seven weeks later, a 30 Mar 1923 FD news item indicated that writer Sada Cowan had completed the script. A 5 May 1923 Exhibitors Herald news brief anticipated that production would begin “soon.” Three months later, an item in the Aug 1923 AmCin indicated that cinematographer David Abel was about to begin filming the Warner Bros. picture. However, whether or not Abel actually served as director of photography on Lucretia Lombard remains unknown.
       A 16 Sep 1923 FD news item noted that actors Monte Blue and Irene Rich had recently completed filming exteriors in Big Bear, CA. Sometime around the start of production, Warner Bros. changed the picture’s title to Loveless Marriages. However, within a matter of weeks, the title reverted back to Lucretia Lombard, as noted in a 6 Oct 1923 Moving Picture World announcement that the film was nearing completion at Warner Studios.
       According to a 29 Oct 1923 FD article, Lucretia Lombard was scheduled for release on 18 Nov 1923. Various contemporary reviews, including the 15 Dec 1923 Exhibitors Herald and 22 Dec 1923 Moving Picture World, remarked on the unusual strategy of releasing the film under two titles: Lucretia Lombard and Flaming Passion. Exhibitors were given press materials to complement either ... More Less

On 10 Feb 1923, Exhibitors Trade Review announced that Harry Rapf would produce a film version of Kathleen Norris’s novel, Lucretia Lombard, for Warner Bros. Seven weeks later, a 30 Mar 1923 FD news item indicated that writer Sada Cowan had completed the script. A 5 May 1923 Exhibitors Herald news brief anticipated that production would begin “soon.” Three months later, an item in the Aug 1923 AmCin indicated that cinematographer David Abel was about to begin filming the Warner Bros. picture. However, whether or not Abel actually served as director of photography on Lucretia Lombard remains unknown.
       A 16 Sep 1923 FD news item noted that actors Monte Blue and Irene Rich had recently completed filming exteriors in Big Bear, CA. Sometime around the start of production, Warner Bros. changed the picture’s title to Loveless Marriages. However, within a matter of weeks, the title reverted back to Lucretia Lombard, as noted in a 6 Oct 1923 Moving Picture World announcement that the film was nearing completion at Warner Studios.
       According to a 29 Oct 1923 FD article, Lucretia Lombard was scheduled for release on 18 Nov 1923. Various contemporary reviews, including the 15 Dec 1923 Exhibitors Herald and 22 Dec 1923 Moving Picture World, remarked on the unusual strategy of releasing the film under two titles: Lucretia Lombard and Flaming Passion. Exhibitors were given press materials to complement either title. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Aug 1923
p. 26.
Exhibitors Herald
5 May 1923
p. 54.
Exhibitors Herald
15 Dec1923
p. 45.
Exhibitors Trade Review
10 Feb 1923
p. 555.
Film Daily
30 Mar 1923
p. 5.
Film Daily
19 Aug 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
16 Sep 1923
p. 11.
Film Daily
30 Sep 1923.
---
Film Daily
29 Oct 1923
p. 1, 6.
Moving Picture World
25 Aug 1923
p. 660.
Moving Picture World
6 Oct 1923
p. 512.
Moving Picture World
22 Dec 1923
p. 707.
Variety
20 Dec 1923.
---
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Flaming Passion
Loveless Marriages
Release Date:
1923
Premiere Information:
18 November or 8 December 1923
Production Date:
September--early October 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers Pictures
Copyright Date:
13 November 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19605
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,500
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Lucretia Morgan marries elderly Sir Allen Lombard, who becomes a dissolute, chair-ridden drug addict and dies after a few years from an overdose of narcotics. She falls in love with District Attorney Stephen Winship, who reciprocates but, at his father's request, marries Mimi, ward of the Winships. Fate brings the two (Stephen and Lucretia) together after a "series of stirring sequences" culminating in Mimi's death when a dam bursts during a forest ... +


Lucretia Morgan marries elderly Sir Allen Lombard, who becomes a dissolute, chair-ridden drug addict and dies after a few years from an overdose of narcotics. She falls in love with District Attorney Stephen Winship, who reciprocates but, at his father's request, marries Mimi, ward of the Winships. Fate brings the two (Stephen and Lucretia) together after a "series of stirring sequences" culminating in Mimi's death when a dam bursts during a forest fire. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.