Oh, Kay! (1928)

63 mins | Romantic comedy | 26 August 1928

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HISTORY

According to copyright records, this film was seven reels in length and the title was Oh Kay! without a comma. The Var review lists the film's title without any punctuation.
       The 31 Oct 1927 FD announced that First National Pictures, Inc. purchased film rights to the 1926 book and stage musical, Oh, Kay! by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Howard Dietz. Colleen Moore was set to star in the adaptation. Three months later, the 26 Jan 1928 issue named Mervyn LeRoy as the director.
       The 12 May 1928 Motion Picture News reported that production was expected to begin after Moore returned from a Hawaiian vacation in mid-May 1928, and listed a 26 Aug 1928 release date.
       On 16 Jun 1928, Motion Picture News indicated that production had recently begun at the First National Studios in Burbank, CA.
       According to the 14 Jul 1928 Motion Picture News, principal photography was completed on 8 Jul 1928. The 11 Jul 1928 Var reported that the company had filmed exteriors on a beach in Santa Barbara, CA, where several hundred square feet of sand had been painted yellow to reduce the sun's glare.
       The 27 Feb 1928 FD and the 25 Jul 1928 Var added Sam Hardy, John Northpole, Jack Wise, and Jack Herrick to the cast, and the 3 Jun 1928 FD listed Rollie Asher as a comedy writer. Although the 18 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review stated that George Marion, Jr. would write the ... More Less

According to copyright records, this film was seven reels in length and the title was Oh Kay! without a comma. The Var review lists the film's title without any punctuation.
       The 31 Oct 1927 FD announced that First National Pictures, Inc. purchased film rights to the 1926 book and stage musical, Oh, Kay! by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse with music by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Howard Dietz. Colleen Moore was set to star in the adaptation. Three months later, the 26 Jan 1928 issue named Mervyn LeRoy as the director.
       The 12 May 1928 Motion Picture News reported that production was expected to begin after Moore returned from a Hawaiian vacation in mid-May 1928, and listed a 26 Aug 1928 release date.
       On 16 Jun 1928, Motion Picture News indicated that production had recently begun at the First National Studios in Burbank, CA.
       According to the 14 Jul 1928 Motion Picture News, principal photography was completed on 8 Jul 1928. The 11 Jul 1928 Var reported that the company had filmed exteriors on a beach in Santa Barbara, CA, where several hundred square feet of sand had been painted yellow to reduce the sun's glare.
       The 27 Feb 1928 FD and the 25 Jul 1928 Var added Sam Hardy, John Northpole, Jack Wise, and Jack Herrick to the cast, and the 3 Jun 1928 FD listed Rollie Asher as a comedy writer. Although the 18 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review stated that George Marion, Jr. would write the titles, onscreen credit went to P. G. Wodehouse.
       The 26 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review reported that the picture was currently "in the cutting room."
       The 28 Jul 1928 Motion Picture News confirmed a national release date of 26 Aug 1928, which appeared to be the date of the Los Angeles, CA, opening at Loew's State Theatre, as indicated in the 1 Sep 1928 issue.
       Oh, Kay! opened in New York City on 25 Aug 1928, at the Mark Strand Theatre, according to the 29 Aug 1928 Var review, which deemed the picture a "mild comedy" with "no howl but enough snickers to see it through."
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Daily Review
18 Jul 1928
p. 4.
Exhibitors Daily Review
26 Jul 1928
p. 5.
Exhibitors Daily Review
10 Aug 1928
p. 4.
Film Daily
31 Oct 1927
p. 4.
Film Daily
26 Jan 1928
p. 7.
Film Daily
27 Feb 1928
p. 4.
Film Daily
3 Jun 1928
p. 12.
Film Daily
17 Jun 1928
p. 9.
Film Daily
2 Sep 1928.
---
Motion Picture News
11 Feb 1928
p. 470.
Motion Picture News
12 May 1928
p. 1575, 1602.
Motion Picture News
2 Jun 1928
p. 1893.
Motion Picture News
16 Jun 1928
p. 2024, 2051.
Motion Picture News
14 Jul 1928
p. 140.
Motion Picture News
28 Jul 1928
p. 268, 305.
Motion Picture News
1 Sep 1928
p. 733, 737.
New York Times
27 Aug 1928
p. 23.
Variety
11 Jul 1928
p. 5, 21.
Variety
25 Jul 1928
p. 45.
Variety
29 Aug 1928
p. 28.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Oh, Kay! book by Guy Bolton and P. G. Wodehouse, music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin and Howard Dietz (New York, 8 Nov 1926).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Oh Kay
Release Date:
26 August 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 25 August 1928
Los Angeles opening: late August 1928
Production Date:
June--8 July 1928
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 August 1928
Copyright Number:
LP25536
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
63
Length(in feet):
6,100
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the eve of her wedding to the insipid Lord Braggot, Lady Kay Rutfield seeks solace in a solitary sail on her sloop. A storm blows up, and Kay is rescued by a passing rumrunner bound for the United States. The ship anchors in Long Island Sound, and Kay makes her escape, taking refuge in the deserted mansion of wealthy Jimmy Winter. That evening, Jimmy, who is to be wed on the following day, returns home unexpectedly, and Kay (in order to elude a detective named Jansen, who has mistaken her for a bootlegger) persuades him to let her pose for a night as his wife. Shorty, a bootlegger, has hidden some hooch in the basement and, to protect it, passes himself off as the new butler. The night of the following day finds Jimmy and Kay engaged, and Shorty long gone with his illegal ... +


On the eve of her wedding to the insipid Lord Braggot, Lady Kay Rutfield seeks solace in a solitary sail on her sloop. A storm blows up, and Kay is rescued by a passing rumrunner bound for the United States. The ship anchors in Long Island Sound, and Kay makes her escape, taking refuge in the deserted mansion of wealthy Jimmy Winter. That evening, Jimmy, who is to be wed on the following day, returns home unexpectedly, and Kay (in order to elude a detective named Jansen, who has mistaken her for a bootlegger) persuades him to let her pose for a night as his wife. Shorty, a bootlegger, has hidden some hooch in the basement and, to protect it, passes himself off as the new butler. The night of the following day finds Jimmy and Kay engaged, and Shorty long gone with his illegal swill. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.