Hollywood Canteen (1944)

124 or 126 mins | Musical | 31 December 1944

Director:

Delmer Daves

Writer:

Delmer Daves

Producer:

Alex Gottlieb

Cinematographer:

Bert Glennon

Editor:

Christian Nyby

Production Designer:

Leo Kuter

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The real Hollywood Canteen was started by John Garfield, Canteen vice-president, and Bette Davis, president. Located on Cahuenga Blvd. near Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, CA, it opened on 3 Oct 1942. According to contemporary news items, the film began production in Nov 1943, but a dispute between Warner Bros. and the Screen Actors Guild caused the production to be temporarily suspended. SAG rules stipulated that each of the actors and actresses be paid full salaries for their appearance in the film, even if that appearance was very brief. Warner Bros. stopped filming on 22 Dec 1943 and demanded a public apology from the Guild. The studio alleged that the Guild's complaint violated the original studio-guild contract by, among other things, placing players in jeopardy and indirectly running counter to the national wage stabilization program. The Guild responded by stating that the union would "waive application of the rule to such players as voluntarily wish to play in the Warner production, but that it would apply the rule for the protection of any player not wishing to play in the picture or against whom pressure to play might be made on a 'patriotic' basis." When the studio brought suit against the Guild, it responded, "The real issue in this suit is not whether Warner Bros. can make Hollywood Canteen but whether the Guild has the right to enforce rules governing the conduct of its members." By the end of Apr 1944, the suit was dismissed after an out-of-court agreement in which the Guild agreed that a week's pro-rated salary was a fair minimum for freelance actors who usually work on a "per-picture" ... More Less

The real Hollywood Canteen was started by John Garfield, Canteen vice-president, and Bette Davis, president. Located on Cahuenga Blvd. near Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood, CA, it opened on 3 Oct 1942. According to contemporary news items, the film began production in Nov 1943, but a dispute between Warner Bros. and the Screen Actors Guild caused the production to be temporarily suspended. SAG rules stipulated that each of the actors and actresses be paid full salaries for their appearance in the film, even if that appearance was very brief. Warner Bros. stopped filming on 22 Dec 1943 and demanded a public apology from the Guild. The studio alleged that the Guild's complaint violated the original studio-guild contract by, among other things, placing players in jeopardy and indirectly running counter to the national wage stabilization program. The Guild responded by stating that the union would "waive application of the rule to such players as voluntarily wish to play in the Warner production, but that it would apply the rule for the protection of any player not wishing to play in the picture or against whom pressure to play might be made on a 'patriotic' basis." When the studio brought suit against the Guild, it responded, "The real issue in this suit is not whether Warner Bros. can make Hollywood Canteen but whether the Guild has the right to enforce rules governing the conduct of its members." By the end of Apr 1944, the suit was dismissed after an out-of-court agreement in which the Guild agreed that a week's pro-rated salary was a fair minimum for freelance actors who usually work on a "per-picture" basis. Other studios refused to loan their players to Warner Bros. under these terms. A NYT article dated 30 Apr 1944 notes that nine similar "all-star" films had been planned by other studios, but were dropped before the agreement was announced. The film resumed shooting in Jun 1944 using Warner Bros. contract players.
       Other HR news items add the following information about the production: Warner Bros. developed new recording and playback equipment that was used for the first time during the making of this film. The equipment included a new, more accurate cueing device and resulted in less feedback and distortion. Scenes were shot on location at the Veterans Administration Hospital on Sawtelle Blvd., in the Bel-Air Estates, at the Farmer's Market and on the Sunset Strip. Forty percent of the film's gross receipts were to be donated to the Hollywood Canteen. According to modern sources, this film was one of Warner Bros. top money makers of the year. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Sound Recording, Best Scoring of a Musical Picture and Best Song ("Sweet Dreams Sweetheart"). Hollywood Canteen marked the film debut of stage actress Joan McCracken. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
9 Dec 1944.
---
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1944.
---
Daily Variety
24-Jan-44
---
Daily Variety
27 Jan 1944.
---
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1944.
---
Daily Variety
5 Dec 44
p. 3, 7
Film Daily
5 Dec 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Citizen-News
27 Jan 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 43
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
18 Nov 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Nov 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 44
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Feb 1944.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 May 44
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jun 44
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 44
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Dec 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 44
p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
22 Dec 1943.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Jan 1944.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Jan 1944.
---
Los Angeles Times
8 Feb 1944.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
9 Dec 44
p. 2213.
New York Times
2 Jan 1944.
---
New York Times
30 Apr 1944.
---
New York Times
9 Jun 1944.
---
New York Times
16 Dec 44
p. 19.
Variety
6 Dec 44
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros.--First National Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Matte paintings
Props
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus adpt
SOUND
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
DANCE
Mus nos created and dir by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
Unit mgr
Research dir
Research asst
Best boy
SOURCES
MUSIC
"The Bee" by Franz Schubert
"Souvenir," composer undetermined.
SONGS
"Don't Fence Me In," music and lyrics by Cole Porter
"Sweet Dreams Sweetheart," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and M. K. Jerome
"You Can Always Tell a Yank," music and lyrics by E. Y. Harburg and Burton Lane
+
SONGS
"Don't Fence Me In," music and lyrics by Cole Porter
"Sweet Dreams Sweetheart," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and M. K. Jerome
"You Can Always Tell a Yank," music and lyrics by E. Y. Harburg and Burton Lane
"We're Having a Baby," music and lyrics by Harold Adamson and Vernon Duke
"What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life," music and lyrics by Ted Koehler and Burton Lane
"The General Jumped at Dawn," music and lyrics by Larry Neill and Jim Mundy
"Getting Corns for My Country," music and lyrics by Jean Barry, Leah Worth and Dick Charles
"Voodoo Moon," music and lyrics by Obdulio Morales, Julio Blanco and Marion Sunshine
"Tumbling Tumbleweeds," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 December 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 Dec 1944
Production Date:
5 Jun--31 Aug 1944
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 January 1945
Copyright Number:
LP13034
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
124 or 126
Length(in feet):
11,155
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9819
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Slim Green, a corporal stationed in the South Pacific, is enamored of actress Joan Leslie. After he is injured in battle, he and his pal, Sergeant Nolan, are sent to Hollywood, California for rest and recreation before they ship out again. When Slim mentions his desire to see movie stars, he is directed to the Hollywood Canteen, a gathering place for soldiers that is run by motion picture actors and actresses. Slim is impressed when he learns that all the entertainment and food is provided free of cost to servicemen and women. Learning that Slim has a crush on Joan Leslie, canteen president Bette Davis and Jane Wyman arrange for the two to meet. The next day, Nolan finds it hard to believe Slim's account of his experience at the canteen. He accompanies his friend to see things for himself and is impressed by the friendliness of the stars. Slim and Nolan continue their sightseeing the following day and accidentally encounter Joan at the Farmer's Market. That night, Slim becomes the millionth serviceman to come to the canteen and is awarded a luxury hotel suite, a car, a visit to a movie studio and a date with his favorite actress. Slim invites Nolan to share his suite and asks Joan to be his date. When Slim takes Joan home, the two sit in the backyard and talk about their lives. The next day, Slim and Nolan visit the Warner Bros. studio and Slim has dinner with Joan and her parents. Before Slim leaves town to return to the war zone, he makes a speech to the servicemen at the ... +


Slim Green, a corporal stationed in the South Pacific, is enamored of actress Joan Leslie. After he is injured in battle, he and his pal, Sergeant Nolan, are sent to Hollywood, California for rest and recreation before they ship out again. When Slim mentions his desire to see movie stars, he is directed to the Hollywood Canteen, a gathering place for soldiers that is run by motion picture actors and actresses. Slim is impressed when he learns that all the entertainment and food is provided free of cost to servicemen and women. Learning that Slim has a crush on Joan Leslie, canteen president Bette Davis and Jane Wyman arrange for the two to meet. The next day, Nolan finds it hard to believe Slim's account of his experience at the canteen. He accompanies his friend to see things for himself and is impressed by the friendliness of the stars. Slim and Nolan continue their sightseeing the following day and accidentally encounter Joan at the Farmer's Market. That night, Slim becomes the millionth serviceman to come to the canteen and is awarded a luxury hotel suite, a car, a visit to a movie studio and a date with his favorite actress. Slim invites Nolan to share his suite and asks Joan to be his date. When Slim takes Joan home, the two sit in the backyard and talk about their lives. The next day, Slim and Nolan visit the Warner Bros. studio and Slim has dinner with Joan and her parents. Before Slim leaves town to return to the war zone, he makes a speech to the servicemen at the canteen, honoring all branches of the service and all the allies for their part in the fight. Joan has promised to take Slim to the train, but on the way to pick him up, she runs out of gas. When she does not arrive on time, Slim writes her a note, thanking her for a wonderful weekend. At the last minute, Joan arrives at the train station, and kisses Slim goodbye. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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