Passion Flower (1930)

78 mins | Drama | 10 December 1930

Writer:

Martin Flavin

Cinematographer:

Harold Rosson

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The 26 Mar 1930 Var announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had purchased screen rights to Kathleen Norris’s 1930 novel, Passion Flower. The novel was reportedly serialized prior to publication in book form in Delineator (Mar--Sep 1929).
       On 20 Apr 1930, FD indicated that Delores Del Rio was favored for the lead role, and George Fitzmaurice would direct, but neither remained with the project.
       The 26 Apr 1930 Motion Picture News noted a Jul 1930 start date and the 9 May 1930 FD announced William de Mille as the director. However, principal photography began on 18 Aug 1930, according to the 30 Aug 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World production chart.
       The 16 Jun 1930 Var stated that Russell Birdwell contributed to the “screen treatment,” but the writer was not credited elsewhere.
       As of 23 Jul 1930, M-G-M was still searching for a lead actress, according to that day’s Var. Greta Garbo and Katherine Cornell had both reportedly turned down offers to star in Passion Flower. The 13 Aug 1930 Var reported that Kay Francis and Leila Hyams had been cast as the female leads, but Hyams was later replaced by Kay Johnson.
       Passion Flower opened at New York City’s Capitol Theatre on 10 Dec 1930, as noted in the 24 Dec 1930 Var review.
       Both the 21 Dec 1930 FD and the Var reviews complained about the “sluggish” pace of the film, but praised the “high grade” ... More Less

The 26 Mar 1930 Var announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had purchased screen rights to Kathleen Norris’s 1930 novel, Passion Flower. The novel was reportedly serialized prior to publication in book form in Delineator (Mar--Sep 1929).
       On 20 Apr 1930, FD indicated that Delores Del Rio was favored for the lead role, and George Fitzmaurice would direct, but neither remained with the project.
       The 26 Apr 1930 Motion Picture News noted a Jul 1930 start date and the 9 May 1930 FD announced William de Mille as the director. However, principal photography began on 18 Aug 1930, according to the 30 Aug 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World production chart.
       The 16 Jun 1930 Var stated that Russell Birdwell contributed to the “screen treatment,” but the writer was not credited elsewhere.
       As of 23 Jul 1930, M-G-M was still searching for a lead actress, according to that day’s Var. Greta Garbo and Katherine Cornell had both reportedly turned down offers to star in Passion Flower. The 13 Aug 1930 Var reported that Kay Francis and Leila Hyams had been cast as the female leads, but Hyams was later replaced by Kay Johnson.
       Passion Flower opened at New York City’s Capitol Theatre on 10 Dec 1930, as noted in the 24 Dec 1930 Var review.
       Both the 21 Dec 1930 FD and the Var reviews complained about the “sluggish” pace of the film, but praised the “high grade” actors. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald World
25 Oct 1930
p. 42.
Exhibitors Herald-World
30 Aug 1930
p. 34.
Film Daily
20 Apr 1930
p. 5.
Film Daily
9 May 1930
p. 8.
Film Daily
19 May 1930
p. 8.
Film Daily
21 Dec 1930
p. 10.
Life
9 Jan 1931
p. 22.
Motion Picture News
26 Apr 1930
p. 39.
New York Times
22 Dec 1930
p. 16.
Variety
26 Mar 1930
p. 6.
Variety
18 Jun 1930
p. 50.
Variety
23 Jul 1930
p. 17.
Variety
13 Aug 1930
p. 2.
Variety
24 Dec 1930
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Addl dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Passion Flower by Kathleen Norris (New York, 1930).
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 December 1930
Premiere Information:
New York opening at the Capitol Theatre: 10 December 1930
Production Date:
began 18 August 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 December 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1791
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
7,171
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Two cousins, Dulce and Cassy (Katherine), marry into differing stations in life: Dulce weds Morado, a wealthy Spanish aristocrat, and Cassy falls in love with Dan Wallace, the family chauffeur. Cassy's father orders them to leave his home, and they are married at Don Morado's estate. Dan refuses Morado's offer of a farm as a wedding gift, preferring to make his own way, but after 5 years he fails to rise further than a stevedore, while Cassy bears him two children and is ever faithful and loving. Finally, he accepts Morado's offer, and they take along with them their former landlady and nurse, Mrs. Harney. Against his better judgment, Dan falls in love with Dulce; and when Morado dies, the two of them go to Paris. As Dan is about to divorce his wife, he is conscience-striken by memories of his family and returns to ... +


Two cousins, Dulce and Cassy (Katherine), marry into differing stations in life: Dulce weds Morado, a wealthy Spanish aristocrat, and Cassy falls in love with Dan Wallace, the family chauffeur. Cassy's father orders them to leave his home, and they are married at Don Morado's estate. Dan refuses Morado's offer of a farm as a wedding gift, preferring to make his own way, but after 5 years he fails to rise further than a stevedore, while Cassy bears him two children and is ever faithful and loving. Finally, he accepts Morado's offer, and they take along with them their former landlady and nurse, Mrs. Harney. Against his better judgment, Dan falls in love with Dulce; and when Morado dies, the two of them go to Paris. As Dan is about to divorce his wife, he is conscience-striken by memories of his family and returns to them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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