Rain or Shine (1930)

90 mins | Comedy-drama | 15 August 1930

Director:

Frank Capra

Producer:

Harry Cohn

Cinematographer:

Joseph Walker

Editor:

Maurice Wright

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Although Ager and Yellen's score from the stage show was adapted and re-used for the film, none of their songs are performed in the movie. Instrumental versions of the musical's songs, including "Rain or Shine" and "Happy Days Are Here Again," are heard only as background music in the film. Joe Cook, Tom Howard and Dave Chasen appeared in the original Broadway production of the musical and recreated their stage roles for this film, in which Cook made his screen debut.
       According to a studio publicity item, scenes for the film were shot at the Burbank, CA ranch of former world heavyweight boxing champion James J. Jeffries. Jeffries appears as an extra in the picture. A May 1930 FD news item states that the A. W. Copeland Circus was to appear in the film. A studio publicity item confirms that Columbia erected a circus on Jeffries' land. Although modern sources state that to film the final fire sequence, Capra burned down the entire circus and used several cameras to photograph sufficient footage of the fire, the same circus sets appear to have been used for the 1933 Columbia picture The Circus Queen Murder (See Entry). The 1933 film also incorporated footage from the Capra film, including the circus parade and some scenes from the biy top show. Modern sources list Harrison Wiley as the art ... More Less

Although Ager and Yellen's score from the stage show was adapted and re-used for the film, none of their songs are performed in the movie. Instrumental versions of the musical's songs, including "Rain or Shine" and "Happy Days Are Here Again," are heard only as background music in the film. Joe Cook, Tom Howard and Dave Chasen appeared in the original Broadway production of the musical and recreated their stage roles for this film, in which Cook made his screen debut.
       According to a studio publicity item, scenes for the film were shot at the Burbank, CA ranch of former world heavyweight boxing champion James J. Jeffries. Jeffries appears as an extra in the picture. A May 1930 FD news item states that the A. W. Copeland Circus was to appear in the film. A studio publicity item confirms that Columbia erected a circus on Jeffries' land. Although modern sources state that to film the final fire sequence, Capra burned down the entire circus and used several cameras to photograph sufficient footage of the fire, the same circus sets appear to have been used for the 1933 Columbia picture The Circus Queen Murder (See Entry). The 1933 film also incorporated footage from the Capra film, including the circus parade and some scenes from the biy top show. Modern sources list Harrison Wiley as the art director. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
2 Aug 1930
p. 26.
Film Daily
2 May 1930
p. 8.
Film Daily
10 Aug 1930
p. 10.
Life
29 Aug 1930
p. 18.
MPN
26 Jul 1930
p. 61.
New York Times
8 Aug 1930
p. 11.
New Yorker
16 Aug 1930
pp. 55-56.
Time
18 Aug 1930
p. 46.
Variety
23 Jul 1930
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Frank R. Capra Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
Dial and cont
Dial and cont
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus score
Mus score
SOUND
Chief sd eng
Sd tech
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book of the musical Rain or Shine by James Gleason and Maurice Marks (New York, 9 Feb 1928).
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 August 1930
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
14 August 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1491
Physical Properties:
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Western Electric System
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,228
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Although bareback rider Mary Rainey frets over the overdue bills that have been incurred by the struggling Greater John T. Rainey Circus, a concern she inherited from her father, her fast-talking manager "Smiley" Johnson reassures her that her debts are easily overcome. Mary also receives encouragement from her sweetheart, Bud Conway, a neophyte circus employee, whose father owns half of Shrewsbury, the next town on the circus' touring schedule. When the circus arrives in Shrewsbury, Smiley is confronted by Amos K. Shrewsbury, a simple but prosperous feed store owner to whom the circus owes $240. Using his skills as a confidence man, Smiley talks Amos into paying him $300 to become a partner in the circus, then gives the rube $240 of his own money as payment for the feed bill. Later, Smiley convinces Amos to invest an additional $4,700 in the failing circus and solves a lion feeding crisis by telling a group of children that if they bring him a pound of meat from home, they will receive free admission to the next performance. Bud then informs Mary that his parents are anxious to meet her and have planned a banquet in her honor. While Mary asks Smiley to the banquet, Bud, who hopes that his father will invest in the circus, invites several performers, including ringmaster Dalton. At the banquet, Smiley, who secretly loves Mary, conspires with Dave, the Shrewsbury dimwit, to mock his upper-class hosts. Infuriated by their guests' outrageous behavior, the Conways storm from the dinner in a huff, and a humiliated Mary denounces Smiley. The next day, Mary fires Smiley and hires Dalton as her ... +


Although bareback rider Mary Rainey frets over the overdue bills that have been incurred by the struggling Greater John T. Rainey Circus, a concern she inherited from her father, her fast-talking manager "Smiley" Johnson reassures her that her debts are easily overcome. Mary also receives encouragement from her sweetheart, Bud Conway, a neophyte circus employee, whose father owns half of Shrewsbury, the next town on the circus' touring schedule. When the circus arrives in Shrewsbury, Smiley is confronted by Amos K. Shrewsbury, a simple but prosperous feed store owner to whom the circus owes $240. Using his skills as a confidence man, Smiley talks Amos into paying him $300 to become a partner in the circus, then gives the rube $240 of his own money as payment for the feed bill. Later, Smiley convinces Amos to invest an additional $4,700 in the failing circus and solves a lion feeding crisis by telling a group of children that if they bring him a pound of meat from home, they will receive free admission to the next performance. Bud then informs Mary that his parents are anxious to meet her and have planned a banquet in her honor. While Mary asks Smiley to the banquet, Bud, who hopes that his father will invest in the circus, invites several performers, including ringmaster Dalton. At the banquet, Smiley, who secretly loves Mary, conspires with Dave, the Shrewsbury dimwit, to mock his upper-class hosts. Infuriated by their guests' outrageous behavior, the Conways storm from the dinner in a huff, and a humiliated Mary denounces Smiley. The next day, Mary fires Smiley and hires Dalton as her new manager, unaware that he and Foltz, the lion tamer, are plotting to take over the circus. Although a large crowd shows up at the circus that sunny afternoon, all of the ticket sales money is impounded by the Shrewsbury sheriff. Just as the show is to begin, Dalton and Foltz incite the performers, who have not been paid in four weeks, to strike. As Mary struggles to keep the audience in their seats, Smiley sees Bud, who was unable to extract any money from his parents, driving madly back to the circus. Moments after Mary signs Dalton's agreement, however, Smiley arrives and rips up the contract. He then convinces some of the striking acts to go on without pay, while ordering other employees to give impromptu performances. Although Smiley and Dave's acrobatic and juggling act is a hit, Dalton and Foltz agitate the audience to storm the ring. Soon a riotous confrontation ensues, and one of the tents is accidentally set on fire. As the fire jumps from tent to tent, Smiley rescues Mary, who has been caught in a tent rope, from the burning big top. The next day, Smiley, Amos and the decimated but still beating circus gather themselves together and, as the rain pours down, ride to their next engagement. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Show business


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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