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HISTORY

Advertisements in the 21 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced the title as actress Clara Bow’s first release for 1929. Clarence Badger had been chosen to direct, according to the 9 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review. The 17 Sep 1928 and 12 Nov 1928 issues identified Frederick Sands as Bow’s prospective leading man, and Malcolm St. Clair as Badger’s replacement. On 15 Dec 1928, Motion Picture News reported that The Saturday Night Kid had been rescheduled as Bow’s second “all-talking picture.” Neither the title nor the storyline had yet been confirmed. The 1 Jan 1929 Paramount Pictures newsletter, Paramount Around the World, attributed the postponement to the studio’s recent acquisition of The Wild Party (1929, see entry), an original story by Warner Fabian, which became Bow’s first talkie.
       An item in the 1 Jun 1929 Motion Picture News announced The Angel’s Week End as Bow’s next picture. It was unclear whether the title was intended as an alternative to The Saturday Night Kid, which was postponed a second time in favor of Dangerous Curves (1929, see entry).
       The 10 Jul 1929 FD reported that actress Jean Arthur was assigned to the picture after being replaced by Doris Hill in Darkened Rooms (1929, see entry). Three days later, Motion Picture News and Hollywood Filmograph announced Richard Hall as director and James Hall as the leading man. Also joining the cast was singer Frank Ross, who was expected ... More Less

Advertisements in the 21 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World announced the title as actress Clara Bow’s first release for 1929. Clarence Badger had been chosen to direct, according to the 9 Jul 1928 Exhibitors Daily Review. The 17 Sep 1928 and 12 Nov 1928 issues identified Frederick Sands as Bow’s prospective leading man, and Malcolm St. Clair as Badger’s replacement. On 15 Dec 1928, Motion Picture News reported that The Saturday Night Kid had been rescheduled as Bow’s second “all-talking picture.” Neither the title nor the storyline had yet been confirmed. The 1 Jan 1929 Paramount Pictures newsletter, Paramount Around the World, attributed the postponement to the studio’s recent acquisition of The Wild Party (1929, see entry), an original story by Warner Fabian, which became Bow’s first talkie.
       An item in the 1 Jun 1929 Motion Picture News announced The Angel’s Week End as Bow’s next picture. It was unclear whether the title was intended as an alternative to The Saturday Night Kid, which was postponed a second time in favor of Dangerous Curves (1929, see entry).
       The 10 Jul 1929 FD reported that actress Jean Arthur was assigned to the picture after being replaced by Doris Hill in Darkened Rooms (1929, see entry). Three days later, Motion Picture News and Hollywood Filmograph announced Richard Hall as director and James Hall as the leading man. Also joining the cast was singer Frank Ross, who was expected to perform a song in the picture, according to the 26 Aug 1929 FD. John V. A. Weaver and George Abbott were credited with the original story, although there was no mention of their 1926 stage play, Love ’Em and Leave ’Em, upon which the screenplay was based. A silent film based on the play was released under its original title in 1926 (see entry).
       Principal photography began 29 Jul 1929, as stated in the next day’s FD. The article included Clara Bow’s cousin, Billy Bow, in the cast. The 3 Aug 1929 Hollywood Filmograph listed George Marion, Jr., among the writers, adding that Edward Sutherland assumed directorial duties after Richard Hall was reassigned to another project. B. P. Fineman was credited as producer in the 17 Nov 1929 FD. The Sep 1929 Projection Engineering noted that cameraman Harry Fischbeck planned to shoot the picture with a new lens, which he developed to impart a three-dimensional effect to closeups. The 5 Oct 1929 Harrison’s Reports index noted that Paramount offered both synchronized disk and sound-on-film versions of the film; a silent version was also available. According to an advertisement in the Nov 1929 International Photographer, the negative was developed with DuPont chemicals.
       Based on box-office reports in the 26 Oct 1929 Motion Picture News, the film apparently opened at New York City’s Paramount Theatre on 18 or 19 Oct 1929. The 23 Nov 1929 edition reported that revenues from the film disappointed theater management, who hoped to establish a new attendance record for the venue. The addition of singer Rudy Vallee to the bill did little to improve the situation.
       Reviews were mixed: While the 23 Nov 1929 Harrison’s Report and Feb 1930 Picture Play praised Clara Bow’s portrayal of a self-sacrificing shop girl, the Feb 1930 Screenland expressed a preference for the boisterous “flapper” roles that made her a star. Several claimed that Jean Arthur overshadowed Bow, while others paid more notice to the latter’s recent weight gain. Public response was fairly enthusiastic, evidenced by the 7 Dec 1929 Motion Picture News, which listed the film among the ten most profitable current releases.
       Jean Arthur later told the Oct 1930 Talking Screen that the picture had provided her most enjoyable speaking role to date, and described it as a career “milestone” in the Dec 1930 Picture Play. Although Arthur claimed that she affected a whiny, nasal voice specifically for the part of “Janie,” the interviewer noted that her voice had a similar quality in other pictures.
       According to the biography, Clara Bow: Runnin’ Wild by David Stenn, actress Jean Harlow appeared on set wearing nothing underneath her dress. Bow feared that Harlow would upstage her and attempted to have the young newcomer removed from the picture. The star soon changed her mind and insisted that Harlow to pose for publicity photographs with herself, Jean Arthur, and fellow cast member Leone Lane.
       In an interview with the Jan 1931 Silver Screen, Harlow recalled her minor role in The Saturday Night Kid as the “break” that established her career. She explained that, shortly after production had been completed, she encountered co-star James Hall at Metropolitan Studios during the filming of Hell’s Angels (1930, see entry), and he recommended her for the female lead.
       Some sources list this film's length as 6,392 feet. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Nov 1929
p. 275
Exhibitors Daily Review
17 Sep 1928
p. 1
Exhibitors Daily Review
26 Sep 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Daily Review
13 Dec 1928
p. 3
Exhibitors Daily Review
21 Jul 1928
p. 4
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
21 Jul 1928
p. 3
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
2 Nov 1929
p. 54
Film Daily
18 Jan 1929
p. 7
Film Daily
10 Jul 1929
p. 6
Film Daily
30 Jul 1929
p. 8
Film Daily
26 Aug 1929
p. 5
Film Daily
17 Nov 1929
p. 6, 9
Film Mercury
26 Jul 1929
p. 21
Harrison's Reports
5 Oct 1929
p. 183
Harrison's Reports
23 Nov 1929
p. 187
Hollywood Fillmograph
13 Jul 1929
p. 1
Hollywood Fillmograph
3 Aug 1929
p. 4
Hollywood Fillmograph
22 Mar 1930
p. 20
International Photographer
Nov 1929
p. 17
Motion Picture
Dec 1928
p. 14
Motion Picture News
15 Dec 1928
p. 1809
Motion Picture News
1 Jun 1929
p. 1912
Motion Picture News
13 Jul 1929
p. 234
Motion Picture News
26 Oct 1929
p. 27
Motion Picture News
23 Nov 1929
p. 28, 37
Motion Picture News
30 Nov 1929
p. 26
Motion Picture News
7 Dec 1929
p. 20, 37
New Movie Magazine
Sep 1930
p. 58
New York Times
16 Nov 1929
p. 25.
Paramount Around the World
1 Jan 1929
p. 6
Paramount Around the World
1 Dec 1929
p. 16
Picture Play
Feb 1930
p. 96
Picture Play
Dec 1930
p. 57, 108
Projection Engineering
Sep 1929
p. 56
Screenland
Feb 1930
p. 88
Silver Screen
Jan 1931
p. 61
Talking Screen
Oct 1930
p. 43
Variety
12 Aug 1928
p. 112
Variety
16 Oct 1929
p. 9
Variety
23 Oct 1929
p. 10
Variety
20 Nov 1929
p. 30.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Angel's Week End
Love 'Em and Leave 'Em
Release Date:
19 October 1929
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 October 1929
Production Date:
began 29 July 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Famous Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 October 1929
Copyright Number:
LP792
Physical Properties:
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Movietone and disc
Duration(in mins):
62
Length(in feet):
6,015
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Mayme, a salesgirl in Ginsberg's department store, is in love with Bill, another clerk; but when he is promoted to floorwalker and Mayme's sister, Janie, is made treasurer of the benefit pageant, Mayme loses Bill to her sister. Janie, however, has been losing racing bets placed with Lem Woodruff, proprietor of the boardinghouse where she and Mayme live; and to make up her losses, she places the pageant money on a winning horse, but inadvertently the bet is placed on another horse. She confesses her predicament to Mayme, who wins back the money by shooting craps with Lem. Janie blames her sister for the loss until Mayme shows up with the money and vents her righteous wrath on her hypocritical sister. Bill returns to Mayme, and Janie finds happiness with Jim, a fellow ... +


Mayme, a salesgirl in Ginsberg's department store, is in love with Bill, another clerk; but when he is promoted to floorwalker and Mayme's sister, Janie, is made treasurer of the benefit pageant, Mayme loses Bill to her sister. Janie, however, has been losing racing bets placed with Lem Woodruff, proprietor of the boardinghouse where she and Mayme live; and to make up her losses, she places the pageant money on a winning horse, but inadvertently the bet is placed on another horse. She confesses her predicament to Mayme, who wins back the money by shooting craps with Lem. Janie blames her sister for the loss until Mayme shows up with the money and vents her righteous wrath on her hypocritical sister. Bill returns to Mayme, and Janie finds happiness with Jim, a fellow boarder. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.