Silent Sanderson (1925)

Western, Comedy-drama | 13 April 1925

Director:

Scott R. Dunlap

Cinematographer:

Sol Polito

Editor:

Harry L. Decker

Production Designer:

Edward Withers

Production Company:

Hunt Stromberg Corp.
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HISTORY

Silent Sanderson was the eighth Harry Carey Western in a series of twelve films produced by Hunt Stromberg and released by Producers Distributing Corporation.
       The 14 Feb 1925 Moving Picture World announced that casting for Silent Sanderson was completed that week, and production would begin immediately. Six weeks later, the 28 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the film was ready to go into “immediate production,” but the news item may have been delayed. The 18 Apr 1925 Moving Picture World and 25 Apr 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted, respectively, that filming was completed and editor Harry L. Decker was “working day and night in the cutting room” to put the “final editorial touches” on Silent Sanderson.
       Reviews were generally favorable. The 1 Aug 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review opined that “the elastic arm of coincidence has been stretched almost to the breaking point,” but praised the film for its memorable snow scenes.
       For more information about all twelve 1924-1925 Carey films, see The Night Hawk. ... More Less

Silent Sanderson was the eighth Harry Carey Western in a series of twelve films produced by Hunt Stromberg and released by Producers Distributing Corporation.
       The 14 Feb 1925 Moving Picture World announced that casting for Silent Sanderson was completed that week, and production would begin immediately. Six weeks later, the 28 Mar 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that the film was ready to go into “immediate production,” but the news item may have been delayed. The 18 Apr 1925 Moving Picture World and 25 Apr 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review noted, respectively, that filming was completed and editor Harry L. Decker was “working day and night in the cutting room” to put the “final editorial touches” on Silent Sanderson.
       Reviews were generally favorable. The 1 Aug 1925 Exhibitors Trade Review opined that “the elastic arm of coincidence has been stretched almost to the breaking point,” but praised the film for its memorable snow scenes.
       For more information about all twelve 1924-1925 Carey films, see The Night Hawk.

More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Mar 1925
p. 43.
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Apr 1925
p. 34.
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Aug 1925
p. 60.
Film Daily
14 Jun 1925
p. 11.
Film Daily
21 Jun 1925.
---
Motion Picture News
20 Jun 1925
p. 3075.
Moving Picture World
14 Feb 1925
p. 721.
Moving Picture World
18 Apr 1925
p. 705.
Moving Picture World
20 Jun 1925
p. 858.
New York Times
11 Jun 1925
p. 14.
Variety
10 Jun 1925
p. 37.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 April 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Hunt Stromberg Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 May 1925
Copyright Number:
LP21751
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,841
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Southwest ranchers Jim Downing, Art Parsons, and his brother Joel Parsons fight over Judith Benson, a beautiful milliner whom they all want to marry. She is swept off her feet by the ruthless Downing, however, and agrees to marry him. Art is found dead, apparently having killed himself in his grief, and Joel, blaming Judith for his death, sets off for Alaska to assuage his sorrow. Several years later, Joel meets Judith in a Yukon dancehall, where, having left her rotten husband, she has become an indentured entertainer. Joel (known now as “Silent Sanderson”) uses his fists and a payment of gold to free Judith, and takes her to his cabin, planning to avenge his brother’s death on her. Jim Downing follows and, stricken with snow blindness, brags to Joel that he will kill him just as he once killed Art Parsons. When Downing attacks Judith, Joel defends her, and throws the battered Downing to a pack of wolves in the snow. He forgives Judith, and with his sympathy rekindled, takes her back to the Southwest cow ... +


Southwest ranchers Jim Downing, Art Parsons, and his brother Joel Parsons fight over Judith Benson, a beautiful milliner whom they all want to marry. She is swept off her feet by the ruthless Downing, however, and agrees to marry him. Art is found dead, apparently having killed himself in his grief, and Joel, blaming Judith for his death, sets off for Alaska to assuage his sorrow. Several years later, Joel meets Judith in a Yukon dancehall, where, having left her rotten husband, she has become an indentured entertainer. Joel (known now as “Silent Sanderson”) uses his fists and a payment of gold to free Judith, and takes her to his cabin, planning to avenge his brother’s death on her. Jim Downing follows and, stricken with snow blindness, brags to Joel that he will kill him just as he once killed Art Parsons. When Downing attacks Judith, Joel defends her, and throws the battered Downing to a pack of wolves in the snow. He forgives Judith, and with his sympathy rekindled, takes her back to the Southwest cow country. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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