Soul of the Beast (1923)

Melodrama | 7 May 1923

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HISTORY

The working title of the film was Someone to Love, as noted by several contemporary sources throughout the spring of 1922. The 1 Apr 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that principal photography would begin the first full week of Apr 1922. Reeve Houck, assistant production manager at Ince Studios, arranged for cast and crew to join a traveling circus, and by the end of Apr 1922, the film company was on the road with a performing troupe. The 6 May 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review clarified that the circus in question was the Howe’s Great London Circus, and noted filmmakers’ plans to follow the troupe to the San Francisco Bay Area. Two to three weeks were spent filming with the circus.
       On 16 Sep 1922, Moving Picture World announced that the Thomas H. Ince production had been retitled, Ten Ton Love. Although Ince had initially struck a distribution deal with Associated First National Pictures, an 11 Jan 1923 FD news brief explained that producer and distributor fell into a disagreement over the film’s “exhibition value,” which was set at $700,000. First National considered the figure to be too high, and countered with a reduced valuation. Ince rejected the offer. Two months later, a 15 Mar 1923 FD news item indicated that Metro Pictures Corporation had agreed to distribute the picture under the title, Soul of the Beast. The film received enthusiastic reviews in the 21 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News and 5 May 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. Critics admired the authenticity of the circus scenes, as well as the cyclone ... More Less

The working title of the film was Someone to Love, as noted by several contemporary sources throughout the spring of 1922. The 1 Apr 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that principal photography would begin the first full week of Apr 1922. Reeve Houck, assistant production manager at Ince Studios, arranged for cast and crew to join a traveling circus, and by the end of Apr 1922, the film company was on the road with a performing troupe. The 6 May 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review clarified that the circus in question was the Howe’s Great London Circus, and noted filmmakers’ plans to follow the troupe to the San Francisco Bay Area. Two to three weeks were spent filming with the circus.
       On 16 Sep 1922, Moving Picture World announced that the Thomas H. Ince production had been retitled, Ten Ton Love. Although Ince had initially struck a distribution deal with Associated First National Pictures, an 11 Jan 1923 FD news brief explained that producer and distributor fell into a disagreement over the film’s “exhibition value,” which was set at $700,000. First National considered the figure to be too high, and countered with a reduced valuation. Ince rejected the offer. Two months later, a 15 Mar 1923 FD news item indicated that Metro Pictures Corporation had agreed to distribute the picture under the title, Soul of the Beast. The film received enthusiastic reviews in the 21 Apr 1923 Motion Picture News and 5 May 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. Critics admired the authenticity of the circus scenes, as well as the cyclone that tears through the touring troupe’s encampment. Oscar the elephant was commended for his artful, comedic performance. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Apr 1922.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
6 May 1922.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 May 1923.
---
Film Daily
11 Jan 1923.
---
Film Daily
15 Mar 1923.
---
Motion Picture News
21 Apr 1923.
---
Moving Picture World
16 Sep 1922
p. 191.
Moving Picture World
5 May 1923.
---
Variety
24 May 1923
p. 23.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Someone to Love
Ten Ton Love
Release Date:
7 May 1923
Production Date:
began early April 1922
Copyright Claimant:
Thomas H. Ince Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 June 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19153
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,020
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Ruth Lorrimore is tired of being abused by her stepfather, the owner of a circus. Aided by Oscar, an elephant, she escapes to the Canadian woods, where she meets Paul Nadeau, a crippled boy musician who has incurred the wrath of the town bully, Caesar. After proving himself a hero many times, Oscar the elephant rescues Ruth from Caesar. Paul and Ruth marry and Oscar willingly rocks the cradle. As reviewed in the 5 May 1923 Moving Picture World. ... +


Ruth Lorrimore is tired of being abused by her stepfather, the owner of a circus. Aided by Oscar, an elephant, she escapes to the Canadian woods, where she meets Paul Nadeau, a crippled boy musician who has incurred the wrath of the town bully, Caesar. After proving himself a hero many times, Oscar the elephant rescues Ruth from Caesar. Paul and Ruth marry and Oscar willingly rocks the cradle. As reviewed in the 5 May 1923 Moving Picture World. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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