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HISTORY

The opening sequence, in which “Jenny Hagen” fantasizes being a famous actress, and the closing sequence at Jenny and “Orme Wilson’s” wheat-cakes diner, were filmed in two-strip Technicolor. Both were shot at the Famous Players-Lasky Studio in Astoria, Queens, NY.
       Exteriors were shot in New Martinsville, WV, whose name was incorporated into the story. Showboat auditorium interiors were filmed aboard the Water Queen moored at the New Martinsville wharf. The 20 Aug 1925 Wetzel Democrat, based in New Martinsville, the seat of Wetzel County, as well as the Nov 1925 issue of Photoplay, covered in detail the film company’s eleven-day visit to the small Ohio River town. Art director Van Nest Polglase and location manager Arthur Cozine “combed the Ohio River valley for two hundred miles or more” before settling on the picturesque town of 4,500 people. The arrival of a movie company with a star like Gloria Swanson was a major event in the community. A local lumber company placed its mill and fleet of trucks at the production’s disposal, and the film’s construction foreman, W. Lally, put a “crew of carpenters” to work to build tables and a pavilion for an “old time picnic” scene in the town’s Grove Park. The newspaper reported that filming began on Tuesday, 18 Aug 1925, on the town’s wharf and aboard the “floating theater Water Queen,” a popular showboat on the Ohio River, which was brought two hundred miles upriver to New Martinsville. About 2,500 people assembled at the wharf to watch or to participate as “extras.” During her stay in town, Gloria Swanson, accompanied by her husband, Marquis de la Falaise, hosted ... More Less

The opening sequence, in which “Jenny Hagen” fantasizes being a famous actress, and the closing sequence at Jenny and “Orme Wilson’s” wheat-cakes diner, were filmed in two-strip Technicolor. Both were shot at the Famous Players-Lasky Studio in Astoria, Queens, NY.
       Exteriors were shot in New Martinsville, WV, whose name was incorporated into the story. Showboat auditorium interiors were filmed aboard the Water Queen moored at the New Martinsville wharf. The 20 Aug 1925 Wetzel Democrat, based in New Martinsville, the seat of Wetzel County, as well as the Nov 1925 issue of Photoplay, covered in detail the film company’s eleven-day visit to the small Ohio River town. Art director Van Nest Polglase and location manager Arthur Cozine “combed the Ohio River valley for two hundred miles or more” before settling on the picturesque town of 4,500 people. The arrival of a movie company with a star like Gloria Swanson was a major event in the community. A local lumber company placed its mill and fleet of trucks at the production’s disposal, and the film’s construction foreman, W. Lally, put a “crew of carpenters” to work to build tables and a pavilion for an “old time picnic” scene in the town’s Grove Park. The newspaper reported that filming began on Tuesday, 18 Aug 1925, on the town’s wharf and aboard the “floating theater Water Queen,” a popular showboat on the Ohio River, which was brought two hundred miles upriver to New Martinsville. About 2,500 people assembled at the wharf to watch or to participate as “extras.” During her stay in town, Gloria Swanson, accompanied by her husband, Marquis de la Falaise, hosted a screening of her latest film, Manhandled (1925, see entry). Whereas most of the cast and crew stayed at the Riverview Hotel near the wharf, Swanson was installed at the riverside home of J. Orville Noll, a prominent resident who leased the Water Queen to the production. West Virginia Governor Howard M. Gore stopped in town to spend an evening with Swanson.
       At the end of Aug, 1925, the production returned to the studio in Astoria, Queens. The 1 Oct 1925 FD noted that camera work ended there during the “past few days.”
       Stage Struck premiered 7 Nov 1925 in Columbus, OH, according to the 10 Nov 1925 FD. It opened at New York’s Rivoli Theatre on Broadway the following week, on 16 Nov 1925. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
8 Aug 1925
p. 13,
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 Sep 1925
p. 66.
Exhibitors Trade Review
3 Oct 1925
p. 13.
Exhibitors Trade Review
21 Nov 1925
p. 27.
Film Daily
1 Oct 1925
p. 8.
Film Daily
9 Nov 1925
p. 2.
Film Daily
10 Nov 1925
p. 3.
Film Daily
22 Nov 1925
p. 10.
Motion Picture News
5 Sep 1925
p. 1126.
Motion Picture News
19 Sep 1925
p. 1353.
Motion Picture News
28 Nov 1925
p. 2569.
Moving Picture World
26 Sep 1925
p. 344.
Moving Picture World
3 Oct 1925
p. 1589.
New York Times
16 Nov 1925
p. 19.
Photoplay
Nov 1925
pp. 32-33, 127.
Picture-Play
Nov 1925
p. 44.
Variety
25 Nov 1925
p. 38.
Wetzel Democrat (New Martinsville, WV)
20 Aug 1925.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
Asst dir
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
2d camera
Asst cam
Asst cam
Stills
Elec
Elec
Elec
Elec
Elec
Elec
Elec
Elec
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Supv ed
SET DECORATORS
Const supv, carpenter
Props
Painter
Prop man
Prop man
Prop man
COSTUMES
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Continuity
Pub
Comedy dir
Loc and financial mgr
Maid for Miss Swanson
STAND INS
Double
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 November 1925
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 16 November 1925
Production Date:
mid August--late September 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
16 November 1925
Copyright Number:
LP22007
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black & white with color sequences
Color scenes by Technicolor
Length(in feet):
6,691
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In the river town of New Martinsville, West Virginia, Jenny Hagen, a stage-struck diner waitress, daydreams about being a famous actress. She loves the diner’s pancake specialist, Orme Wilson, whose fancy flipping skills at the front window griddle attract passing customers. Jenny is shy and awkward around Orme, and a clumsy waitress besides. He calls her “Mouse” instead of Jenny. When she drops a tray during the factory rush, Jenny gives her usual excuse: “I just did it to be funny.” She secretly washes Orme’s clothes instead of taking them to the laundry, and when she irons a hole in his $3 shirt, she buys a $5 replacement. Knowing that Orme has dozens of actress photographs on the wall of his room, Jenny pays $5 for an acting correspondence course, which amounts to a few pages of instruction, and strikes poses in front of her bedroom mirror. One day, a whistle signals the arrival of the Water Queen, a river showboat, and impresario Waldo Buck greets the locals by introducing actress Lillian Lyons, the star of the show. Orme falls for the leading lady, and invites her to the diner for supper. When the actress arrives, Jenny studies her. Orme asks Jenny to help him with his kitchen chores, so he can spend time with Lillian, and she agrees only if he lets her help flip wheat-cakes at the town picnic the next day. That night, Jenny takes scissors to her clothing, refashioning them to match Lillian’s style. However, the following day, Orme is disgusted with Jenny’s heavy makeup, and Jenny gets into a tiff with Lillian, who looks down on waitresses. When ... +


In the river town of New Martinsville, West Virginia, Jenny Hagen, a stage-struck diner waitress, daydreams about being a famous actress. She loves the diner’s pancake specialist, Orme Wilson, whose fancy flipping skills at the front window griddle attract passing customers. Jenny is shy and awkward around Orme, and a clumsy waitress besides. He calls her “Mouse” instead of Jenny. When she drops a tray during the factory rush, Jenny gives her usual excuse: “I just did it to be funny.” She secretly washes Orme’s clothes instead of taking them to the laundry, and when she irons a hole in his $3 shirt, she buys a $5 replacement. Knowing that Orme has dozens of actress photographs on the wall of his room, Jenny pays $5 for an acting correspondence course, which amounts to a few pages of instruction, and strikes poses in front of her bedroom mirror. One day, a whistle signals the arrival of the Water Queen, a river showboat, and impresario Waldo Buck greets the locals by introducing actress Lillian Lyons, the star of the show. Orme falls for the leading lady, and invites her to the diner for supper. When the actress arrives, Jenny studies her. Orme asks Jenny to help him with his kitchen chores, so he can spend time with Lillian, and she agrees only if he lets her help flip wheat-cakes at the town picnic the next day. That night, Jenny takes scissors to her clothing, refashioning them to match Lillian’s style. However, the following day, Orme is disgusted with Jenny’s heavy makeup, and Jenny gets into a tiff with Lillian, who looks down on waitresses. When Jenny tells Waldo Buck that she is an actress, he offers her a chance to recite a few lines of poetry on Saturday before the presentation of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, but first she must participate in a “Ladies Boxing Bout” with Lillian. To Orme’s surprise, Jenny announces she cannot attend the Water Queen festivities. On Saturday, as townspeople crowd into the showboat’s auditorium, Waldo Buck informs Jenny she must wear a stocking over her head because she is “the Masked Marvel.” Separately, Buck tells Lillian that Jenny will fall down after the first few punches. During the fight, however, Jenny accidentally knocks out Lillian, and the crowd goes wild. As Jenny recites her lines of poetry, Lillian gets up and hits her from behind. When Buck’s assistant throws Jenny out the stage door for not following the script, she hears Orme yelling at Lillian, but believes he is angry at her instead of the actress. In despair, Jenny jumps into the river. Orme leaps to her rescue, and as Jenny protests, he tells her: “Shut up, Mouse, I love you.” Together they open their own railroad car diner, “the Jenny,” which specializes in heart-shaped “Lovers Wheat-Cakes.”
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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.