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HISTORY

In a column called "A Letter from Location" in the Aug 1924 Picture-Play, Bessie Love described how the production began on a large prairie ranch, sixty-five miles from El Paso, TX, where a sand storm shut down work for three days. After returning briefly to Hollywood, the cast and crew traveled to Douglas, AZ, where they stayed while filming exteriors thirty miles away.
       The film was copyrighted as 8 ... More Less

In a column called "A Letter from Location" in the Aug 1924 Picture-Play, Bessie Love described how the production began on a large prairie ranch, sixty-five miles from El Paso, TX, where a sand storm shut down work for three days. After returning briefly to Hollywood, the cast and crew traveled to Douglas, AZ, where they stayed while filming exteriors thirty miles away.
       The film was copyrighted as 8 reels. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Picture-Play
Aug 1924
p. 93, 114-115.
DETAILS
Release Date:
1924
Premiere Information:
release: June or 23 November 1924
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures
Copyright Date:
2 October 1924
Copyright Number:
LP20616
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
8,640
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Threatened with financial ruin by the growing numbers of homesteaders who fence in the range for farmland, John Brent and his son, Hugh, go east to seek monetary aid. They fail, and upon their return, the ranchers decide to make one last, great cattledrive to Mexico and reestablish themselves there. The move begins, and a stampede wipes out the homestead of Henry Crawley and his children (one of whom, Ellen, Hugh Brent met on the train from the East). Hugh persuades the cattlemen to admit the Crawleys, and Ellen gradually wins their friendship with her helpfulness. After many hardships, the drive reaches Mexico, the ranchers take up a collection for the Crawleys, and Hugh promises to marry ... +


Threatened with financial ruin by the growing numbers of homesteaders who fence in the range for farmland, John Brent and his son, Hugh, go east to seek monetary aid. They fail, and upon their return, the ranchers decide to make one last, great cattledrive to Mexico and reestablish themselves there. The move begins, and a stampede wipes out the homestead of Henry Crawley and his children (one of whom, Ellen, Hugh Brent met on the train from the East). Hugh persuades the cattlemen to admit the Crawleys, and Ellen gradually wins their friendship with her helpfulness. After many hardships, the drive reaches Mexico, the ranchers take up a collection for the Crawleys, and Hugh promises to marry Ellen. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.