Untamed (1929)

85 mins | Comedy-drama | 20 November 1929

Full page view
HISTORY

Referring to the film as Jungle, the 10 Apr 1929 FD announced the feature as Joan Crawford’s next starrer, to be directed by Jack Conway. The picture was an adaptation of an unnamed short story by Charles E. Scoggins, which, according to the 13 May 1929 FD, first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post. Sylvia Thalberg and Frank Butler were writing the screen adaptation. The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. (M-G-M) release marked Crawford’s first talking picture.
       The 16 Jun 1929 FD reported that the picture would be released in both silent and sound versions.
       The 25 Jun 1929 FD stated that production would soon begin, and the 7 Jul 1929 issue announced that principal photography was underway at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Tom O’Brien was reportedly added to the cast. A 10 Aug 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World production chart listed a 27 Jun 1929 production start date.
       On 20 Jul 1929, Hollywood Filmograph indicated that Joan Crawford would sing two songs in Jungle, noting that the film title was temporary. The songs were listed as: “The Jungle Song,” by Nacio Herb Brown, and “That Wonderful Something Called Love,” by Arthur Freed. However, the songs were later credited as: "That Wonderful Something (Is Love)," words by Joe Goodwin, music by Louis Alter; "Chant of the Jungle," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown.
       The 20 Jul 1929 Motion Picutre News listed additional featured players as Crawford’s husband, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Rod La Rocque, and Anita Page, although none were credited in reviews.
       The title change to Untamed ... More Less

Referring to the film as Jungle, the 10 Apr 1929 FD announced the feature as Joan Crawford’s next starrer, to be directed by Jack Conway. The picture was an adaptation of an unnamed short story by Charles E. Scoggins, which, according to the 13 May 1929 FD, first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post. Sylvia Thalberg and Frank Butler were writing the screen adaptation. The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp. (M-G-M) release marked Crawford’s first talking picture.
       The 16 Jun 1929 FD reported that the picture would be released in both silent and sound versions.
       The 25 Jun 1929 FD stated that production would soon begin, and the 7 Jul 1929 issue announced that principal photography was underway at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA. Tom O’Brien was reportedly added to the cast. A 10 Aug 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World production chart listed a 27 Jun 1929 production start date.
       On 20 Jul 1929, Hollywood Filmograph indicated that Joan Crawford would sing two songs in Jungle, noting that the film title was temporary. The songs were listed as: “The Jungle Song,” by Nacio Herb Brown, and “That Wonderful Something Called Love,” by Arthur Freed. However, the songs were later credited as: "That Wonderful Something (Is Love)," words by Joe Goodwin, music by Louis Alter; "Chant of the Jungle," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown.
       The 20 Jul 1929 Motion Picutre News listed additional featured players as Crawford’s husband, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Rod La Rocque, and Anita Page, although none were credited in reviews.
       The title change to Untamed was announced in the 31 Aug 1929 Hollywood Filmograph.
       According to the 27 Oct 1929 FD, a fire broke out at Consolidated Film Industries Laboratories where the negatives for Untamed were being edited. The fire resulted in one death and destroyed the plant. However, five of six adjoining vaults containing film negatives were undamaged. M-G-M reportedly “lost negatives” for Untamed, but no further information was given as to the extent of the loss, and no resulting release delays were announced.
       The picture opened in New York City at the Capitol Theatre on 20 Nov 1929, as announced in that day’s Var and their review from 4 Dec 1929.
       Reviews were mixed. The 1 Dec 1929 FD praised Joan Crawford’s performance and the photography, while Var noted the “highly artificial atmosphere.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
10 Aug 1929
p. 36.
Film Daily
10 Apr 1929
p. 6.
Film Daily
13 May 1929
p. 4.
Film Daily
16 Jun 1929
p. 10.
Film Daily
25 Jun 1929
p. 6.
Film Daily
7 Jul 1929
p. 6.
Film Daily
27 Oct 1929
p. 1.
Film Daily
1 Dec 1929
p. 10.
Hollywood Filmograph
20 Jul 1929
p. 5.
Hollywood Filmograph
31 Aug 1929
p. 33.
Motion Picture News
20 Jul 1929
p. 318.
Motion Picture News
3 Aug 1929
pp. 475-476.
New York Times
30 Nov 1929
p. 23.
Variety
20 Nov 1929
p. 8.
Variety
4 Dec 1929
p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on a short story by Charles E. Scoggins (publication undetermined).
SONGS
"That Wonderful Something (Is Love)," words by Joe Goodwin, music by Louis Alter
"Chant of the Jungle," words by Arthur Freed, music by Nacio Herb Brown.
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 November 1929
Premiere Information:
New York City opening at the Capitol Theatre: 20 November 1929
Production Date:
began 27 June 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 April 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1209
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si; 5,348 ft.
Duration(in mins):
85
Length(in feet):
7,911
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Bingo, an American girl, is reared in the uninhibited atmosphere of the jungle tropics by her father. Upon his death, she falls heir to his fortune accrued through oil investments. Her father's friend Ben Murchison takes her to New York, and en route she falls for Andy, an American, and decides to marry him; but her guardian, who has considerable difficulty in civilizing his young ward, induces her to wait. After a year in New York she becomes a lovely, cultured young lady, but Andy refuses to live on her fortune. Bingo finally takes matters into her own hands by having Murchison offer Andy a job in South America, ensuring their future ... +


Bingo, an American girl, is reared in the uninhibited atmosphere of the jungle tropics by her father. Upon his death, she falls heir to his fortune accrued through oil investments. Her father's friend Ben Murchison takes her to New York, and en route she falls for Andy, an American, and decides to marry him; but her guardian, who has considerable difficulty in civilizing his young ward, induces her to wait. After a year in New York she becomes a lovely, cultured young lady, but Andy refuses to live on her fortune. Bingo finally takes matters into her own hands by having Murchison offer Andy a job in South America, ensuring their future happiness. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.