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HISTORY

The 29 Jan 1921 Moving Picture World announced The Young Diana as a forthcoming picture from Cosmopolitan Productions. Four months later, the 27 May 1921 FD reported that preproduction had begun. Marion Davies had been cast to star, and Albert Capellani would be directing, as stated in the 18 Jun 1921 Exhibitors Herald. Elaborate sets were being built for the production by Joseph Urban.
       According to the 16 Jul 1921 Motion Picture News, production was “well underway” at the International Film Studios in New York City. Filmmakers used a new process of “painted ice” to film an indoor ice skating sequence at the studio, as reported in the 15 Jun 1921 Var. World champion ice skater Bobby McLean developed the process for “manufacturing ice,” which could be “painted” onto any surface and skated on immediately. The technique, which did not use water, ammonia, or brine, cost filmmakers $100,000.
       The 16 Jul 1921 Exhibitors Herald announced that lightning struck the top floor New York City studio where artist G. Arthur Birch-Field “was working on an oil painting of Marion Davies for a forthcoming Cosmopolitan production.” Birch-Field was reportedly stunned by the bolt, but managed to flee with the painting before the ceiling fell in, destroying the studio.
       The 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News reported additional locations in Boston, MA, and along the MA coast, where production was delayed due to bad weather. After principal photography was completed, Marion Davies, who had worked all summer long on back-to-back productions without a day off, boarded a last minute train from Boston to embark on a ... More Less

The 29 Jan 1921 Moving Picture World announced The Young Diana as a forthcoming picture from Cosmopolitan Productions. Four months later, the 27 May 1921 FD reported that preproduction had begun. Marion Davies had been cast to star, and Albert Capellani would be directing, as stated in the 18 Jun 1921 Exhibitors Herald. Elaborate sets were being built for the production by Joseph Urban.
       According to the 16 Jul 1921 Motion Picture News, production was “well underway” at the International Film Studios in New York City. Filmmakers used a new process of “painted ice” to film an indoor ice skating sequence at the studio, as reported in the 15 Jun 1921 Var. World champion ice skater Bobby McLean developed the process for “manufacturing ice,” which could be “painted” onto any surface and skated on immediately. The technique, which did not use water, ammonia, or brine, cost filmmakers $100,000.
       The 16 Jul 1921 Exhibitors Herald announced that lightning struck the top floor New York City studio where artist G. Arthur Birch-Field “was working on an oil painting of Marion Davies for a forthcoming Cosmopolitan production.” Birch-Field was reportedly stunned by the bolt, but managed to flee with the painting before the ceiling fell in, destroying the studio.
       The 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News reported additional locations in Boston, MA, and along the MA coast, where production was delayed due to bad weather. After principal photography was completed, Marion Davies, who had worked all summer long on back-to-back productions without a day off, boarded a last minute train from Boston to embark on a CA vacation.
       The 17 Sep 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review listed Jefferson Dickson as the cameraman on The Young Diana.
       Over five months after the announcement that filming had completed, the 21 Jan 1922 Moving Picture World reported that Robert G. Vignola recently finished several retakes for the picture. On 4 Feb 1922, Exhibitors Herald listed Robert G. Vignola as director, along with Albert Capellani. According to the 27 May 1922 Exhibitors Trade Review, Vignola had been directing Marion Davies’s next picture for Cosmopolitan Productions, When Knighthood Was in Flower (1923, see entry), when he was recruited to film the reshoots of The Young Diana.
       The 19 Aug 1922 Exhibitors Herald review lauded the film’s “lavishness,” and its “notable cast,” highlighting its “wondrous direction” by two “master directors.” The Young Diana was hailed by the reviewer as Marion Davies’s best work yet. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
18 Jun 1921.
---
Exhibitors Herald
16 Jul 1921.
---
Exhibitors Herald
4 Feb 1922.
---
Exhibitors Herald
19 Aug 1922.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Sep 1921.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
27 May 1922.
---
Film Daily
27 May 1921
p. 1.
Motion Picture News
16 Jul 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
6 Aug 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
29 Jan 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
21 Jan 1922.
---
Variety
15 Jul 1921
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Young Diana
an Experiment of the Future, a Romance by Marie Corelli (New York, c1918).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 August 1922
Production Date:
June or July--early August 1921
Copyright Claimant:
International Film Service Co., Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 June 1922
Copyright Number:
LP18021
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,744
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The father of young Diana May wishes to marry her to British nobility although she is in love with Richard Cleeve, a sailor, and is pursued by Dr. Dimitrius, a scientist in search of the "elixir of youth." Dimitrius informs Diana that Richard is eloping with Lady Anne, and she believes the false accusation. Twenty years later, as an embittered spinster, she goes to Switzerland in answer to a scientist's advertisement for an experimental subject. Leaving indications of her suicide, she finds Dimitrius, who restores Diana's youth and beauty. Amid the social whirl of Europe, she meets Cleeve, now married, whom she spurns though he offers to desert his wife. Diana awakens to find she has only been dreaming. Cleeve returns, explaining he had received sudden orders for departure, now revoked, and that he was escorting Lady Anne to her new husband. The picture fades out on the wedding of Diana and ... +


The father of young Diana May wishes to marry her to British nobility although she is in love with Richard Cleeve, a sailor, and is pursued by Dr. Dimitrius, a scientist in search of the "elixir of youth." Dimitrius informs Diana that Richard is eloping with Lady Anne, and she believes the false accusation. Twenty years later, as an embittered spinster, she goes to Switzerland in answer to a scientist's advertisement for an experimental subject. Leaving indications of her suicide, she finds Dimitrius, who restores Diana's youth and beauty. Amid the social whirl of Europe, she meets Cleeve, now married, whom she spurns though he offers to desert his wife. Diana awakens to find she has only been dreaming. Cleeve returns, explaining he had received sudden orders for departure, now revoked, and that he was escorting Lady Anne to her new husband. The picture fades out on the wedding of Diana and Cleeve. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.