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HISTORY

The 30 Nov 1912 Moving Picture World stated that filming was underway, based on a report from Richard V. Spencer, “editor of scenarios” for the Broncho Motion Picture Co., a subsidiary of the New York Motion Picture Co. The Nov 1913 Motion Picture Story Magazine identified three cast members as Burton King (“Jim”), Joe King (“Jack”), and Anna Little (“Virginia”). According to the 8 Nov 1913 Motion Picture News, the production required “more than $20,000 worth” of pyrotechnics, and offered several weeks’ employment to “armies” of background actors. Thomas H. Ince was credited as director.
       An advertisement in the 21 Dec 1912 Moving Picture World claimed that the film was to be released in three reels. After attending a private screening at the New York Motion Picture Co. “factory,” a reporter confirmed in the 3 May 1913 Motography that the film had been expanded to five reels. Company executives were identified as Charles O. Baumann, Adam Kessel, and Charles Kessel. The 31 May 1913 Motography noted that the “first semi-public showing” was held on 20 May 1913 at the E. E. Fulton projection room in Chicago, IL. The audience was comprised primarily of exhibitors, who reportedly declared the production to be “the greatest war picture ever attempted.” The 17 May 1913 Moving Picture World revealed that distributor Mutual Film Corporation was inundated with exhibitor requests for the feature, two weeks prior to release.
       Although reviews were generally positive, the 27 Jun 1913 Var complained that the film, a series of combat sequences ... More Less

The 30 Nov 1912 Moving Picture World stated that filming was underway, based on a report from Richard V. Spencer, “editor of scenarios” for the Broncho Motion Picture Co., a subsidiary of the New York Motion Picture Co. The Nov 1913 Motion Picture Story Magazine identified three cast members as Burton King (“Jim”), Joe King (“Jack”), and Anna Little (“Virginia”). According to the 8 Nov 1913 Motion Picture News, the production required “more than $20,000 worth” of pyrotechnics, and offered several weeks’ employment to “armies” of background actors. Thomas H. Ince was credited as director.
       An advertisement in the 21 Dec 1912 Moving Picture World claimed that the film was to be released in three reels. After attending a private screening at the New York Motion Picture Co. “factory,” a reporter confirmed in the 3 May 1913 Motography that the film had been expanded to five reels. Company executives were identified as Charles O. Baumann, Adam Kessel, and Charles Kessel. The 31 May 1913 Motography noted that the “first semi-public showing” was held on 20 May 1913 at the E. E. Fulton projection room in Chicago, IL. The audience was comprised primarily of exhibitors, who reportedly declared the production to be “the greatest war picture ever attempted.” The 17 May 1913 Moving Picture World revealed that distributor Mutual Film Corporation was inundated with exhibitor requests for the feature, two weeks prior to release.
       Although reviews were generally positive, the 27 Jun 1913 Var complained that the film, a series of combat sequences with a romantic subplot, failed to depict “the actions and reactions of both sides.” Nor did it clearly distinguish between Union and Confederate soldiers.
       The 26 Jul 1913 Motography noted the upcoming release of a similar picture, The Fiftieth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, by the Lubin Manufacturing Co.
       Several modern sources credit Charles Giblyn as the co-director. One modern source lists C. Gardner Sullivan as the scenarist, while another credits Charles Brown , Thomas Ince, and Richard Spencer. Sources also conflict regarding cast members: One lists Burton King, Joe King , Gertrude Claire, Shorty Hamilton, Mr. Hadley, and Mr. Edler; the other includes Willard Mack, Charles K. French, Enid Bennett, Herschel Mayall, Walter Edwards, Frank Borzage, J. Barney Sherry, Anna Little , George Fisher, J. Frank Burke, and Enid Markey. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
8 Nov 1913
p. 18
Motion Picture Story Magazine
Nov 1913
p. 140
Motography
3 May 1913
p. 305
Motography
31 May 1913
p. 7, 392, 414
Motography
12 Jul 1913
p. 10, 18
Motography
26 Jul 1913
p. 43
Moving Picture News
14 Jun 1913
p. 1151
Moving Picture World
30 Nov 1912
p. 884
Moving Picture World
21 Dec 1912
p. 1152
Moving Picture World
29 Mar 1913
p. viii
Moving Picture World
26 Apr 1913
pp. 346-47
Moving Picture World
17 May 1913
p. 689
NYDM
11 Jun 1913
p. 27
Variety
27 Jun 1913
p. 16
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Joe King
Anna Little
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCTION MISC
Lab work supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 June 1913
Production Date:
late 1912
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During the Civil War, a young woman's sweetheart enlists to fight for the North, while her brother joins the Confederate forces. These three later join the many whose lives are altered by the great Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 to 3, 1863. Following intense fighting, Confederate General George Pickett's troops are defeated. Later, President Lincoln delivers his Gettysburg Address, and a monument is dedicated on the ... +


During the Civil War, a young woman's sweetheart enlists to fight for the North, while her brother joins the Confederate forces. These three later join the many whose lives are altered by the great Battle of Gettysburg, fought from July 1 to 3, 1863. Following intense fighting, Confederate General George Pickett's troops are defeated. Later, President Lincoln delivers his Gettysburg Address, and a monument is dedicated on the battleground. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.