Your Girl and Mine: a Woman Suffrage Play (1914)

Drama | 14 October 1914

Full page view
HISTORY

This film was sponsored by Mrs. Medill McCormick (Ruth Hanna McCormick, wife of a Chicago Tribune publisher) and the National American Woman Suffrage Association, whose organizations throughout the country sold tickets wherever it played, according to advertisements in the 26 Dec 1914 Motography and 18 Dec 1914 Variety.
       According to the 24 Oct 1914 New York Clipper, the film premiered at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre on 14 Oct 1914 “to a packed house of Chicago's leading suffragettes and society leaders.” The publication deemed that the film's issues were “handled in a broad, vigorous way that awakened sympathy without descending to maudlin sentimentality. Sociological problems were presented in a masterful manner without the slightest suspicion of pandering to the prurient imagination, and the question of child labor and the overworking of women in sweat shops and factories was exhibited in all its inhumanity and horror.”
       The 18 Dec 1914 Variety was less charitable, calling the film a melodrama, and pointed out the “grave mistake” of the heroine looking younger at the end of the picture, after twenty years had passed, than she did at the beginning. Variety also suggested that locations “were evidently taken around New York City,” although it is more likely that producer William N. Selig fllmed in his home city of Chicago.
       The 31 Oct 1914 Motography called Your Girl and Mine an “eight-reel suffrage film” in “three acts, the first two of three parts each, while but two parts are needed for the third and closing act.” The aforementioned ad in the 26 Dec 1914 Motography, however, called ... More Less

This film was sponsored by Mrs. Medill McCormick (Ruth Hanna McCormick, wife of a Chicago Tribune publisher) and the National American Woman Suffrage Association, whose organizations throughout the country sold tickets wherever it played, according to advertisements in the 26 Dec 1914 Motography and 18 Dec 1914 Variety.
       According to the 24 Oct 1914 New York Clipper, the film premiered at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre on 14 Oct 1914 “to a packed house of Chicago's leading suffragettes and society leaders.” The publication deemed that the film's issues were “handled in a broad, vigorous way that awakened sympathy without descending to maudlin sentimentality. Sociological problems were presented in a masterful manner without the slightest suspicion of pandering to the prurient imagination, and the question of child labor and the overworking of women in sweat shops and factories was exhibited in all its inhumanity and horror.”
       The 18 Dec 1914 Variety was less charitable, calling the film a melodrama, and pointed out the “grave mistake” of the heroine looking younger at the end of the picture, after twenty years had passed, than she did at the beginning. Variety also suggested that locations “were evidently taken around New York City,” although it is more likely that producer William N. Selig fllmed in his home city of Chicago.
       The 31 Oct 1914 Motography called Your Girl and Mine an “eight-reel suffrage film” in “three acts, the first two of three parts each, while but two parts are needed for the third and closing act.” The aforementioned ad in the 26 Dec 1914 Motography, however, called it a “dramatic photoplay in 7 acts.”
       Moving Picture World referred to this film “the Uncle Tom’s Cabin of the Suffragette Movement.” Several reviews stated that Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, who appeared in the film, supplied its suffrage arguments. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
7 Nov 1914
p. 70.
Motography
31 Oct 1914
pp. 589-90.
Motography
26 Dec 1914
p. 16.
Motography
23 Jan 1915
p. 154.
New York Clipper
24 Oct 1914
p. 14.
NYDM
4 Nov 1914
p. 28.
NYDM
30 Dec 1914
p. 27.
Variety
18 Dec 1914
p. 25.
Variety
25 Dec 1914
p. 61.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Your Girl and Mine
Release Date:
14 October 1914
Premiere Information:
14 Oct 1914 at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, IL
Copyright Claimant:
Selig Polyscope Co.
Copyright Date:
31 October 1914
Copyright Number:
LP3648
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
7-8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rosalind Fairlie, an heiress living in a state which has not granted women's suffrage, unwittingly marries a dissolute fortune hunter, Ben Austin, without fully realizing that, according to law, she is compelled to settle her husband's debts and turn over property rights to him. Austin has already abandoned his mistress Kate Price, leaving her to struggle as a seamstress in a sweat shop to support herself and their infant son. After ten years of marriage, Rosalind's money has enabled Ben to pay all of his debts and continue with his excesses. He controls all aspects of her life, to the point of not allowing her Aunt Jane, a suffragette, to enter their house. Finally unable to endure Ben's excesses any longer, Rosalind leaves him, taking their two daughters, but when the courts grant Ben custody, Rosalind returns home. Meanwhile, the abandoned Kate, who has suffered the torment of losing her son in a tenement fire, goes to Ben and stabs him to death, but Rosalind, thinking she is free at last, learns that Ben left her fortune and their two daughters to his father. When the uncaring grandfather puts one of the girls to work in a factory, Rosalind abducts them and is subsequently arrested. She is freed, however, and a lawyer, Eleanor Holbrook, eloquently takes on and wins her case. After her daughters are returned to her, Rosalind champions the cause of women's suffrage, and eventually the right to vote is granted. The pen with which the governor signs the bill is given to her by Lieutenant-Governor Richard Burbank, who happens to be her ... +


Rosalind Fairlie, an heiress living in a state which has not granted women's suffrage, unwittingly marries a dissolute fortune hunter, Ben Austin, without fully realizing that, according to law, she is compelled to settle her husband's debts and turn over property rights to him. Austin has already abandoned his mistress Kate Price, leaving her to struggle as a seamstress in a sweat shop to support herself and their infant son. After ten years of marriage, Rosalind's money has enabled Ben to pay all of his debts and continue with his excesses. He controls all aspects of her life, to the point of not allowing her Aunt Jane, a suffragette, to enter their house. Finally unable to endure Ben's excesses any longer, Rosalind leaves him, taking their two daughters, but when the courts grant Ben custody, Rosalind returns home. Meanwhile, the abandoned Kate, who has suffered the torment of losing her son in a tenement fire, goes to Ben and stabs him to death, but Rosalind, thinking she is free at last, learns that Ben left her fortune and their two daughters to his father. When the uncaring grandfather puts one of the girls to work in a factory, Rosalind abducts them and is subsequently arrested. She is freed, however, and a lawyer, Eleanor Holbrook, eloquently takes on and wins her case. After her daughters are returned to her, Rosalind champions the cause of women's suffrage, and eventually the right to vote is granted. The pen with which the governor signs the bill is given to her by Lieutenant-Governor Richard Burbank, who happens to be her fiancé. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.