Full page view
HISTORY

The 11 Nov 1916 Motion Picture News reported that Col. Jasper Ewing Brady, scenario editor for Vitagraph Co. of America, had recently purchased the original story by Edward J. Montagne as a starring vehicle for actor Earle Williams. Another cast member, listed in the 27 Jan 1917 Motography as “V. Stuart” is identified as Victor A. Stewart in other sources.
       The 24 Mar 1917 Motography stated that Vitagraph’s distribution affiliate, V-L-S-E, Inc., was soliciting opinions from U.S. exhibitors on the unusual design of the film’s advertising posters. According to the article, “backgrounds, costumes, and minor points are treated in a flat poster style,” while cast members were featured in the same manner as in other Vitagraph advertising.
       Apartment 29 opened 9 Apr 1917. Although reviews were generally positive, the Jul 1917 Photoplay argued that it would have been a clever picture had it not been “so obviously mechanical.”
       The scenario was adapted by Dorothy Dalton as a short story, titled Apartment No. 29, for the Jun 1917 Motion Picture. ... More Less

The 11 Nov 1916 Motion Picture News reported that Col. Jasper Ewing Brady, scenario editor for Vitagraph Co. of America, had recently purchased the original story by Edward J. Montagne as a starring vehicle for actor Earle Williams. Another cast member, listed in the 27 Jan 1917 Motography as “V. Stuart” is identified as Victor A. Stewart in other sources.
       The 24 Mar 1917 Motography stated that Vitagraph’s distribution affiliate, V-L-S-E, Inc., was soliciting opinions from U.S. exhibitors on the unusual design of the film’s advertising posters. According to the article, “backgrounds, costumes, and minor points are treated in a flat poster style,” while cast members were featured in the same manner as in other Vitagraph advertising.
       Apartment 29 opened 9 Apr 1917. Although reviews were generally positive, the Jul 1917 Photoplay argued that it would have been a clever picture had it not been “so obviously mechanical.”
       The scenario was adapted by Dorothy Dalton as a short story, titled Apartment No. 29, for the Jun 1917 Motion Picture.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
7 Apr 1917
p. 1256
Motion Picture
Jun 1917
p. 82
Motion Picture
Jul 1917
p. 11
Motion Picture News
11 Nov 1917
p. 2970
Motography
27 Jan 1917
p. 200
Motography
24 Mar 1917
p. 608
Motography
14 Apr 1917
pp. 795-796, 799
Moving Picture World
14 Apr 1917
p. 284, 326
NYDM
13 Oct 1917
p. 19
Photoplay
Jul 1917
---
Variety
13 Apr 1917
p. 24
Wid's Daily
19 Apr 1917
pp. 251-252
DETAILS
Release Date:
9 April 1917
Copyright Claimant:
Vitagraph Co. of America
Copyright Date:
31 March 1917
Copyright Number:
LP10485
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Drama critic Stanley Ormsby pans the first performance of the play An Arabian Night for being too improbable and refuses playwright Bobby Davis' plea to reconsider the review. The next day, Ormsby is assigned to interview an opera singer at her apartment. As he enters the building, he sees a woman apparently fall dead in front of apartment 29. Carrying her into the apartment, he discovers the dead body of her husband. The police arrive and accuse him of the murders, and Ormsby flees. Davis, a resident of the same building, offers him refuge in the wardrobe trunk of a girl he calls his friend's "wife." Unable to stand the strain, the girl finally confesses that she is not a friend's wife but a murderess. The two escape, but are attacked by thugs and then captured by the police. Davis then admits that he framed the critic to convince him that the actions in his play were realistic. Proven wrong, Ormsby rewrites his criticism and marries the ... +


Drama critic Stanley Ormsby pans the first performance of the play An Arabian Night for being too improbable and refuses playwright Bobby Davis' plea to reconsider the review. The next day, Ormsby is assigned to interview an opera singer at her apartment. As he enters the building, he sees a woman apparently fall dead in front of apartment 29. Carrying her into the apartment, he discovers the dead body of her husband. The police arrive and accuse him of the murders, and Ormsby flees. Davis, a resident of the same building, offers him refuge in the wardrobe trunk of a girl he calls his friend's "wife." Unable to stand the strain, the girl finally confesses that she is not a friend's wife but a murderess. The two escape, but are attacked by thugs and then captured by the police. Davis then admits that he framed the critic to convince him that the actions in his play were realistic. Proven wrong, Ormsby rewrites his criticism and marries the girl. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.