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HISTORY

The 13 Sep 1925 FD announced that Colleen Moore would star in the First National Pictures, Inc. adaptation of the 1919 stage musical Irene, written by James H. Montgomery, with music and lyrics by Harry Tierney and Joseph McCarthy. Production was expected to start in early Oct 1925. John Francis Dillon was named as director, and Dorothy Seastrom was listed in the cast, but neither remained with the project. The 7 Oct 1925 Var reported that Alfred E. Green had taken over the directing reins, and Dillon had been reassigned to another film.
       The 4 Nov 1925 Var stated that principal photography had recently begun, and Jack Boland and Johnny Dunn were listed as assistant directors. The Dec 1925 Photoplay indicated that filming occurred at United Studios in Hollywood, CA, as First National Studios were based in NY at that time.
       According to the 28 Nov 1925 Motion Picture News, an “elaborate” fashion show sequence, employing over sixty background actors, was planned to be filmed in Technicolor. Betty Francisco was listed in the cast.
       On 27 Dec 1925, FD announced that filming was nearly finished. The 9 Jan 1926 Moving Picture World stated that production had recently completed.
       An item in the 30 Jan 1926 Motion Picture News reported a 21 Feb 1926 national release date, but expected to have the film prints delivered to exhibitors by the end of that month for early release. The 6 Feb 1926 issue noted that Irene would be broadcast nationally over the radio on station WJZ in NY, on 18 Feb 1926.
       ... More Less

The 13 Sep 1925 FD announced that Colleen Moore would star in the First National Pictures, Inc. adaptation of the 1919 stage musical Irene, written by James H. Montgomery, with music and lyrics by Harry Tierney and Joseph McCarthy. Production was expected to start in early Oct 1925. John Francis Dillon was named as director, and Dorothy Seastrom was listed in the cast, but neither remained with the project. The 7 Oct 1925 Var reported that Alfred E. Green had taken over the directing reins, and Dillon had been reassigned to another film.
       The 4 Nov 1925 Var stated that principal photography had recently begun, and Jack Boland and Johnny Dunn were listed as assistant directors. The Dec 1925 Photoplay indicated that filming occurred at United Studios in Hollywood, CA, as First National Studios were based in NY at that time.
       According to the 28 Nov 1925 Motion Picture News, an “elaborate” fashion show sequence, employing over sixty background actors, was planned to be filmed in Technicolor. Betty Francisco was listed in the cast.
       On 27 Dec 1925, FD announced that filming was nearly finished. The 9 Jan 1926 Moving Picture World stated that production had recently completed.
       An item in the 30 Jan 1926 Motion Picture News reported a 21 Feb 1926 national release date, but expected to have the film prints delivered to exhibitors by the end of that month for early release. The 6 Feb 1926 issue noted that Irene would be broadcast nationally over the radio on station WJZ in NY, on 18 Feb 1926.
       The New York opening was held at the Mark Strand Theatre on 28 Feb 1926, according to the 3 Mar 1926 Var review. Irene was scheduled to open in Los Angeles, CA, on 5 Mar 1926, at the Million Dollar Theatre.
       Var praised the modernized adaptation, noting that “the titling sparkles.” Moore’s performance was also lauded, and Irene was deemed “a neat piece of work” and “a good, wholesome comedy.”
       A musical adaptation of Irene was released by RKO in 1940, under the same title, directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle and Ray Milland (see entry). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
13 Sep 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
27 Dec 1925
p. 10.
Film Daily
7 Mar 1926.
---
Life
25 Mar 1926
p. 26.
Motion Picture News
31 Oct 1925
p. 2026.
Motion Picture News
28 Nov 1925
p. 2553.
Motion Picture News
19 Dec 1925
p. 3008.
Motion Picture News
30 Jan 1926
p. 572.
Motion Picture News
6 Feb 1926
p. 684d.
Moving Picture World
9 Jan 1926
p. 159.
Moving Picture World
13 Mar 1926.
---
New York Times
1 Mar 1926
p. 17.
Photoplay
Dec 1925
p. 104.
Photoplay
Apr 1926
p. 55.
Variety
7 Oct 1925
p. 36.
Variety
4 Nov 1925
p. 41.
Variety
3 Mar 1926
pp. 30, 34-35.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scen
Editorial dir, cont
Comedy const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Lighting eff
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the musical Irene, book by James H. Montgomery, music and lyrics by Harry Tierney and Joseph McCarthy (New York, 1 Nov 1919).
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 February 1926
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 28 February 1926
Los Angeles opening: 5 March 1926
Production Date:
early November 1925--early January 1926
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 February 1926
Copyright Number:
LP22387
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black & white with color sequences
Technicolor
Length(in feet):
8,400
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Irene O'Dare, a wistful Irish lass looking for a job in New York City, meets Donald Marshall, a wealthy aristocrat, who arranges for her to become a model in a new modiste's shop. But when the male proprietor, Madame Lucy, gives a fashion show, he leaves Irene behind to watch the shop. Donald finds her there and insists that she attire herself in a new French creation and accompany him to the fashion show. Irene is an immediate sensation with everyone there except Donald's mother, who hires a genealogist to report on the girl's ancestry. After being shown the report, Irene retreats to a fire escape, where Donald finds her lamenting her plight. Overhearing Irene profess love for him, Donald climbs through the window and embraces ... +


Irene O'Dare, a wistful Irish lass looking for a job in New York City, meets Donald Marshall, a wealthy aristocrat, who arranges for her to become a model in a new modiste's shop. But when the male proprietor, Madame Lucy, gives a fashion show, he leaves Irene behind to watch the shop. Donald finds her there and insists that she attire herself in a new French creation and accompany him to the fashion show. Irene is an immediate sensation with everyone there except Donald's mother, who hires a genealogist to report on the girl's ancestry. After being shown the report, Irene retreats to a fire escape, where Donald finds her lamenting her plight. Overhearing Irene profess love for him, Donald climbs through the window and embraces her. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.