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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Stairway of the Stars . This film was advertised in a 4 Jan 1919 trade paper ad under the title Sahara . When the film had its premiere at a special showing at the Rialto Theater in New York on 18 Mar 1919, it was entitled Forbidden Fire . Victor Schertzinger arranged the music for that showing. The film was copyrighted under the title Forbidden Fire and reviewed under that title. Release charts from 5 Apr 1919 until 24 May 1919 included the film under the title Forbidden Fire as a state rights release available from J. Parker Read. No information has been located to confirm that the film was exhibited during this period. An ad appeared on 24 May 1919 announcing that the film, now called Sahara , would be released by W. W. Hodkinson Corp. through Pathé Exchange, Inc. It was announced that in addition to Schertzinger's orchestration, one by Dr. Hugo Reisenfeld would be available to exhibitors. In the reviews for Sahara , no mention was made that the film was the same as Forbidden Fire . The film was released under the title Sahara on 29 Jun 1919. While some sources refer to Allan Dwan as the film's director, most state that he "personally supervised" the film and that Arthur Rosson directed ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Stairway of the Stars . This film was advertised in a 4 Jan 1919 trade paper ad under the title Sahara . When the film had its premiere at a special showing at the Rialto Theater in New York on 18 Mar 1919, it was entitled Forbidden Fire . Victor Schertzinger arranged the music for that showing. The film was copyrighted under the title Forbidden Fire and reviewed under that title. Release charts from 5 Apr 1919 until 24 May 1919 included the film under the title Forbidden Fire as a state rights release available from J. Parker Read. No information has been located to confirm that the film was exhibited during this period. An ad appeared on 24 May 1919 announcing that the film, now called Sahara , would be released by W. W. Hodkinson Corp. through Pathé Exchange, Inc. It was announced that in addition to Schertzinger's orchestration, one by Dr. Hugo Reisenfeld would be available to exhibitors. In the reviews for Sahara , no mention was made that the film was the same as Forbidden Fire . The film was released under the title Sahara on 29 Jun 1919. While some sources refer to Allan Dwan as the film's director, most state that he "personally supervised" the film and that Arthur Rosson directed it. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
29 Mar 19
p. 1293.
MPN
4 Jan 19
p. 48.
MPN
29 Mar 19
p. 599.
MPN
31 May 19
p. 1381, 1383
MPW
29 Mar 19
p. 1840.
MPW
31 May 19
pp. 1371-72.
New York Times
30 Jun 19
p. 16.
Variety
4 Jul 19
p. 43.
Wid's
23 Mar 19
p. 23.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art titles
MUSIC
Mus accompaniment arr by
Mus accompaniment
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Stairway of the Stars
Forbidden Fire
Release Date:
29 June 1919
Copyright Claimant:
J. Parker Read, Jr.
Copyright Date:
16 April 1919
Copyright Number:
LP13603
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6-7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Parisian music hall celebrity Mignon marries young American civil engineer John Stanley. When John is suddenly assigned to undertake an engineering project in the Sahara, Mignon accompanies him and her son to the desert, although she is accustomed to a life of frivolity. After months of discontent, Mignon leaves her husband and son for Russian Baron Alexis, who establishes her in a palace in Cairo. John is brokenhearted, and becomes a drug addict. Mignon later runs across her husband and son who have become beggars. She is filled with remorse and goes back to the desert to nurse her husband. John recovers slowly, reconciles with his wife, and the family finds happiness ... +


Parisian music hall celebrity Mignon marries young American civil engineer John Stanley. When John is suddenly assigned to undertake an engineering project in the Sahara, Mignon accompanies him and her son to the desert, although she is accustomed to a life of frivolity. After months of discontent, Mignon leaves her husband and son for Russian Baron Alexis, who establishes her in a palace in Cairo. John is brokenhearted, and becomes a drug addict. Mignon later runs across her husband and son who have become beggars. She is filled with remorse and goes back to the desert to nurse her husband. John recovers slowly, reconciles with his wife, and the family finds happiness together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.