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HISTORY

Thomas A. Wise created the role of Senator Langdon on the Broadway stage. According to a news item in MPW , the first negatives and prints of this film were destroyed in a fire at the Eclair Studios in Fort Lee, NJ in Apr of ... More Less

Thomas A. Wise created the role of Senator Langdon on the Broadway stage. According to a news item in MPW , the first negatives and prints of this film were destroyed in a fire at the Eclair Studios in Fort Lee, NJ in Apr of 1914. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
MPN
31 Oct 14
p. 45.
MPN
30 Jan 15
p.30.
MPW
4 Apr 14
p.45.
MPW
24 Oct 14
p. 548.
NYDM
30 Sep 14
p. 32.
Variety
26 Sep 14
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play A Gentleman from Mississippi by Thomas A. Wise, Harrison Rhodes (New York, 28 Sep 1908).
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 October 1914
Copyright Claimant:
World Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
21 September 1914
Copyright Number:
LU3524
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

William H. Langdon, a widower and naïve junior Senator from Mississippi, moves to Washington, D.C. with his daughters, Caroline and Hope, and his son Randolph. Without Langdon's knowledge, his children have become the prey of the unscrupulous Congressman Norton, who is engaged to Caroline. Using money given to him by Caroline and Randolph, Norton secretly buys marshland property and proposes it as a site for a new naval base in Mississippi, planning to sell it at a highly inflated price to the federal government. When Langdon learns about the plan and his children's part in it, he exposes it on the Senate floor. The speech routs Norton and restores the confidence of Budd Haines, a former investigative reporter for The Washington Post and Langdon's secretary, who resumes his courtship of ... +


William H. Langdon, a widower and naïve junior Senator from Mississippi, moves to Washington, D.C. with his daughters, Caroline and Hope, and his son Randolph. Without Langdon's knowledge, his children have become the prey of the unscrupulous Congressman Norton, who is engaged to Caroline. Using money given to him by Caroline and Randolph, Norton secretly buys marshland property and proposes it as a site for a new naval base in Mississippi, planning to sell it at a highly inflated price to the federal government. When Langdon learns about the plan and his children's part in it, he exposes it on the Senate floor. The speech routs Norton and restores the confidence of Budd Haines, a former investigative reporter for The Washington Post and Langdon's secretary, who resumes his courtship of Hope. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.