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HISTORY

St. Elmo was filmed in Long Beach, CA.
       According to some sources, the D. Leonard credited in the Clune's Auditorium program was actually character actor Gus Leonard, AKA "Pop" ... More Less

St. Elmo was filmed in Long Beach, CA.
       According to some sources, the D. Leonard credited in the Clune's Auditorium program was actually character actor Gus Leonard, AKA "Pop" Leonard. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
MPN
11 Jul 14
p. 70.
MPW
20 Jun 14
p. 1676.
MPW
4 Jul 14
p 70.
Variety
28 Aug 14
p. 17.
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1914
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

CONCISE STORY OF ST. ELMO
       St. Elmo, the noble and high-minded young son of the gracious and wealthy wudow, Mrs. Murry, is devotedly attached to Murry Hammond, the clergyman;'s son. Since early boyhood they have plyed and studied together, and that comradeliness has developed into a strong, manly friendship.
       And now they both love the same girl, the beautiful but selfish and unscrupulous Agnes Hunt. She arrives in great state at the handsome home of Mrs. Murry and is soon besieged by three admirers. Agnes coquettes and flirts with each, even bestowing her graces upon the young men's superannuated tutor, Professor Pratt.
       Both St. Elmo and Murry Hammond write to Agnes, asking her to meet them. She receives these letters in her fastidious little boudoir as she is about to put the last touches to her charming morning toilet. The capricious Agnes loves Murry, but is determined to marry St. Elmo because he is wealthy.
       She saunters forth to meet Murry and tells him she will not marry him because he is poor. He begs her to be his wife, bt the unscrupulous coquette sends him away because she sees St. Elmo approaching.
       Crouching behind a boulder above them, the unhappy Murry watches St. Elmo and Agnes on the slope of the wooded hillside, and as he sees them kiss and embrace he is so maddened by jealousy that he raises a heavy stone to hurl down on his rival's head, when his hand is stayed by a vision of Christ.
       Notwithstanding their rivalry for the hand of Agnes, St. Elmo continues to care for Murry and promises to build him a church where ... +


CONCISE STORY OF ST. ELMO
       St. Elmo, the noble and high-minded young son of the gracious and wealthy wudow, Mrs. Murry, is devotedly attached to Murry Hammond, the clergyman;'s son. Since early boyhood they have plyed and studied together, and that comradeliness has developed into a strong, manly friendship.
       And now they both love the same girl, the beautiful but selfish and unscrupulous Agnes Hunt. She arrives in great state at the handsome home of Mrs. Murry and is soon besieged by three admirers. Agnes coquettes and flirts with each, even bestowing her graces upon the young men's superannuated tutor, Professor Pratt.
       Both St. Elmo and Murry Hammond write to Agnes, asking her to meet them. She receives these letters in her fastidious little boudoir as she is about to put the last touches to her charming morning toilet. The capricious Agnes loves Murry, but is determined to marry St. Elmo because he is wealthy.
       She saunters forth to meet Murry and tells him she will not marry him because he is poor. He begs her to be his wife, bt the unscrupulous coquette sends him away because she sees St. Elmo approaching.
       Crouching behind a boulder above them, the unhappy Murry watches St. Elmo and Agnes on the slope of the wooded hillside, and as he sees them kiss and embrace he is so maddened by jealousy that he raises a heavy stone to hurl down on his rival's head, when his hand is stayed by a vision of Christ.
       Notwithstanding their rivalry for the hand of Agnes, St. Elmo continues to care for Murry and promises to build him a church where he can preach when he becomes a minister.
       Mrs. Murry gives a grand ball to celebrate the engagement between St. Elmo and Agnes. In the midst of a graceful minuet Mrs. Murry calls a halt and, assisted by Parson Hammond, imposingly announces her son's betrothal.
       Utterly distracted by love and jealousy, Murry finds Agnes in the maze of dancers and leads her out into the verdant gardens. He entirely forgets his duty toward St. Elmo, forgets all but his overpowering passion for Agnes and covers her face with burning kisses.
       This is seen by St. Elmo's old colored Mammy and, angered by the deception to her young master, she tells him of what she has seen. St. Elmo can hardly credit his eyes. He approaches nearer, only to hear himself ridiculed and laughed at by the two he loved so well.
       Immediately his whole nature is transformed. His good and lofty soul passes completely out and his entire being is possessed of the devil. Thus changed into a mocking, cruel man, St. Elmo faces Murry and Agnes.
       He order his colored Mammy to bring his dueling pistols and, roughly pushing aside the weeping, pleading Agnes, he insists that Murry shall fight with him. At the first shot Murry is killed and the terrible news spreads consternation in the ballroom.
       From the moment the devil occupies St. Elmo it abides with him at all time and in all places. He is cruel, cynical and heartless, and jeers at everything good and beautiful. He wanders from place to place, and wherever he rides the shadows fall.
       For twenty years he lives this dissipated life. Then he accidentally meets the poor blacksmith's granddaughter, Edna Earle. She is a impel , unaffected slip of a girl of pue and lofty nature, hating wickedness with her whole soul.
       Edna Earle's grandfather dies and she leaves her poor little home and friends to seek work in the Georgia cotton mills. The train she takes is wrecked, and when Mrs. Murry hears of the accident she and the aged Dr. Hammond hasten to aid the victims.
       Edna is extricated unconscious from a pile of smoking debris and carried to the home of St. Elmo, and from that day Edna exerts an elevating and spiritual influence over the soul-racked man.
       He learns to love Edna and tells her the sad and terrible story of his life, at the hearing of which Edna shudders with horror and calls him a murderer, but through ernest prayers the soul of St. Elmo is regenerated. He determines to leave all behind for other lands, but as he reaches the ship another vision of Christ appears, and he follows it to a humble home filled with sick and starving. His presence in the pulpit brings delight to his family and friends and little Edna gives him her heart and hand.
       Thus endeth the story.

              Synopsis printed in the program for Clune's Audtorium in Los Angeles for the week of October 26th, 1914.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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