Director:

Lynn Reynolds

Writer:

Lynn Reynolds

Cinematographer:

Benny Kline

Production Company:

Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Referring to the picture as The Go Getter, the 1 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that popular actor Tom Mix had begun work at the Fox Film Corporation’s West Coast studios. Under the helm of writer-director Lynn Reynolds, location filming was expected to occur at the annual rodeo in Pendleton, OR, where many famous riders had already offered their assistance to Tom Mix. However, the 1 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News reported that exteriors were currently being shot at the Grand Canyon in AZ, and referred to the film as Go Get Her.
       The 22 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News announced that filming had completed at the Grand Canyon, and that cast and crew had returned to Hollywood to shoot the “final exteriors.”
       The Motion Picture News review from 31 Dec 1921 praised the picture as a “pictorial treat which is positively amazing in its scenic scope…the eye drinks in the landscape.” The finale’s aerial shots were given special mention, and the review wondered if Fox had used newsreel footage, even though it was undetectable. Three months earlier, the 10 Sep 1921 Moving Picture World announced that cameraman Blaine Walker was awarded a gold medal by Fox Film Corp. for his “enterprise and daring in obtaining the first motion pictures of the Grand Canyon” taken from an airplane. Noting the numerous air pockets within the canyon, the flight was deemed “perilous,” and the footage was later used for a newsreel. Tom Mix presented the award to Walker at a Fox Studios ceremony, as shown in a photograph published in the 17 Sep 1921 ... More Less

Referring to the picture as The Go Getter, the 1 Oct 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review announced that popular actor Tom Mix had begun work at the Fox Film Corporation’s West Coast studios. Under the helm of writer-director Lynn Reynolds, location filming was expected to occur at the annual rodeo in Pendleton, OR, where many famous riders had already offered their assistance to Tom Mix. However, the 1 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News reported that exteriors were currently being shot at the Grand Canyon in AZ, and referred to the film as Go Get Her.
       The 22 Oct 1921 Motion Picture News announced that filming had completed at the Grand Canyon, and that cast and crew had returned to Hollywood to shoot the “final exteriors.”
       The Motion Picture News review from 31 Dec 1921 praised the picture as a “pictorial treat which is positively amazing in its scenic scope…the eye drinks in the landscape.” The finale’s aerial shots were given special mention, and the review wondered if Fox had used newsreel footage, even though it was undetectable. Three months earlier, the 10 Sep 1921 Moving Picture World announced that cameraman Blaine Walker was awarded a gold medal by Fox Film Corp. for his “enterprise and daring in obtaining the first motion pictures of the Grand Canyon” taken from an airplane. Noting the numerous air pockets within the canyon, the flight was deemed “perilous,” and the footage was later used for a newsreel. Tom Mix presented the award to Walker at a Fox Studios ceremony, as shown in a photograph published in the 17 Sep 1921 Exhibitors Herald.
Sky High was reissued by the Fox Film Corporation in 1929. Main and subtitle cards were re-set for the updated version. According to the Catalogue of the Stories and Plays Owned by Fox Film Corporation. As of 1 Jul 1935, Fox Film Corporation owned all rights to the property.
       A restored version of Sky High screened at the Cinecon 52 film festival on 3 Sep 2016 at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood, CA. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
17 Sep 1921.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Oct 1921.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
31 Dec 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
1 Oct 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
22 Oct 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
31 Dec 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
10 Sep 1921.
---
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Go Getter
Go Get Her
Release Date:
22 January 1922
Copyright Claimant:
William Fox
Copyright Date:
15 January 1922
Copyright Number:
LP17480
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,546
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Grant Newburg, an immigration officer, is dispatched to uncover the men behind the smuggling of Chinese across the Mexican border. While Grant is scouting, he comes upon Estelle, who has become lost in the canyon while sight-seeing. He sets up a camp and steals some food for her, but he is captured and bound by Bates, the leader of the smugglers, who knows of his mission. With the aid of Estelle, he escapes and procures the assistance of a local sheriff and his posse. Meanwhile, Bates threatens Estelle, unaware that she is the niece of his employer, Jim Halloway. Newburg returns in an airplane, leaps into a stream, swims to the place where Estelle is being held captive, and rescues the girl. In time, her uncle is arrested for smuggling, and Grant promises to look after Estelle while Holloway serves his prison sentence. Romantic feelings soon develop between the ... +


Grant Newburg, an immigration officer, is dispatched to uncover the men behind the smuggling of Chinese across the Mexican border. While Grant is scouting, he comes upon Estelle, who has become lost in the canyon while sight-seeing. He sets up a camp and steals some food for her, but he is captured and bound by Bates, the leader of the smugglers, who knows of his mission. With the aid of Estelle, he escapes and procures the assistance of a local sheriff and his posse. Meanwhile, Bates threatens Estelle, unaware that she is the niece of his employer, Jim Halloway. Newburg returns in an airplane, leaps into a stream, swims to the place where Estelle is being held captive, and rescues the girl. In time, her uncle is arrested for smuggling, and Grant promises to look after Estelle while Holloway serves his prison sentence. Romantic feelings soon develop between the couple. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.