The Woman in the Case (1916)

Drama | 7 August 1916

Full page view
HISTORY

The 19 Feb 1916 Motion Picture News and 18 Mar 1916 Motography announced that Joseph Kaufman would direct an adaptation of Clyde Fitch’s famous play, The Woman in the Case, at the Lubin Manufacturing Company studios in Philadelphia, PA. Anthony P. Kelly was writing the script, and Ethel Clayton and E. K. Lincoln were set to star. The film never went into production, although Kaufman did direct several Famous Players films that year starring Pauline Frederick.
       Another film version of The Woman in the Case was completed that year by George Willoughby Photoplays in Australia, according to the 3 Jun 1916 Motion Picture News.
       The 29 Jul 1916 Moving Picture World reported that the Famous Players Film Company had completed The Woman in the Cage and another "big stage success," Under Cover. Publicists highlighted Pauline Frederick’s breach of the rules of stardom, not to mention theatrical tradition, when she decided to play “the less conspicuous role of Margaret Rolfe,” instead of the title character, “Claire Foster.” Miss Frederick declared that, after playing so many “heavy roles” in films, she “wanted a chance to play one that had real sympathetic appeal,” according to the 12 Aug 1916 Moving Picture World.
       Famous Players-Lasky remade The Woman in the Case in 1922 under the title The Law and the Woman, starring Betty Compson and directed by Penrhyn Stanlaws (see ... More Less

The 19 Feb 1916 Motion Picture News and 18 Mar 1916 Motography announced that Joseph Kaufman would direct an adaptation of Clyde Fitch’s famous play, The Woman in the Case, at the Lubin Manufacturing Company studios in Philadelphia, PA. Anthony P. Kelly was writing the script, and Ethel Clayton and E. K. Lincoln were set to star. The film never went into production, although Kaufman did direct several Famous Players films that year starring Pauline Frederick.
       Another film version of The Woman in the Case was completed that year by George Willoughby Photoplays in Australia, according to the 3 Jun 1916 Motion Picture News.
       The 29 Jul 1916 Moving Picture World reported that the Famous Players Film Company had completed The Woman in the Cage and another "big stage success," Under Cover. Publicists highlighted Pauline Frederick’s breach of the rules of stardom, not to mention theatrical tradition, when she decided to play “the less conspicuous role of Margaret Rolfe,” instead of the title character, “Claire Foster.” Miss Frederick declared that, after playing so many “heavy roles” in films, she “wanted a chance to play one that had real sympathetic appeal,” according to the 12 Aug 1916 Moving Picture World.
       Famous Players-Lasky remade The Woman in the Case in 1922 under the title The Law and the Woman, starring Betty Compson and directed by Penrhyn Stanlaws (see entry). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
19 Feb 1916
p. 986.
Motion Picture News
3 Jun 1916
p. 3411.
Motion Picture News
19 Aug 1916
p. 1095.
Motography
18 Mar 1916
p. 642.
Motography
19 Aug 1916
p. 452.
Moving Picture World
29 Jul 1916
p. 769.
Moving Picture World
12 Aug 1916
p. 1084.
Moving Picture World
19 Aug 1916
p. 1237.
New York Times
15 Feb 1916
pp. 110-11.
Wid's
10 Aug 1916
pp. 781-82.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Dir
WRITERS
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Woman in the Case by Clyde Fitch (New York, 31 Jan 1905).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
7 August 1916
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While studying in Paris, Julian Rolfe falls in love with fellow American Claire Foster, but is shocked to discover that his fiancée is a prostitute. Broken-hearted, Julian returns to America. He renews his friendship with gentle Margaret Hughes, a woman of noble character, and as time heals his wounds, he marries her. Meanwhile, Claire also returns home and sets her sights on Julian’s friend, Philip Long. The hapless Philip falls madly in love, and when Julian tries to warn his friend about Claire, Philip turns against him in anger. He marries Claire, but soon realizes that Julian was telling the truth. When he commits suicide in their apartment with Julian’s pistol, Claire takes advantage of the situation to get revenge on Julian by rearranging the scene. She blames Julian for murdering her husband, and he is arrested on circumstantial evidence and put on trial. To clear her husband, Margaret gains Claire's friendship by passing herself off as a fellow adventuress. She installs a dictograph in Claire’s apartment, gets her inebriated with wine, and elicits a confession that frees Julian from ... +


While studying in Paris, Julian Rolfe falls in love with fellow American Claire Foster, but is shocked to discover that his fiancée is a prostitute. Broken-hearted, Julian returns to America. He renews his friendship with gentle Margaret Hughes, a woman of noble character, and as time heals his wounds, he marries her. Meanwhile, Claire also returns home and sets her sights on Julian’s friend, Philip Long. The hapless Philip falls madly in love, and when Julian tries to warn his friend about Claire, Philip turns against him in anger. He marries Claire, but soon realizes that Julian was telling the truth. When he commits suicide in their apartment with Julian’s pistol, Claire takes advantage of the situation to get revenge on Julian by rearranging the scene. She blames Julian for murdering her husband, and he is arrested on circumstantial evidence and put on trial. To clear her husband, Margaret gains Claire's friendship by passing herself off as a fellow adventuress. She installs a dictograph in Claire’s apartment, gets her inebriated with wine, and elicits a confession that frees Julian from jail. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.