Stolen Orders (1918)

Drama | June 1918

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HISTORY

President Woodrow Wilson appears in the film delivering a speech. The film also contains documentary footage of war scenes taken on the Italian front from the Italian government. Marie Pagania could be Marie Pagano. The film had its premiere in New York on 2 Jun 1918. Many stars of the World Film Corp., which William A. Brady previously headed, were in the film. Actress Kitty Gordon sued William A. Brady and World Film Corp. because her name appeared on the film as a "featured" player along with Carlyle Blackwell, Montagu Love and June Elvidge. She claimed that her contract with World stipulated that she should have been billed as the "star," with her name above the title. World Film Corp., stated that they loaned Gordon to Brady for the production and thus were not at fault. Much of the film was shot in Atlantic City, NJ. Contemporary sources for the film listed actor Gunnis Davis as either James Gunnis Davis or James ... More Less

President Woodrow Wilson appears in the film delivering a speech. The film also contains documentary footage of war scenes taken on the Italian front from the Italian government. Marie Pagania could be Marie Pagano. The film had its premiere in New York on 2 Jun 1918. Many stars of the World Film Corp., which William A. Brady previously headed, were in the film. Actress Kitty Gordon sued William A. Brady and World Film Corp. because her name appeared on the film as a "featured" player along with Carlyle Blackwell, Montagu Love and June Elvidge. She claimed that her contract with World stipulated that she should have been billed as the "star," with her name above the title. World Film Corp., stated that they loaned Gordon to Brady for the production and thus were not at fault. Much of the film was shot in Atlantic City, NJ. Contemporary sources for the film listed actor Gunnis Davis as either James Gunnis Davis or James Davis. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
20 Apr 18
p. 1573.
ETR
15 Jun 18
pp. 80-81, 128
MPN
15 Jun 18
p. 3548, 3737
MPW
9 Mar 18
p. 1466.
MPW
24 Aug 18
p. 1157.
New York Times
3 Jun 18
p. 9.
NYDM
15 Jun 18
p. 851.
DETAILS
Release Date:
June 1918
Copyright Claimant:
Sealed Orders Motion Picture Corp.
Copyright Date:
8 June 1918
Copyright Number:
LU12562
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

John Le Page is about to drink poison so that his little daughter Ruth can collect his life insurance when two burglars break into his jewelry store. One of the thieves, Bill Cory, drinks the poison and dies, while the other, Joe Allen, is arrested for stealing jewels that Le Page actually had taken. Fifteen years later, during World War I, Le Page becomes attached to a German spy who plans to secure certain highly classified documents from Admiral Gaveston of the United States Navy. To this end, the spies invite Felicia Gaveston, the admiral's wife, to their luxurious gaming establishment, hoping that she will submit to her passion for gambling. Felicia loses so much that she agrees to steal the documents in order to conceal her losses. Lieutenant Dennis Gaveston, the admiral's brother, learns that Le Page is planning to transport the papers to Berlin via dirigible balloon and resolves to pursue him. Ruth, who loves Dennis, reluctantly accompanies her father in the balloon, and Dennis follows in a hydroplane. Le Page's accomplice reveals himself as the man who had served time for Le Page's crime, and in a fierce struggle, they both fall from the basket and drown. After Ruth parachutes to safety, she returns the documents to Dennis, the seal still ... +


John Le Page is about to drink poison so that his little daughter Ruth can collect his life insurance when two burglars break into his jewelry store. One of the thieves, Bill Cory, drinks the poison and dies, while the other, Joe Allen, is arrested for stealing jewels that Le Page actually had taken. Fifteen years later, during World War I, Le Page becomes attached to a German spy who plans to secure certain highly classified documents from Admiral Gaveston of the United States Navy. To this end, the spies invite Felicia Gaveston, the admiral's wife, to their luxurious gaming establishment, hoping that she will submit to her passion for gambling. Felicia loses so much that she agrees to steal the documents in order to conceal her losses. Lieutenant Dennis Gaveston, the admiral's brother, learns that Le Page is planning to transport the papers to Berlin via dirigible balloon and resolves to pursue him. Ruth, who loves Dennis, reluctantly accompanies her father in the balloon, and Dennis follows in a hydroplane. Le Page's accomplice reveals himself as the man who had served time for Le Page's crime, and in a fierce struggle, they both fall from the basket and drown. After Ruth parachutes to safety, she returns the documents to Dennis, the seal still unbroken. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.