The Yellow Ticket (1918)

Drama | 2 June 1918

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HISTORY

Among the other versions of Morton's play is the 1931 Fox film The Yellow Ticket , starring Elissa Landi and Laurence Olivier and directed by Raoul ... More Less

Among the other versions of Morton's play is the 1931 Fox film The Yellow Ticket , starring Elissa Landi and Laurence Olivier and directed by Raoul Walsh. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
27 Apr 18
backcover.
ETR
1 Jun 18
p. 2088.
MPN
8 Jun 18
p. 3399, 3452
MPW
23 Nov 18
p. 1978.
New York Times
27 May 18
p. 11.
Variety
24 May 18
p. 35.
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 June 1918
Copyright Claimant:
Pathé Exchange, inc.
Copyright Date:
7 May 1918
Copyright Number:
LU12373
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,970
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Under the reign of Czar Nicholas, Jews are persecuted mercilessly, and during a particularly violent raid, Anna Mirrel's mother is killed. Hearing that her father Isaac is dying in St. Petersburg, Anna applies for a passport to visit him but instead is given a "yellow ticket," a badge of dishonor worn by prostitutes and frequently given to young Jewish women by the police. After her father dies, Anna tries to escape the police, who now torment her, by assuming the name of her deceased friend, Marya Varenka, and living in the home of American diplomat Seaton as his daughter's tutor. There she befriends American journalist Julian Rolfe, but when the police discover her identity, Seaton turns her out. Baron Andrey, who had offered Anna protection, attacks her, whereupon she kills him and turns herself over to the police. Julian secures her release by threatening to create an international scandal, leaving the two free to plan a secure future in ... +


Under the reign of Czar Nicholas, Jews are persecuted mercilessly, and during a particularly violent raid, Anna Mirrel's mother is killed. Hearing that her father Isaac is dying in St. Petersburg, Anna applies for a passport to visit him but instead is given a "yellow ticket," a badge of dishonor worn by prostitutes and frequently given to young Jewish women by the police. After her father dies, Anna tries to escape the police, who now torment her, by assuming the name of her deceased friend, Marya Varenka, and living in the home of American diplomat Seaton as his daughter's tutor. There she befriends American journalist Julian Rolfe, but when the police discover her identity, Seaton turns her out. Baron Andrey, who had offered Anna protection, attacks her, whereupon she kills him and turns herself over to the police. Julian secures her release by threatening to create an international scandal, leaving the two free to plan a secure future in America. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.