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HISTORY

Bessie Barriscale was a stage actress who originally created the "Juanita" role in producer David Belasco's road production of Rose of the Rancho, according to the 8 Aug 1914 issues of Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World. This film was the first Belasco production with theJesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. The 22 Aug 1914 Motion Picture News reported that filming was progressing rapidly at Lasky's studios, "with an all-Belasco cast and Bessie Bariscale [sic] playing the part of Juanita." If footage was shot at this time, it may have been redone later (see entry).
       Although several publications, including the 10 Oct 1914 issues of both the Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World, reported that Theodore Roberts would be playing one of the featured roles, he was not listed in the final credits. Instead, he took the lead in another Lasky film, The Circus Man. The item further stated that director Cecil B. De Mille and a company of twenty-one actors filmed the previous week in Monterey, CA. Locations included the adobe Custom House, one of California’s oldest buildings, in the historic downtown section of Monterey, and the Padre’s Garden at the nearby Mission San Antonio de Padua. The motion picture company provided a donation for the privilege of shooting on the mission grounds. Filming was also done at the nearby historic Castro Rancho. The 3 Oct 1914 Variety had earlier reported that shooting was taking place in San Diego and at the mission at San Juan Capistrano, CA.
       The 10 Oct 1914 Moving Picture World reported the following: ...

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Bessie Barriscale was a stage actress who originally created the "Juanita" role in producer David Belasco's road production of Rose of the Rancho, according to the 8 Aug 1914 issues of Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World. This film was the first Belasco production with theJesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. The 22 Aug 1914 Motion Picture News reported that filming was progressing rapidly at Lasky's studios, "with an all-Belasco cast and Bessie Bariscale [sic] playing the part of Juanita." If footage was shot at this time, it may have been redone later (see entry).
       Although several publications, including the 10 Oct 1914 issues of both the Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World, reported that Theodore Roberts would be playing one of the featured roles, he was not listed in the final credits. Instead, he took the lead in another Lasky film, The Circus Man. The item further stated that director Cecil B. De Mille and a company of twenty-one actors filmed the previous week in Monterey, CA. Locations included the adobe Custom House, one of California’s oldest buildings, in the historic downtown section of Monterey, and the Padre’s Garden at the nearby Mission San Antonio de Padua. The motion picture company provided a donation for the privilege of shooting on the mission grounds. Filming was also done at the nearby historic Castro Rancho. The 3 Oct 1914 Variety had earlier reported that shooting was taking place in San Diego and at the mission at San Juan Capistrano, CA.
       The 10 Oct 1914 Moving Picture World reported the following: "The Lasky company has acquired a 4,000-acre ranch in the great San Fernando valley on which they have built a large two-story Spanish casa which is to be used in 'The Rose of the Rancho' which has just been started. The new ground is to be used for big scenes and where a large location is needed. A stock farm is to be maintained on the ranch. It is planned to use 500 people in the story. There will be 150 people transported through Southern California for the mission scenes. The studio will be used for the largest scene ever set up, the whole stage and ground space being utilized." The 31 Oct 1914 Motion Picture News added that exact replicas of the Castro Rancho and the Monterey Custom House were built on the ranch, "both of which are to be destroyed in the final scenes." According to the 24 Oct 1914 Motion Picture News, workmen built the rancho house and courtyard on a mammoth stage, where De Mille planned to use a new technique for "making moonlight scenes without the aid of tinting." The 31 Oct 1914 Moving Picture World reported that a hundred-and-thirty-six cast members were being transported daily to the Lasky ranch. "A chef is employed to feed the actors at noon, and some big scenes are being made."
       Preparing for the film, De Mille and his technical director, Wilfred Buckland, traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico, and engaged forty locals to appear in the film as "Vaqueros, Caballeros and Mexican Indians," all dressed in their own native costumes. Padre Francisca de la Vianna, head of the Monterey mission, also appeared in the picture, and performed a mock marriage ceremony between "Rose" and "Kearney." Playwright Richard Walton Tully also assisted in the production, but an item in the 26 Sep 1914 Variety's claim that he was directing was incorrect.
       Two reels of film were reshot "in order to introduce therein a Spanish saddle which was discovered shortly after the first part of the film had been finished, and in order to gain the atmospheric detail that this saddle would lend the picture," as noted in the 21 Nov 1914 Moving Picture World. It was also noted that "Mr. De Mille retook the first two thousand feet."
       The premiere was held on the evening of 15 Nov 1914 at the Belasco Theatre on West Forty-fourth Street in New York City. The movie opened at the Strand on Broadway two weeks later. Writing in the 28 Nov 1914 Motion Picture News, reviewer Willam A. Johnston joined the chorus of participants, including Belasco, who said that the film was better than the play. Hanford C. Judson, writing in the 12 Dec 1914 Moving Picture World, credited the film's advantage over the play to its California backgrounds and atmosphere, calling it "far too pretty in all ways and too thoroughly diverting to be anything but an emphatic success."
       Because of the film's extensive footage of California missions, Lasky pledged to donate the negative of Rose of the Rancho to the Smithsonian Institute. "The films [sic] will possess rare details of missions and mission life, which future generations can look upon as the actual depiction of California's oldest remaining relics of Spanish rule." However, the 21 Nov 1914 Variety declared, "Quite some portion of the picture is of the studio, and the interiors are not overwell done at any time."
       Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. was founded in Hollywood, CA, in late 1913 by Lasky, Samuel Goldfish (later Goldwyn), and Cecil B. DeMille. In 1936, IRose of the Rancho was remade in 1936 at Paramount Pictures by Marion Gering, starring John Boles (see entry).

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
8 Aug 1914
p. 51
Motion Picture News
22 Aug 1914
p. 51
Motion Picture News
10 Oct 1914
p. 39
Motion Picture News
24 Oct 1914
p. 39
Motion Picture News
31 Oct 1914
p. 34
Motion Picture News
21 Nov 1914
p. 27
Motion Picture News
28 Nov 1914
p. 41
Motography
13 Jun 1914
p. 435
Motography
17 Oct 1914
p. 532
Motography
5 Dec 1914
p. 785
Motography
12 Dec 1914
p. 829
Moving Picture World
8 Aug 1914
p. 847
Moving Picture World
3 Oct 1914
p. 67
Moving Picture World
10 Oct 1914
p. 198, 203
Moving Picture World
31 Oct 1914
p. 622
Moving Picture World
21 Nov 1914
p. 1078, 1080
Moving Picture World
28 Nov 1914
p. 1294
Moving Picture World
12 Dec 1914
p. 1501, 1531
New York Clipper
19 Sep 1914
p. 12
NYDM
14 Oct 1914
p. 28
NYDM
25 Nov 1914
p. 32
Variety
12 Sep 1914
p. 11
Variety
26 Sep 1914
p. 21
Variety
3 Oct 1914
p. 20
Variety
21 Nov 1914
p. 27
Variety
28 Nov 1914
p. 22
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 November 1914
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 15 Nov 1914 at the Belasco Theatre
Production Date:
Aug-Oct 1914
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co.
28 October 1914
LU3618
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In 1850, when California becomes the thirty-first state, the U. S. Federal Government decrees that all Spanish ranch owners must register their holdings, and the owners, resentful of the "gringos" who took California from Mexico, refuse to comply, which exposes their properties to land jumpers. Washington D.C. sends agent Kearney to investigate and convince the rancheros that it is in their best interest to register their deeds in order to avoid the claim jumpers. Ezra Kincaid, an outlaw, leads a band of outlaws to Señor Espinoza’s ranch to seize the property, and in the raid Espinoza is murdered and his daughter Isabelita, captured by a half-breed Indian, kills herself to avoid her fate. Meanwhile, Kearney sees Juanita, the “Rose” of the Castro rancho, and they become mutually attracted, although Juanita is engaged to wealthy ranch owner Don Luis del Torre. When Kearney discovers that Kincaid plans to seize the Castro ranch, he warns Juanita and her mother, but Señora Castro-Kenton, too defiant to believe a "gringo," refuses to register her property, even after Kearny enlists the local padre to convince her. During Juanita’s betrothal dance, Kearney is able to coerce Kincaid into delaying his raid, and the federal troops arrive from Monterey just in time. In the end, the ranch is saved, and Kearney and Juanita are ...

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In 1850, when California becomes the thirty-first state, the U. S. Federal Government decrees that all Spanish ranch owners must register their holdings, and the owners, resentful of the "gringos" who took California from Mexico, refuse to comply, which exposes their properties to land jumpers. Washington D.C. sends agent Kearney to investigate and convince the rancheros that it is in their best interest to register their deeds in order to avoid the claim jumpers. Ezra Kincaid, an outlaw, leads a band of outlaws to Señor Espinoza’s ranch to seize the property, and in the raid Espinoza is murdered and his daughter Isabelita, captured by a half-breed Indian, kills herself to avoid her fate. Meanwhile, Kearney sees Juanita, the “Rose” of the Castro rancho, and they become mutually attracted, although Juanita is engaged to wealthy ranch owner Don Luis del Torre. When Kearney discovers that Kincaid plans to seize the Castro ranch, he warns Juanita and her mother, but Señora Castro-Kenton, too defiant to believe a "gringo," refuses to register her property, even after Kearny enlists the local padre to convince her. During Juanita’s betrothal dance, Kearney is able to coerce Kincaid into delaying his raid, and the federal troops arrive from Monterey just in time. In the end, the ranch is saved, and Kearney and Juanita are married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.