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HISTORY

Hearts and Flowers was the first of only two motion pictures in which stage actress Mrs. Thomas Whiffen appeared. The second was Barbara Frietchie (1915, see entry). She was born Blanche Galton in England in 1845, and although she was widowed in 1897, she professionally maintained her married name. Cosmos Feature Film Corp. billed the sixty-nine-year-old actress as “The Grand Old Lady of the American Stage.”
       This was the second release from Cosmos Feature Film Co. Its first, Lena Rivers (1914, see entry) was adapted from a play by and starred Beulah Poynter, Whiffen's costar in Hearts and Flowers.
       The 7 Nov 1914 New York Clipper mentioned that the film’s exteriors were shot at Glendale Falls, MA, “one of the most interesting and picturesque spots in America.”
       An early advertisement in the 7 Nov 1914 Moving Picture World presented Hearts and Flowers as a State Rights film, but an article in the 28 Nov 1914 Movng Picture World announced that the Alliance Program would distribute the film exclusively, and that Cosmos would follow up with new five-reel motion pictures every six weeks.
       Various reviews gave varying summaries of the story; Ma Landers’ first name was either “Mary” or Martha,” the first name of Miss Poynter’s character was “Elsa” or “Elsie,” and the young couple was either engaged or married. ...

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Hearts and Flowers was the first of only two motion pictures in which stage actress Mrs. Thomas Whiffen appeared. The second was Barbara Frietchie (1915, see entry). She was born Blanche Galton in England in 1845, and although she was widowed in 1897, she professionally maintained her married name. Cosmos Feature Film Corp. billed the sixty-nine-year-old actress as “The Grand Old Lady of the American Stage.”
       This was the second release from Cosmos Feature Film Co. Its first, Lena Rivers (1914, see entry) was adapted from a play by and starred Beulah Poynter, Whiffen's costar in Hearts and Flowers.
       The 7 Nov 1914 New York Clipper mentioned that the film’s exteriors were shot at Glendale Falls, MA, “one of the most interesting and picturesque spots in America.”
       An early advertisement in the 7 Nov 1914 Moving Picture World presented Hearts and Flowers as a State Rights film, but an article in the 28 Nov 1914 Movng Picture World announced that the Alliance Program would distribute the film exclusively, and that Cosmos would follow up with new five-reel motion pictures every six weeks.
       Various reviews gave varying summaries of the story; Ma Landers’ first name was either “Mary” or Martha,” the first name of Miss Poynter’s character was “Elsa” or “Elsie,” and the young couple was either engaged or married.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
28 Nov 1914
p. 24.
Motion Picture News
9 Jan 1915
p. 57, 89.
Motography
12 Dec 1914
p. 828.
Moving Picture World
31 Oct 1914
p. 715.
Moving Picture World
7 Nov 1914
p. 826.
Moving Picture World
14 Nov 1914
p. 934.
Moving Picture World
28 Nov 1914
p. 1251.
Moving Picture World
19 Dec 1914
p. 1748.
Moving Picture World
23 Jan 1921
p. 72.
New York Clipper
7 Nov 1914
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 November 1914
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Cosmos Feature Film Corp.
2 November 1914
LP3804
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

New England farmers Jacob and Ma Landers’ spoiled son, Joseph, flees to the city after accidentally pushing a romantic rival, Walter Terry, over a cliff and fearing he might be dead. After the usual hardships, Joseph finds work with a stockbrokerage, catches “Wall Street fever,” and writes his mother asking for a $1,000 loan to set him up in his own business, promising to repay it quickly. Believing in her boy, Ma Landers sends him the money set aside to pay the monthly mortgage on the farm. Meanwhile, Jacob is killed in a hunting accident. Now penniless and in danger of losing the farm, Ma writes to her son, pleading for him to return the money, but in his shame he ignores her letters. Finally, evicted from her home, she goes to the city to visit Joseph at his place of business, but he sends her away, ashamed of her appearance, and tells Elsa Norman, a socialite with whom he is in love, that his mother is dead. Unknown to Joseph, his mother has become a cleaning woman in his office building, and is befriended by Elsa. One Christmas, Ma becomes ill in front of the office building, and Elsa drives her home to her estate and offers to buy back the farm. Now realizing Joseph's heartlessness and deception, Elsa breaks off the engagement, but Ma Landers intercedes and reconciles the ...

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New England farmers Jacob and Ma Landers’ spoiled son, Joseph, flees to the city after accidentally pushing a romantic rival, Walter Terry, over a cliff and fearing he might be dead. After the usual hardships, Joseph finds work with a stockbrokerage, catches “Wall Street fever,” and writes his mother asking for a $1,000 loan to set him up in his own business, promising to repay it quickly. Believing in her boy, Ma Landers sends him the money set aside to pay the monthly mortgage on the farm. Meanwhile, Jacob is killed in a hunting accident. Now penniless and in danger of losing the farm, Ma writes to her son, pleading for him to return the money, but in his shame he ignores her letters. Finally, evicted from her home, she goes to the city to visit Joseph at his place of business, but he sends her away, ashamed of her appearance, and tells Elsa Norman, a socialite with whom he is in love, that his mother is dead. Unknown to Joseph, his mother has become a cleaning woman in his office building, and is befriended by Elsa. One Christmas, Ma becomes ill in front of the office building, and Elsa drives her home to her estate and offers to buy back the farm. Now realizing Joseph's heartlessness and deception, Elsa breaks off the engagement, but Ma Landers intercedes and reconciles the two.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.