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HISTORY

This film was also released under the title The New Governor . Location scenes were filmed in Augusta, GA. According to the 1921 MPSD , Carey Lee was the author of this film. As Edgar Lewis is credited as scenarist in reviews, and the film was based on a play by Edward Brewster Sheldon, Lee's role is unclear. According to information in the NAACP Collection at the Library of Congress, the film was censored and passed by the National Board of Censorship on 20 Mar 1915, subject to the following changes and eliminations: the name of the film was changed to read " The New Governor , based on Sheldon's The Nigger "; a subtitle following the title card, which stated that an impossible gulf exists between the white and black races, was to be eliminated; a scene in which a drunken black man meets a little girl in the woods and attacks her was to be altered substantially; the scene of her brothers finding her was to be cut substantially; the subtitle "The Man Hunt" was to be cut; a close view of the black man being pulled from his horse and struggling with his captors was to be cut; the subtitle "Reaping the Penalty" was to be cut; and a scene in which the black man is shown tied to a tree with fire burning around him was to be cut ... More Less

This film was also released under the title The New Governor . Location scenes were filmed in Augusta, GA. According to the 1921 MPSD , Carey Lee was the author of this film. As Edgar Lewis is credited as scenarist in reviews, and the film was based on a play by Edward Brewster Sheldon, Lee's role is unclear. According to information in the NAACP Collection at the Library of Congress, the film was censored and passed by the National Board of Censorship on 20 Mar 1915, subject to the following changes and eliminations: the name of the film was changed to read " The New Governor , based on Sheldon's The Nigger "; a subtitle following the title card, which stated that an impossible gulf exists between the white and black races, was to be eliminated; a scene in which a drunken black man meets a little girl in the woods and attacks her was to be altered substantially; the scene of her brothers finding her was to be cut substantially; the subtitle "The Man Hunt" was to be cut; a close view of the black man being pulled from his horse and struggling with his captors was to be cut; the subtitle "Reaping the Penalty" was to be cut; and a scene in which the black man is shown tied to a tree with fire burning around him was to be cut substantially. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motog
27 Mar 15
p. 509.
MPN
6 Feb 15
p. 32.
MPN
13 Mar 15
pp. 10-11.
MPN
20 Mar 15
p. 39, 51
MPN
3 Apr 15
pp. 36-37.
MPN
17 Apr 15
p. 5.
MPW
24 Jul 15
p. 734.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITER
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Nigger by Edward Brewster Sheldon (New York, 4 Dec 1909).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The New Governor
Release Date:
29 March 1915
Copyright Claimant:
William Fox
Copyright Date:
5 April 1915
Copyright Number:
LP5235
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Philip Morrow, raised in aristocratic Southern society, is persuaded to run for governor by whiskey distiller and political boss Cliff Noyes. After winning the election, Governor Morrow decides to sign a prohibition bill that would ruin Noyes's liquor business. Furious, Noyes confronts Morrow with proof that the governor is of Negro ancestry and threatens to expose him in the newspaper. Realizing that he faces political ruin as well as the loss of his sweetheart, Georgiana Byrd, Governor Morrow bravely signs the bill and resigns his office. Georgiana begs to stay with him, but Morrow departs alone for a new life in the North, where he hopes to improve the plight of blacks in ... +


Philip Morrow, raised in aristocratic Southern society, is persuaded to run for governor by whiskey distiller and political boss Cliff Noyes. After winning the election, Governor Morrow decides to sign a prohibition bill that would ruin Noyes's liquor business. Furious, Noyes confronts Morrow with proof that the governor is of Negro ancestry and threatens to expose him in the newspaper. Realizing that he faces political ruin as well as the loss of his sweetheart, Georgiana Byrd, Governor Morrow bravely signs the bill and resigns his office. Georgiana begs to stay with him, but Morrow departs alone for a new life in the North, where he hopes to improve the plight of blacks in America. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.