The Gay Deceivers (1969)

R | 91 mins | Comedy | 2 July 1969

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HISTORY

The 17 Oct 1968 DV announced the acquisition of Gil Lasky and Abe Polsky’s original story by Fanfare Film Productions. Although they were initially expected to write the screenplay, the assignment went to Jerome Wish. Principal photography began 3 Mar 1969, as stated in a 7 Mar 1969 DV production chart.
       An article in the 9 Apr 1969 Var revealed that Fanfare planned to raise $400,000 by issuing 250,000 shares of common stock. The proceeds were allocated for the company’s outstanding 1968 tax debt, and for the budget of The Gay Deceivers. According to the 14 May 1969 Var, director Bruce Kessler was guaranteed a three percent share of net profits, Jerome Wish and star Kevin Couglin were given two-percent, with Gil Lasky and Abe Polsky receiving four percent.
       Additional cast members included Candy Rialson, Michelle Zola, Ginger Madden, and Traci Martin (5 Mar 1969 DV) ; and Len Henson, Larry Rogers, and Pete Franks (7 Mar 1969 DV). The 28 May 1969 DV attributed sound-effects mixing to Edit-Rite&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>Edit-Rite.
       The 11 Jun 1969 Var noted the film’s scheduled 25 Jun 1969 general release. Three weeks later, however, an item in the 2 Jul 1969 issue stated that the picture was debuting that day in Atlanta, GA, and San Francisco, CA. It was also noted that all locations in the Martin Theatre Circuit were expected to run the picture for the next two months.
       The Gay Deceivers opened 16 Jul 1969 in Los ... More Less

The 17 Oct 1968 DV announced the acquisition of Gil Lasky and Abe Polsky’s original story by Fanfare Film Productions. Although they were initially expected to write the screenplay, the assignment went to Jerome Wish. Principal photography began 3 Mar 1969, as stated in a 7 Mar 1969 DV production chart.
       An article in the 9 Apr 1969 Var revealed that Fanfare planned to raise $400,000 by issuing 250,000 shares of common stock. The proceeds were allocated for the company’s outstanding 1968 tax debt, and for the budget of The Gay Deceivers. According to the 14 May 1969 Var, director Bruce Kessler was guaranteed a three percent share of net profits, Jerome Wish and star Kevin Couglin were given two-percent, with Gil Lasky and Abe Polsky receiving four percent.
       Additional cast members included Candy Rialson, Michelle Zola, Ginger Madden, and Traci Martin (5 Mar 1969 DV) ; and Len Henson, Larry Rogers, and Pete Franks (7 Mar 1969 DV). The 28 May 1969 DV attributed sound-effects mixing to Edit-Rite&sortType=sortByExactMatch'>Edit-Rite.
       The 11 Jun 1969 Var noted the film’s scheduled 25 Jun 1969 general release. Three weeks later, however, an item in the 2 Jul 1969 issue stated that the picture was debuting that day in Atlanta, GA, and San Francisco, CA. It was also noted that all locations in the Martin Theatre Circuit were expected to run the picture for the next two months.
       The Gay Deceivers opened 16 Jul 1969 in Los Angeles, CA, and 30 Jul 1969 in New York City. Despite mixed reviews, the picture was listed in Var among the top fifty highest-grossing releases between 30 Jul 1969 and 17 Dec 1969.
       The film received an “R” rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). The 23 Jul 1969 Var noted that the Legion of Decency issued an “A-4” rating (suitable for adults, with reservations), explaining that some might take offense to sequences set in a gay bar, or to stereotyped portrayals of homosexual men. Five days earlier, DV had reported a demonstration by members of the Committee for the Freedom of Homosexuals outside the St. Francis Theatre in San Francisco, where the film had recently opened. One protester was quoted as saying that the picture “flaunts every sickening prejudice and misconception” about gay men, especially their purported lack of “manliness and patriotism.” A letter of protest from another committee member later appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle.
       A 22 Dec 1971 Var box-office report indicated that the picture continued its theatrical run for thirty months. On 9 Dec 1971, DV announced that the film was no longer banned in Australia, following a “year-long dispute” with the country’s censorship board.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
17 Oct 1968
p. 12.
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1969
p. 6.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1969
p. 12, 28.
Daily Variety
28 May 1969
p. 2, 12.
Daily Variety
5 Jun 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1971
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jul 1969
Section F, p. 11, 12.
New York Times
30 Jul 1969
p. 21.
New York Times
31 Jul 1969
p. 27.
Variety
9 Apr 1969
p. 32.
Variety
14 May 1969
p. 18.
Variety
11 Jun 1969
p. 30.
Variety
2 Jul 1969
p. 5, 19.
Variety
23 Jul 1969
p. 20.
Variety
30 Jul 1969
p. 15.
Variety
6 Aug 1969
p. 26.
Variety
20 Aug 1969
p. 10.
Variety
17 Dec 1969
p. 11.
Variety
22 Dec 1971
p. 62.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Scr supv
Casting dir
Prop master
Key grip
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 July 1969
Premiere Information:
San Francisco and Atlanta openings: 2 July 1969
Los Angeles opening: 16 July 1969
New York opening: 30 July 1969
Production Date:
began 3 March 1969
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
137
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Danny Devlin and his woman-chasing friend Elliot Crane decide to pose as homosexuals to avoid induction into the Army. As a result of interviews with Colonel Dixon and a psychiatrist, they are declared unfit. Since Danny is convinced that he and Elliot must appear to live together as homosexuals to confirm the Army's judgment, they rent a one-bedroom apartment in an area popular with the gay set. Their landlord, Malcolm, and his lover, Craig, attempt to make the "newlyweds" at home, but neither is comfortable in the new situation. When Elliot does a "campy" impersonation in the country club shower room, Danny's influential father has him fired from his job as lifeguard. Danny, meanwhile, has continued seeing his stewardess girl friend, Karen, but avoids bringing her to his new apartment. Eventually, Elliot's married and unmarried girl friends, Danny's father, and even Karen herself become convinced that the men are actually homosexual. In one final attempt to disprove the allegation, Danny's sister, Leslie, tries to get Elliot into bed with her, but the sight of a nearby Army officer renders him instantly impotent. Faced with dishonor and near ruin, the men return to Colonel Dixon and tell him that the whole situation was a ruse; but they have performed their roles too well, and the colonel refuses to allow them to enlist. The two part company, leaving Colonel Dixon free to cuddle up with his "assistant," Sergeant ... +


Danny Devlin and his woman-chasing friend Elliot Crane decide to pose as homosexuals to avoid induction into the Army. As a result of interviews with Colonel Dixon and a psychiatrist, they are declared unfit. Since Danny is convinced that he and Elliot must appear to live together as homosexuals to confirm the Army's judgment, they rent a one-bedroom apartment in an area popular with the gay set. Their landlord, Malcolm, and his lover, Craig, attempt to make the "newlyweds" at home, but neither is comfortable in the new situation. When Elliot does a "campy" impersonation in the country club shower room, Danny's influential father has him fired from his job as lifeguard. Danny, meanwhile, has continued seeing his stewardess girl friend, Karen, but avoids bringing her to his new apartment. Eventually, Elliot's married and unmarried girl friends, Danny's father, and even Karen herself become convinced that the men are actually homosexual. In one final attempt to disprove the allegation, Danny's sister, Leslie, tries to get Elliot into bed with her, but the sight of a nearby Army officer renders him instantly impotent. Faced with dishonor and near ruin, the men return to Colonel Dixon and tell him that the whole situation was a ruse; but they have performed their roles too well, and the colonel refuses to allow them to enlist. The two part company, leaving Colonel Dixon free to cuddle up with his "assistant," Sergeant Kravits. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.