Crack in the World (1965)

96 mins | Science fiction | 24 February 1965

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HISTORY

A 14 Mar 1963 DV article included Crack in the World among ten new Allied Artists projects to be produced by Philip Yordan through his Security Pictures banner. However, nearly a year passed before development began to move ahead, as the 27 Feb 1964 DV announced Yordan was negotiating a new deal to distribute through Paramount Pictures. On 4 Mar 1964, LAT reported that Crack in the World had been pushed up in Yordan’s schedule following a commitment from director Andrew Marton.
       Principal photography began in Madrid, Spain, on 29 Apr 1964, as stated in a 15 May 1964 DV production chart. According to the 5 Aug 1964 Var, the three-month shoot took place at CEA Studios in Madrid, and on various locations around Spain. An article in the 27 May 1964 Var detailed the construction of the biggest set ever built at the studio up to that time—the $100,000 “Central Operations” facility, which crewmembers built with the assistance of National Cash Register Electronics, Xerox Corp., and engineers from Westrex Sound Services, Inc. German scientist Dr. Ernst Von Hyter also allegedly served as a technical advisor to oversee deployment of the electronic and scientific instruments while Alex Weldon worked on special effects. Although the 24 Jun 1964 Var announced that star Dana Andrews had already completed his role in the film, the 15 Jul 1964 edition referred to an extra two weeks of shooting that was required in the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain. Production wrapped in the final week of Jul 1964.
       The picture began a ... More Less

A 14 Mar 1963 DV article included Crack in the World among ten new Allied Artists projects to be produced by Philip Yordan through his Security Pictures banner. However, nearly a year passed before development began to move ahead, as the 27 Feb 1964 DV announced Yordan was negotiating a new deal to distribute through Paramount Pictures. On 4 Mar 1964, LAT reported that Crack in the World had been pushed up in Yordan’s schedule following a commitment from director Andrew Marton.
       Principal photography began in Madrid, Spain, on 29 Apr 1964, as stated in a 15 May 1964 DV production chart. According to the 5 Aug 1964 Var, the three-month shoot took place at CEA Studios in Madrid, and on various locations around Spain. An article in the 27 May 1964 Var detailed the construction of the biggest set ever built at the studio up to that time—the $100,000 “Central Operations” facility, which crewmembers built with the assistance of National Cash Register Electronics, Xerox Corp., and engineers from Westrex Sound Services, Inc. German scientist Dr. Ernst Von Hyter also allegedly served as a technical advisor to oversee deployment of the electronic and scientific instruments while Alex Weldon worked on special effects. Although the 24 Jun 1964 Var announced that star Dana Andrews had already completed his role in the film, the 15 Jul 1964 edition referred to an extra two weeks of shooting that was required in the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain. Production wrapped in the final week of Jul 1964.
       The picture began a citywide engagement in the Los Angeles area on 24 Feb 1965, and the 2 Mar 1965 DV reported a first-week gross of $110,000 from twenty-five theaters. According to a 24 Mar 1965 Var article, the New York City showcase release scheduled for 31 Mar 1965 was delayed until 12 May 1965, when it debuted as a double-feature with A Boy Ten Feet Tall (1965, see entry).
       Although Julian Halevy was given co-credit for the screenplay when the film was initially released, according to official WGA records, Halevy was a pseudonym for writer Julian Zimet. The WGA changed the screenplay credit to read: "Screenplay by Jon Manchip White and Julian Zimet." More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1963
p. 19.
Daily Variety
27 Feb 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 May 1964
p. 8.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Mar 1965
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
4 Mar 1964
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
22 Feb 1965
Section C, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1965
Section C, p. 12.
New York Times
13 May 1965
p. 32.
Variety
27 May 1964
p. 15.
Variety
24 Jun 1964
p. 20.
Variety
15 Jul 1964
p. 2.
Variety
5 Aug 1964
p. 20.
Variety
24 Mar 1965
p. 4.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 February 1965
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 24 February 1965
New York opening: 12 May 1965
Production Date:
29 April--late July 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Security Pictures
Copyright Date:
31 December 1964
Copyright Number:
LP29816
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
96
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dr. Stephen Sorensen, an aging scientist dying of cancer, is head of Project Inner Space, a plan to expose the earth's core (magma) as a new source of energy. Against the advice of his wife, Maggie, and his associate, geologist Ted Rampion, Sorensen explodes a powerful atomic bomb. The blast cracks the rock layer surrounding the magma, but the scientists' happiness over the success of the project is short-lived when it is learned that earthquakes have erupted along the volatile Macebo Fault. With the help of Maggie, Rampion concludes that the only way to stop the reaction is by detonating another bomb. The second explosion is set off inside a volcano, but the crack created by the first explosion merely reverses its course, threatening to split the earth. Sorensen tricks Rampion and Maggie into leaving him behind, and they escape just as a large wedge of earth flies into space to form another ... +


Dr. Stephen Sorensen, an aging scientist dying of cancer, is head of Project Inner Space, a plan to expose the earth's core (magma) as a new source of energy. Against the advice of his wife, Maggie, and his associate, geologist Ted Rampion, Sorensen explodes a powerful atomic bomb. The blast cracks the rock layer surrounding the magma, but the scientists' happiness over the success of the project is short-lived when it is learned that earthquakes have erupted along the volatile Macebo Fault. With the help of Maggie, Rampion concludes that the only way to stop the reaction is by detonating another bomb. The second explosion is set off inside a volcano, but the crack created by the first explosion merely reverses its course, threatening to split the earth. Sorensen tricks Rampion and Maggie into leaving him behind, and they escape just as a large wedge of earth flies into space to form another moon. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.