The Savage Guns (1962)

84 mins | Western | August 1962

Director:

Michael Carreras

Writer:

Edmund Morris

Cinematographer:

Alfredo Fraile

Production Designer:

Francisco Canet

Production Companies:

Capricorn Productions , TECISA
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HISTORY

In her 20 Aug 1962 LAT column, Hedda Hopper praised Columbia Pictures for its upcoming worldwide release of the anti-communism documentary, We'll Bury You! The title was a quote from Premier Nikita Khrushchev of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), who predicted that communism would ultimately triumph over capitalism. Hopper claimed in her 2 Nov 1962 LAT column that she was responsible for Columbia acquiring the independent production, initially titled The Challenge.
       The picture opened 24 Oct 1962 in New York City to mixed reviews. While the 9 Oct 1962 DV called it "an adroit and enterprising job of compilation and execution," the 25 Oct 1962 NYT noted the omission of important facts and a lack of "historical insight." Because the opening coincided with the thirteen-day Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, gross receipts within the first week totaled $16,000. The film was also endorsed by the National Catholic Welfare Council, according to the 5 Nov 1962 DV. The 7 Nov 1962 Var noted that it was one of three recent anti-communist releases, suggesting a trend among movie producers, several of whom had also made documentaries and exposés about the Nazi Party.
       By early 1963, enthusiasm for We'll Bury You! had waned considerably, evidenced by Hopper's 21 Feb 1963 LAT column, in which she admonished the public for its disinterest. Hopper also noted that Columbia went to great expenses in publicizing the documentary, including $50,000 spent in New York City. On 8 May 1963, Var announced ... More Less

In her 20 Aug 1962 LAT column, Hedda Hopper praised Columbia Pictures for its upcoming worldwide release of the anti-communism documentary, We'll Bury You! The title was a quote from Premier Nikita Khrushchev of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), who predicted that communism would ultimately triumph over capitalism. Hopper claimed in her 2 Nov 1962 LAT column that she was responsible for Columbia acquiring the independent production, initially titled The Challenge.
       The picture opened 24 Oct 1962 in New York City to mixed reviews. While the 9 Oct 1962 DV called it "an adroit and enterprising job of compilation and execution," the 25 Oct 1962 NYT noted the omission of important facts and a lack of "historical insight." Because the opening coincided with the thirteen-day Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, gross receipts within the first week totaled $16,000. The film was also endorsed by the National Catholic Welfare Council, according to the 5 Nov 1962 DV. The 7 Nov 1962 Var noted that it was one of three recent anti-communist releases, suggesting a trend among movie producers, several of whom had also made documentaries and exposés about the Nazi Party.
       By early 1963, enthusiasm for We'll Bury You! had waned considerably, evidenced by Hopper's 21 Feb 1963 LAT column, in which she admonished the public for its disinterest. Hopper also noted that Columbia went to great expenses in publicizing the documentary, including $50,000 spent in New York City. On 8 May 1963, Var announced that Columbia had decided to take the picture out of circulation. In addition to low box-office receipts, the company was reacting to the murder of a messenger in Quito, Ecuador, who was delivering a print of the film to a theater. Screenings would thereafter be limited to "schools, educational groups and the like." The cost of producing the documentary was estimated at $200,000 to $300,000.
       A review in the 31 Oct 1962 Var noted similarities between We'll Bury You! and the German-French production, La Lutte Finale (1962), although the latter film was much less critical of the current Soviet regime.
       Released in Spain in Oct 1962 as Tierra brutal . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
14 Dec 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
11 Dec 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Dec 1962
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
15 Dec 1961
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
5 Dec 1962
Section D, p. 14.
Variety
26 Apr 1961
p. 108.
Variety
11 Oct 1961
p. 22.
Variety
31 Jan 1962
p. 16.
Variety
26 Sep 1962
p. 8, 18.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Tierra brutal
The Brutal Land
Release Date:
August 1962
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 5 December 1962
Production Date:
began 23 October 1961
Copyright Claimant:
Capricorn Productions
Copyright Date:
31 December 1962
Copyright Number:
LP24328
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
MetroScope
Duration(in mins):
84
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1870 Mexico, wounded gunman Steve Fallon takes refuge at the ranch of ex-Confederate officer Mike Summers and his wife, Franchea. A romance develops between Fallon and Franchea's sister, Juana. Ortega, a ruthless landowner, is trying to take over all the ranches in the valley, by force if necessary. Any resistance is eliminated by his henchman, Danny Post, and his gang of mercenaries. Upon learning that Summers refuses to carry a gun because of all the bloodshed he saw in the Civil War, Fallon decides to stay and help put an end to Ortega's reign of terror. When Danny tries to collect "protection" money from Summers, Fallon disarms and thrashes him. After a second meeting with Fallon, in which three of the mercenaries are killed, the cowardly Danny leaves town. Ortega and the remnants of his gang then raid the Summers ranch and leave Fallon with his hands crippled. Believing Fallon dead, Danny returns, kills Ortega, takes over his holdings, and then proceeds to the Summers ranch. When he sees the helpless Fallon, he draws his gun, but Summers appears and shoots Danny to save his friend's life. Fallon decides to settle down with ... +


In 1870 Mexico, wounded gunman Steve Fallon takes refuge at the ranch of ex-Confederate officer Mike Summers and his wife, Franchea. A romance develops between Fallon and Franchea's sister, Juana. Ortega, a ruthless landowner, is trying to take over all the ranches in the valley, by force if necessary. Any resistance is eliminated by his henchman, Danny Post, and his gang of mercenaries. Upon learning that Summers refuses to carry a gun because of all the bloodshed he saw in the Civil War, Fallon decides to stay and help put an end to Ortega's reign of terror. When Danny tries to collect "protection" money from Summers, Fallon disarms and thrashes him. After a second meeting with Fallon, in which three of the mercenaries are killed, the cowardly Danny leaves town. Ortega and the remnants of his gang then raid the Summers ranch and leave Fallon with his hands crippled. Believing Fallon dead, Danny returns, kills Ortega, takes over his holdings, and then proceeds to the Summers ranch. When he sees the helpless Fallon, he draws his gun, but Summers appears and shoots Danny to save his friend's life. Fallon decides to settle down with Juana. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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