Africa--Texas Style! (1967)

110 mins | Adventure | 2 June 1967

Director:

Andrew Marton

Writer:

Andy White

Producer:

Andrew Marton

Production Designer:

Maurice Fowler

Production Companies:

Vantors Films, Ivan Tors Productions
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HISTORY

On 7 Jan 1966, DV reported that Andy White had just signed a producing-screenwriting deal with Ivan Tors Productions for Cowboy in Africa. White was due to leave for Nairobi, Kenya, in mid-Jan 1966 to conduct a months’ worth of research before writing the screenplay. Principal photography began several months later, on 1 Aug 1966, as noted in a 5 Aug 1966 DV production chart. Filming took place entirely in Kenya. The 12 May 1967 DV review stated that “actual scenes of roping such animals as wildebeest, elans, zebras, buffalo and many others” were shot, in addition to a staged rhinoceros attack. Filmmakers were said to have “full support” from several African game agencies.
       The production was independently financed by Ivan Tors, who paid over $1 million, according to items in the 28 Sep 1966 and 15 Feb 1967 Var. Paramount Pictures came on board to distribute as part of a “longrange agreement” recently established with Tors, the 5 Oct 1966 Var noted.
       A title change to Africa—Texas Style! was announced in the 7 Mar 1967 DV. Tors retained the original title for a television series based on the film. The show, Cowboy in Africa, aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from 11 Sep 1967 to 1 Apr 1968. An article in the 14 Jun 1967 Var later claimed that the film project had originally been planned as a television pilot for ABC, but had been “beefed up” to a feature-length motion picture following Tors’s deal with Paramount.
       The world premiere was scheduled for 2 Jun ... More Less

On 7 Jan 1966, DV reported that Andy White had just signed a producing-screenwriting deal with Ivan Tors Productions for Cowboy in Africa. White was due to leave for Nairobi, Kenya, in mid-Jan 1966 to conduct a months’ worth of research before writing the screenplay. Principal photography began several months later, on 1 Aug 1966, as noted in a 5 Aug 1966 DV production chart. Filming took place entirely in Kenya. The 12 May 1967 DV review stated that “actual scenes of roping such animals as wildebeest, elans, zebras, buffalo and many others” were shot, in addition to a staged rhinoceros attack. Filmmakers were said to have “full support” from several African game agencies.
       The production was independently financed by Ivan Tors, who paid over $1 million, according to items in the 28 Sep 1966 and 15 Feb 1967 Var. Paramount Pictures came on board to distribute as part of a “longrange agreement” recently established with Tors, the 5 Oct 1966 Var noted.
       A title change to Africa—Texas Style! was announced in the 7 Mar 1967 DV. Tors retained the original title for a television series based on the film. The show, Cowboy in Africa, aired on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from 11 Sep 1967 to 1 Apr 1968. An article in the 14 Jun 1967 Var later claimed that the film project had originally been planned as a television pilot for ABC, but had been “beefed up” to a feature-length motion picture following Tors’s deal with Paramount.
       The world premiere was scheduled for 2 Jun 1967 at Wometco’s 163rd Street Theatre in Miami, FL, as stated in a 31 May 1967 Var brief. A European premiere was set to follow in London, England, on 8 Jun 1967, according to the 7 Jun 1967 Var. Los Angeles, CA, and New York City openings occurred on 5 Jul 1967 and 12 Jul 1967, respectively. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
5 Aug 1966
p. 8.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 Mar 1967
p. 3.
Daily Variety
12 May 1967
p. 3.
Emporia Gazette [Emporia, Kansas}
2 Jun 1967
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
22 Mar 1966
Section C, p. 1, 10.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1967
Section C, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jul 1967
Section C, p. 6.
New York Times
13 Jul 1967.
---
Variety
29 Jun 1966
p. 5.
Variety
21 Sep 1966
p. 17.
Variety
28 Sep 1966
p. 26.
Variety
5 Oct 1966
p. 14.
Variety
15 Feb 1967
p. 7.
Variety
31 May 1967
p. 61.
Variety
7 Jun 1967
p. 18.
Variety
14 Jun 1967
p. 17.
Variety
21 Jun 1967
p. 10.
Variety
21 Jun 1967
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Ivan Tors Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
1st & 2nd asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Lighting cam
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward master
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
Sd mix
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Prod secy
Casting dir
Stills
Prop master
Supv elec
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Cowboy in Africa
Release Date:
2 June 1967
Premiere Information:
Miami, Florida, opening: 2 June 1967
Emporia, Kansas opening: 7 June 1967 at the Fox Granada Theatre
Los Angeles opening: 5 July 1967
Production Date:
began 1 August 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Vantors Films
Copyright Date:
2 June 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34702
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
110
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Howard Hayes, an English rancher in modern-day Kenya, believes that food can be provided for the starving Masai natives by the herding and domestication of wild game. To help prove his point, he imports two American cowboys, rodeo champion Jim Sinclair and his companion, John Henry, a Navajo Indian. Opposition to the plan comes from Karl Bekker, a cattle rancher who fears that disease from the wild animals may infect his prize cattle. Despite Bekker's interference, the efforts of the two cowboys prove successful; the wild animals quickly adapt to their confinement, and the prospect of breeding them in captivity becomes a reality. During his stay, Jim meets local doctor Hugo Copp, his attractive nurse Fay Carter, and Sampson, a native boy who dreams of going to school in the United States. On the eve of the cowboys' scheduled departure, Bekker opens the animals' pens and drives them into the wilderness. Jim sets out after them, but he is thrown from his horse and attacked by a charging rhinoceros. Sampson helps distract the beast until Jim can rope and tie it. Bekker makes a last attempt to frighten off the now-domesticated wild game, but he is arrested, and the animals return to their corrals. Jim decides to stay in Africa and marry Fay, and John Henry ends up driving the new school bus, with little Sampson as one of his ... +


Howard Hayes, an English rancher in modern-day Kenya, believes that food can be provided for the starving Masai natives by the herding and domestication of wild game. To help prove his point, he imports two American cowboys, rodeo champion Jim Sinclair and his companion, John Henry, a Navajo Indian. Opposition to the plan comes from Karl Bekker, a cattle rancher who fears that disease from the wild animals may infect his prize cattle. Despite Bekker's interference, the efforts of the two cowboys prove successful; the wild animals quickly adapt to their confinement, and the prospect of breeding them in captivity becomes a reality. During his stay, Jim meets local doctor Hugo Copp, his attractive nurse Fay Carter, and Sampson, a native boy who dreams of going to school in the United States. On the eve of the cowboys' scheduled departure, Bekker opens the animals' pens and drives them into the wilderness. Jim sets out after them, but he is thrown from his horse and attacked by a charging rhinoceros. Sampson helps distract the beast until Jim can rope and tie it. Bekker makes a last attempt to frighten off the now-domesticated wild game, but he is arrested, and the animals return to their corrals. Jim decides to stay in Africa and marry Fay, and John Henry ends up driving the new school bus, with little Sampson as one of his passengers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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