Armored Command (1961)

105 mins | Melodrama | 2 August 1961

Director:

Byron Haskin

Writer:

Ron W. Alcorn

Producer:

Ron W. Alcorn

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Production Designer:

Hans Berthel

Production Company:

Allied Artists
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HISTORY

The 2 May 1960 issues of DV and LAT announced that Allied Artists and writer-producer Ron W. Alcorn had teamed to make Armored Command, a WWII picture to be directed by Byron Haskin in the Alsace-Lorraine region of Germany and France. Allied financed the picture for roughly $1 million, according to a 15 Feb 1961 Var article.
       Principal photography began in Germany on 21 Nov 1960, as indicated in a 25 Nov 1960 DV production chart. The 28 Dec 1960 Var stated that the bulk of filming took place at the Hohenfels army camp in Hohenfels, Germany. The U.S. Army cooperated with the production by providing an estimated 150 soldiers stationed in Germany to serve as background actors. Although the filmmakers did not pay the service members, who were assigned by the Army to work on the film, Alcorn insisted that contributions had been made to “unit funds.” The use of soldiers on films had been protested two years earlier, as noted in Var, when Alcorn had also used U.S. Army members in the television show Citizen Soldier.
       Sometime during production, several cast members, including Earl Holliman, were reportedly locked in a cellar by a gang of protestors who did not want foreigners in Germany. An item in the 23 Apr 1961 LAT stated that the actors were released from the cellar unharmed but shaken.
       Nearly one year after the film was theatrically released, the 11 Jul 1962 Var reported that Colonel Daniel H. Hudelson had sued Allied Artists for $350,000, alleging the company had appropriated ... More Less

The 2 May 1960 issues of DV and LAT announced that Allied Artists and writer-producer Ron W. Alcorn had teamed to make Armored Command, a WWII picture to be directed by Byron Haskin in the Alsace-Lorraine region of Germany and France. Allied financed the picture for roughly $1 million, according to a 15 Feb 1961 Var article.
       Principal photography began in Germany on 21 Nov 1960, as indicated in a 25 Nov 1960 DV production chart. The 28 Dec 1960 Var stated that the bulk of filming took place at the Hohenfels army camp in Hohenfels, Germany. The U.S. Army cooperated with the production by providing an estimated 150 soldiers stationed in Germany to serve as background actors. Although the filmmakers did not pay the service members, who were assigned by the Army to work on the film, Alcorn insisted that contributions had been made to “unit funds.” The use of soldiers on films had been protested two years earlier, as noted in Var, when Alcorn had also used U.S. Army members in the television show Citizen Soldier.
       Sometime during production, several cast members, including Earl Holliman, were reportedly locked in a cellar by a gang of protestors who did not want foreigners in Germany. An item in the 23 Apr 1961 LAT stated that the actors were released from the cellar unharmed but shaken.
       Nearly one year after the film was theatrically released, the 11 Jul 1962 Var reported that Colonel Daniel H. Hudelson had sued Allied Artists for $350,000, alleging the company had appropriated material he had submitted to them in 1954, based on his experiences as a U.S. Army commander in the Vosges Mountains in France during WWII.
       Fernando Lamas was listed as a cast member in the 28 Dec 1960 Var, and Almut Frolich served as Tina Louise’s stand-in, as noted in the 16 Dec 1960 DV. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 May 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Oct 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Nov 1960
p. 6.
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1961
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
2 May 1960
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
23 Apr 1961
Section L, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
22 Sep 1961
Section A, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
30 Sep 1961
Section A, p. 9.
New York Times
7 Oct 1961
p. 14.
Variety
28 Dec 1960
p. 54.
Variety
25 Jan 1961
p. 13.
Variety
15 Feb 1961
p. 24.
Variety
11 Jul 1962
p. 19.
DETAILS
Release Date:
2 August 1961
Premiere Information:
Omaha, NE, opening: 2 August 1961
Los Angeles opening: 27 September 1961
New York opening: 6 October 1961
Production Date:
began 21 November 1960
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists
Copyright Date:
28 July 1961
Copyright Number:
LP19929
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
105
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In northeastern France, during World War II, a U.S. Army patrol finds a wounded girl, Alexandra, lying on a road in the Vosges Mountains. Unaware that she is a German spy, they move her into an abandoned house and nurse her back to health. She quickly ingratiates herself with the men, offers her services as an interpreter to Army Intelligence, and then passes what information she picks up to the German espionage network. Consequently, the unit is unable to detect any Germans in the area, although the group commander, Colonel Devlin, is certain they are present. Eventually, two German soldiers are captured, and they reveal that a large German force is nearby. When Colonel Devlin learns that Alexandra has been working for Intelligence, he becomes suspicious of her and orders his men to prepare for an attack. The Germans attempt to create disturbances by seeing to it that cognac is made available to the American soldiers, but Devlin has the liquor confiscated. A short time later, the Germans attack; and Alexandra joins in the battle, killing two American soldiers with a shotgun. When young Sergeant Mike, who has fallen in love with Alexandra, sees her shoot Skee, his rival for her affections, he kills her with a blast of machine-gun fire. Reinforcements soon arrive to drive off the enemy and help Devlin hold his ... +


In northeastern France, during World War II, a U.S. Army patrol finds a wounded girl, Alexandra, lying on a road in the Vosges Mountains. Unaware that she is a German spy, they move her into an abandoned house and nurse her back to health. She quickly ingratiates herself with the men, offers her services as an interpreter to Army Intelligence, and then passes what information she picks up to the German espionage network. Consequently, the unit is unable to detect any Germans in the area, although the group commander, Colonel Devlin, is certain they are present. Eventually, two German soldiers are captured, and they reveal that a large German force is nearby. When Colonel Devlin learns that Alexandra has been working for Intelligence, he becomes suspicious of her and orders his men to prepare for an attack. The Germans attempt to create disturbances by seeing to it that cognac is made available to the American soldiers, but Devlin has the liquor confiscated. A short time later, the Germans attack; and Alexandra joins in the battle, killing two American soldiers with a shotgun. When young Sergeant Mike, who has fallen in love with Alexandra, sees her shoot Skee, his rival for her affections, he kills her with a blast of machine-gun fire. Reinforcements soon arrive to drive off the enemy and help Devlin hold his position. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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