Bachelor in Paradise (1961)

109 mins | Comedy | November 1961

Director:

Jack Arnold

Producer:

Ted Richmond

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Editor:

Richard Farrell

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Hans Peters

Production Company:

Ted Richmond Productions
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HISTORY

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) production chief Sol C. Siegel recruited Bob Hope to star in Bachelor in Paradise, according to the 9 Dec 1959 LAT. The project, based on Vera Caspary’s original story, had been in development since 1957, as indicated by an 8 Nov 1957 DV item. On 17 Feb 1960, LAT reported that George Marshall would direct, but Marshall did not remain with the project. Likewise, Charles Lederer was identified as the screenwriter in the 3 Oct 1960 DV, but by early Feb 1961, Valentine Davies and Hal Kanter had been hired to complete the script, as noted in the 28 Feb 1961 DV.
       Principal photography began on 8 May 1961, according to a DV brief published the following day. Filming began at a “60-acre housing development” in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles County, CA. The 12 May 1961 DV stated that the subdivision was located in Woodland Hills, and that production was scheduled to move to the MGM studio lot in Culver City, CA, on 15 May 1961. Further location shooting took place at Wrigley Field in South Los Angeles, CA, and in Panorama City, CA, at a supermarket which shut down for filming but was permitted to run a promotion that awarded one of its customers a walk-on role, according to items in the 6 Jun 1961 and 16 Jun 1961 DV.
       While filming was underway, actress D. J. Thompson suffered a broken arm after slipping and falling in her dressing room, as reported in the 31 May 1961 DV. Thompson, who had been ... More Less

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) production chief Sol C. Siegel recruited Bob Hope to star in Bachelor in Paradise, according to the 9 Dec 1959 LAT. The project, based on Vera Caspary’s original story, had been in development since 1957, as indicated by an 8 Nov 1957 DV item. On 17 Feb 1960, LAT reported that George Marshall would direct, but Marshall did not remain with the project. Likewise, Charles Lederer was identified as the screenwriter in the 3 Oct 1960 DV, but by early Feb 1961, Valentine Davies and Hal Kanter had been hired to complete the script, as noted in the 28 Feb 1961 DV.
       Principal photography began on 8 May 1961, according to a DV brief published the following day. Filming began at a “60-acre housing development” in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles County, CA. The 12 May 1961 DV stated that the subdivision was located in Woodland Hills, and that production was scheduled to move to the MGM studio lot in Culver City, CA, on 15 May 1961. Further location shooting took place at Wrigley Field in South Los Angeles, CA, and in Panorama City, CA, at a supermarket which shut down for filming but was permitted to run a promotion that awarded one of its customers a walk-on role, according to items in the 6 Jun 1961 and 16 Jun 1961 DV.
       While filming was underway, actress D. J. Thompson suffered a broken arm after slipping and falling in her dressing room, as reported in the 31 May 1961 DV. Thompson, who had been cast in the role of “Housewife,” was replaced by Mary Treen. The 21 Jun 1961 DV also noted that leading actress Lana Turner injured her toe during production, prompting screenwriters to add a scene in which her character bumped her toe, to allow the actress to limp in subsequent scenes and therefore avoid any production delays.
       Following a successful preview screening, the 5 Oct 1961 LAT noted that MGM had already given producer Ted Richmond “the go-ahead” to begin work on a sequel. Screenwriter Hal Kanter was enlisted to write the follow-up, titled An Armful of Girls.
       A world premiere was scheduled to take place on 2 Nov 1961 in London, England, as stated in the 27 Oct 1961 DV and 1 Nov 1961 Var. Bob Hope was due to attend the charity event at the London Coliseum. Further European screenings to be attended by Hope were set to follow closely in Dublin, Ireland and Glasgow, Scotland.
       Henry Mancini and Mack David received an Academy Award nomination for Music (Song) for the title tune, “Bachelor In Paradise,” and a Golden Globe Award nomination went to Bob Hope for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy.
       The following actors and actresses were listed as cast members in DV items published between 11 May 1961 and 28 Jun 1961: Tracy Stratford; Sean Peters; Eddie Rosson; radio disc jockey Dick Whitinghill; Los Angeles Dodgers announcers Vin Scully and Jerry Doggett; Joy Monroe; Lisa Simone; and Lisa Seagram. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1957
p. 3.
Daily Variety
3 Oct 1960
p. 6.
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 May 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
11 May 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 May 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 May 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
16 May 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
19 May 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
26 May 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
31 May 1961
p. 5.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1961
p. 5.
Daily Variety
16 Jun 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jun 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
28 Jun 1961
p. 11.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
31 Oct 1961
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
9 Dec 1959
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1960
Section B, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
5 Oct 1961
Section B, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
21 Dec 1961
Section B, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
26 Dec 1961
Section C, pp. 8-9.
New York Times
2 Nov 1961
p. 43.
New York Times
17 Nov 1961
p. 41.
Variety
1 Nov 1961
p. 2, 74.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Miss Turner's hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Main titles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Bachelor in Paradise," words by Mack David, music by Henry Mancini.
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1961
Premiere Information:
London premiere: 2 November 1961
Chicago opening: week of 7 November 1961
New York opening: 16 November 1961
Los Angeles opening: 25 December 1961
Production Date:
began 8 May 1961
Copyright Claimant:
Ted Richmond Productions
Copyright Date:
23 October 1961
Copyright Number:
LP20447
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
109
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Adam J. Niles, a writer noted for his series of racy books on the sexual mores of foreign peoples, finds himself in debt to the Internal Revenue Service because of a dishonest personal manager. Forbidden to leave the U.S., he changes his name, moves into Paradise Village, a California housing development, and secretly begins compiling material for a book on how Americans live. The only bachelor in the community, he quickly becomes the center of attention among the bored housewives. Though his activities are watched with suspicion by Rosemary Howard, the community's secretary, Adam organizes a discussion group in which he advises the women on how to bring romance back into their lives. When the jealous husbands try to have him evicted, Rosemary, who has finally been won over, quits her job and becomes Adam's secretary. Eventually Adam's tax problems are solved, but in the process his true identity is revealed, and he is involved in three Paradise Village divorce suits. Aided by Rosemary's testimony and the enthusiastic support of three wives, Adam persuades the presiding female judge of his innocence. The three wives return to their husbands, and Adam declares his love for ... +


Adam J. Niles, a writer noted for his series of racy books on the sexual mores of foreign peoples, finds himself in debt to the Internal Revenue Service because of a dishonest personal manager. Forbidden to leave the U.S., he changes his name, moves into Paradise Village, a California housing development, and secretly begins compiling material for a book on how Americans live. The only bachelor in the community, he quickly becomes the center of attention among the bored housewives. Though his activities are watched with suspicion by Rosemary Howard, the community's secretary, Adam organizes a discussion group in which he advises the women on how to bring romance back into their lives. When the jealous husbands try to have him evicted, Rosemary, who has finally been won over, quits her job and becomes Adam's secretary. Eventually Adam's tax problems are solved, but in the process his true identity is revealed, and he is involved in three Paradise Village divorce suits. Aided by Rosemary's testimony and the enthusiastic support of three wives, Adam persuades the presiding female judge of his innocence. The three wives return to their husbands, and Adam declares his love for Rosemary. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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