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HISTORY

The 26 Feb 1916 Motion Picture News reported that production was underway “at the Selig zoo studios” in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 15 Apr 1916 Motography, some location filming may have also taken place in a mountainous region of Tennessee, as the mountains were described as “delighting features.” It was noted in the 25 Mar 1916 Motography that producer William Robert Daly had previously appeared in a stage production of the 1897 play by David K. Higgins, upon which the film was based.
       A scheduled May 1916 release was announced in the 8 Apr 1916 Motography. Distribution was to be handled by the V-L-S-E, Inc., a partnership between production companies Vitagraph, Lubin, Selig, and Essanay. The item credited William Robert Daly with the adaptation. A review in the 20 Apr 1916 Motography claimed that Daly also directed.
       At Piney Ridge opened 1 May 1916 to mostly positive critical notices, although the 12 May 1916 Var asserted that the picture was “a very gloomy affair” not well suited to the screen. Contemporary reviews disagree on whether Cindy returns to a former lover at the film's end.
       The 23 Sep 1916 Motion Picture News reported that a new exchange partnership, headed by producer George Kleine in association with the Edison, Selig, and Essanay companies, was taking over distribution of the film. Various sources revealed that the Lubin Manufacturing Company had gone out of business earlier that ... More Less

The 26 Feb 1916 Motion Picture News reported that production was underway “at the Selig zoo studios” in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 15 Apr 1916 Motography, some location filming may have also taken place in a mountainous region of Tennessee, as the mountains were described as “delighting features.” It was noted in the 25 Mar 1916 Motography that producer William Robert Daly had previously appeared in a stage production of the 1897 play by David K. Higgins, upon which the film was based.
       A scheduled May 1916 release was announced in the 8 Apr 1916 Motography. Distribution was to be handled by the V-L-S-E, Inc., a partnership between production companies Vitagraph, Lubin, Selig, and Essanay. The item credited William Robert Daly with the adaptation. A review in the 20 Apr 1916 Motography claimed that Daly also directed.
       At Piney Ridge opened 1 May 1916 to mostly positive critical notices, although the 12 May 1916 Var asserted that the picture was “a very gloomy affair” not well suited to the screen. Contemporary reviews disagree on whether Cindy returns to a former lover at the film's end.
       The 23 Sep 1916 Motion Picture News reported that a new exchange partnership, headed by producer George Kleine in association with the Edison, Selig, and Essanay companies, was taking over distribution of the film. Various sources revealed that the Lubin Manufacturing Company had gone out of business earlier that month. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
26 Feb 1916
p. 1141
Motion Picture News
29 Apr 1916
p. 2558
Motion Picture News
23 Sep 1916
p. 1837
Motion Picture Studio Directory and Trade Annual
21 Oct 1916
p. 64, 99
Motography
25 Mar 1916
p. 718
Motography
8 Apr 1916
p. 804
Motography
29 Apr 1916
p. 1000
Motography
13 May 1916
p. 1119
Moving Picture World
18 Mar 1916
p. 1850
Moving Picture World
6 May 1916
p. 982, 1049
NYDM
29 Apr 1916
p. 29
Variety
12 May 1916
p. 19
Wid's Daily
27 Apr 1916
pp. 538-39
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Selig Red Seal Play
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play At Piney Ridge by David K. Higgins (New York, 22 Feb 1897).
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 May 1916
Production Date:
February--March 1916
Copyright Claimant:
Selig Polyscope Co.
Copyright Date:
8 April 1916
Copyright Number:
LP8049
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Cindy Lane becomes pregnant, Mark Brierson, the father, refuses to marry her. Instead, Brierson romances Azalia Deering, whose father, General Deering, owns the town bank. Brierson misuses bank funds, but the bank is saved by Jack Rose, a wealthy farmer. Cindy's father Zeb vows to kill her lover, but she refuses to reveal the man's identity. Brierson realizes that Azalia and Jack love each other, and so, to eliminate his rival, he tells Zeb that Jack is the child's father. To disgrace Jack further, Brierson convinces Dagmar, a black woman, to claim Jack as her son, but Zeb is told that Brierson is the father of Cindy's child and is also Dagmar's son. In the end, Zeb kills Brierson, who, before he dies, learns from Dagmar that although she is not his mother, he is black. Jack marries Azalia, and Cindy, whose child has died, goes back to the man she loved before ... +


When Cindy Lane becomes pregnant, Mark Brierson, the father, refuses to marry her. Instead, Brierson romances Azalia Deering, whose father, General Deering, owns the town bank. Brierson misuses bank funds, but the bank is saved by Jack Rose, a wealthy farmer. Cindy's father Zeb vows to kill her lover, but she refuses to reveal the man's identity. Brierson realizes that Azalia and Jack love each other, and so, to eliminate his rival, he tells Zeb that Jack is the child's father. To disgrace Jack further, Brierson convinces Dagmar, a black woman, to claim Jack as her son, but Zeb is told that Brierson is the father of Cindy's child and is also Dagmar's son. In the end, Zeb kills Brierson, who, before he dies, learns from Dagmar that although she is not his mother, he is black. Jack marries Azalia, and Cindy, whose child has died, goes back to the man she loved before Brierson. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.