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HISTORY

The picture was announced in the 19 May 1917 Motography as the second screen production starring renowned stage actress, Edna Goodrich, under her contract with John R. Freuler, president of Mutual Film Corp. The original story was written by Edward M. Stanton, Assistant U.S. District Attorney for New York City, who conducted the government’s battle against Asian drug smugglers. The 1 Sep 1917 Motography attributed the scenario to Anthony Kelly. An article in the 18 Aug 1917 Moving Picture World reported that production had recently been completed at Empire All-Star Studio in New York City. Various sources credited Sol Polito as cameraman.
       Queen X was released 1 Oct 1917. Despite positive reviews, a Motion Picture News survey of U.S. exhibitors revealed that the film garnered only average public interest. Results were published in the 5 Jan 1918 issue.
       That same day, Moving Picture World reported that Chinese-American actor George D. Gee was found murdered in his Brooklyn, NY, home. Gee, an informant for Stanton, was cast as the managing director for federal government’s campaign against illegal narcotics. According to the article, Gee’s appearance in the film may have identified him to members of the opium trade, who were offering $500 for his murder. Stanton attributed much of the success of his operation to information supplied by ... More Less

The picture was announced in the 19 May 1917 Motography as the second screen production starring renowned stage actress, Edna Goodrich, under her contract with John R. Freuler, president of Mutual Film Corp. The original story was written by Edward M. Stanton, Assistant U.S. District Attorney for New York City, who conducted the government’s battle against Asian drug smugglers. The 1 Sep 1917 Motography attributed the scenario to Anthony Kelly. An article in the 18 Aug 1917 Moving Picture World reported that production had recently been completed at Empire All-Star Studio in New York City. Various sources credited Sol Polito as cameraman.
       Queen X was released 1 Oct 1917. Despite positive reviews, a Motion Picture News survey of U.S. exhibitors revealed that the film garnered only average public interest. Results were published in the 5 Jan 1918 issue.
       That same day, Moving Picture World reported that Chinese-American actor George D. Gee was found murdered in his Brooklyn, NY, home. Gee, an informant for Stanton, was cast as the managing director for federal government’s campaign against illegal narcotics. According to the article, Gee’s appearance in the film may have identified him to members of the opium trade, who were offering $500 for his murder. Stanton attributed much of the success of his operation to information supplied by Gee.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
20 Oct 1917
pp. 1592-1593
Motion Picture News
6 Oct 1917
p. 2345, 2355
Motion Picture News
5 Jan 1918
p. 75
Motography
19 May 1917
p. 1065
Motography
11 Aug 1917
p. 302
Motography
1 Sep 1917
p. 443
Motography
29 Sep 1917
p. 691
Motography
13 Oct 1917
p. 785
Moving Picture World
18 Aug 1917
p. 1098
Moving Picture World
6 Oct 1917
p. 43, 99, 126
Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1917
p. 1480
Moving Picture World
5 Jan 1918
p. 57
Wid's Daily
11 Oct 1917
p. 656
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mutual Star Production; Edna Goodrich Series; "Big Stars Only" Series
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 October 1917
Production Date:
ended August 1917
Copyright Claimant:
Mutual Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1917
Copyright Number:
LP11988
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York's notorious Pell Street district, U.S. District Attorney Arnold Somers' men capture Queen X, known to drug smugglers as "The Queen of Chinatown," a woman with a cross-shaped birthmark on her wrist. Summers recognizes her as Janice Waltham, formerly a prominent society woman. After becoming an addict and dealer, Janice was imprisoned in underground dens filled with opium fumes to prevent her from recovering and betraying her suppliers. She refuses to name her associates despite third degree questioning. As Janice is about to be sentenced to a long prison term, Miriam Evans, whose brother George is the assistant district attorney, recognizes Janice as the former schoolmate who rescued her in a convent fire. Somers allows Miriam to take Janice home and advises George to court her to get the names of the gang leaders. With George's help, Janice develops enough will power to kick her drug habit, while George, according to their pact, stops smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee. After George secures the names, Janice, threatened by a Chinese cohort, learns about George's deal, but George, now in love, confesses this and they ... +


In New York's notorious Pell Street district, U.S. District Attorney Arnold Somers' men capture Queen X, known to drug smugglers as "The Queen of Chinatown," a woman with a cross-shaped birthmark on her wrist. Summers recognizes her as Janice Waltham, formerly a prominent society woman. After becoming an addict and dealer, Janice was imprisoned in underground dens filled with opium fumes to prevent her from recovering and betraying her suppliers. She refuses to name her associates despite third degree questioning. As Janice is about to be sentenced to a long prison term, Miriam Evans, whose brother George is the assistant district attorney, recognizes Janice as the former schoolmate who rescued her in a convent fire. Somers allows Miriam to take Janice home and advises George to court her to get the names of the gang leaders. With George's help, Janice develops enough will power to kick her drug habit, while George, according to their pact, stops smoking cigarettes and drinking coffee. After George secures the names, Janice, threatened by a Chinese cohort, learns about George's deal, but George, now in love, confesses this and they marry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.