Brushfire! (1962)

80 mins | Adventure | 21 February 1962

Director:

Jack Warner Jr.

Producer:

Jack Warner Jr.

Cinematographer:

Edward Fitzgerald

Editor:

Roy Livingston

Production Designer:

Theobold Holsopple

Production Company:

Obelisk, Inc.
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HISTORY

The 30 Jun 1961 NYT announced that producer-director Jack M. Warner, known as Jack Warner, Jr., was planning his first independent feature film, to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA, over a period of ten days. Warner, the estranged son of Warner Bros. Studios president Jack L. Warner, raised the $150,000 budget from his own funds and contributions from friends. He admitted to starting production without a distributor, and hoped to find one after filming was completed. The 21 Jun 1961 DV identified Sentinel Hills in Humboldt County, NV, as "the location site for guerilla warfare action." Principal photography began that day, according to the 23 Jun 1961 issue. The 27 Jun 1961 DV noted that actor Ray Heindeck was added to the cast.
       Following the end of production, the 14 Aug 1961 DV reported that composer Irving Gertz would begin recording his score eight days later. Warner, meanwhile, was on his way to New York City in search of a distributor. On 25 Aug 1961, DV stated that a distribution deal would be finalized within the next ten days. The title was temporarily changed to Brushfire War, according to the 11 Oct 1961 edition. On 15 Nov 1961, Var revealed that Warner made an outright sale of the film to Paramount Pictures.
       Brushfire! opened 21 Feb 1962 in New York City, and on 18 Apr 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. Despite scathing reviews, the picture earned a profit, due to its double billing with Blue ... More Less

The 30 Jun 1961 NYT announced that producer-director Jack M. Warner, known as Jack Warner, Jr., was planning his first independent feature film, to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA, over a period of ten days. Warner, the estranged son of Warner Bros. Studios president Jack L. Warner, raised the $150,000 budget from his own funds and contributions from friends. He admitted to starting production without a distributor, and hoped to find one after filming was completed. The 21 Jun 1961 DV identified Sentinel Hills in Humboldt County, NV, as "the location site for guerilla warfare action." Principal photography began that day, according to the 23 Jun 1961 issue. The 27 Jun 1961 DV noted that actor Ray Heindeck was added to the cast.
       Following the end of production, the 14 Aug 1961 DV reported that composer Irving Gertz would begin recording his score eight days later. Warner, meanwhile, was on his way to New York City in search of a distributor. On 25 Aug 1961, DV stated that a distribution deal would be finalized within the next ten days. The title was temporarily changed to Brushfire War, according to the 11 Oct 1961 edition. On 15 Nov 1961, Var revealed that Warner made an outright sale of the film to Paramount Pictures.
       Brushfire! opened 21 Feb 1962 in New York City, and on 18 Apr 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. Despite scathing reviews, the picture earned a profit, due to its double billing with Blue Hawaii (1961, see entry) in New York City, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962, see entry) in Los Angeles.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
21 Jun 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1961
p. 14.
Daily Variety
14 Aug 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
11 Oct 1961
p. 7.
Daily Variety
1 Feb 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1962
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
18 Apr 1962
Section C, p. 12.
New York Times
30 Jun 1961
p. 32.
New York Times
22 Feb 1962
p. 20.
Variety
15 Nov 1961
p. 70.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod--story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Brushfire War
Release Date:
21 February 1962
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 February 1962
Los Angeles opening: 18 April 1962
Production Date:
21 June--early July 1961
Copyright Claimant:
Obelisk, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 January 1962
Copyright Number:
LP21461
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
80
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Southeast Asia, guerrilla rebels kidnap an American couple, Easter and Tony Banford, and hold them for a ransom of guns and ammunition. Realizing that the rebels must be stopped, Chevern McCase, a former World War II guerrilla fighter, joins his friend Jeff Saygure in organizing a rescue party. While they are leading a team of plantation workers to the rebel headquarters, Easter is brutally raped by Martin, the guerrilla leader, as Tony watches helplessly. Eventually Chevern and his men reach the guerrilla headquarters, destroy their radio communications, and rescue the young couple. As they make their getaway by sampan, Martin and the rebels attack. Tony hastily misfires when he sees Martin about to shoot Jeff and is himself killed by a blast from the enemy leader's gun. Jeff counters by hurling a hand grenade at Martin and killing him. Seeing their leader fall, the guerrillas flee in disorganized retreat. Jeff then consoles Easter and explains that the rescue effort was worth the cost because it kept the uprising from developing into a fullscale ... +


In Southeast Asia, guerrilla rebels kidnap an American couple, Easter and Tony Banford, and hold them for a ransom of guns and ammunition. Realizing that the rebels must be stopped, Chevern McCase, a former World War II guerrilla fighter, joins his friend Jeff Saygure in organizing a rescue party. While they are leading a team of plantation workers to the rebel headquarters, Easter is brutally raped by Martin, the guerrilla leader, as Tony watches helplessly. Eventually Chevern and his men reach the guerrilla headquarters, destroy their radio communications, and rescue the young couple. As they make their getaway by sampan, Martin and the rebels attack. Tony hastily misfires when he sees Martin about to shoot Jeff and is himself killed by a blast from the enemy leader's gun. Jeff counters by hurling a hand grenade at Martin and killing him. Seeing their leader fall, the guerrillas flee in disorganized retreat. Jeff then consoles Easter and explains that the rescue effort was worth the cost because it kept the uprising from developing into a fullscale revolt. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.