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HISTORY

The film was originally titled The Royal Northwest Mounted, according to a 14 Jul 1960 DV item, which announced that Burt Kennedy would write and direct the picture for Associated Producers, Inc. and Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. At the time, Kennedy was said to be en route to Canada with Associated Producers executive Harry Spaulding to scout locations and studio space in Toronto. While in Canada, the two aimed to enlist the cooperation of the Canadian Mounted Police.
       Principal photography began on 23 Sep 1960, as noted in a 21 Oct 1960 DV production chart. Shooting took place entirely in Canada, using Canadian and British crew members, and thus qualified for the British Film Fund’s Eady plan. According to the 23 Nov 1960 DV, it was one of few American films to be shot in Canada under the British funding program, to that time. Some location scenes were filmed in the Cyprus Hills of Saskatchewan, Canada.
       Post-production was underway by late Nov 1960 in London, England.
       The world premiere was scheduled to take place in Canada on 15 Feb 1961, as noted in a 15 Dec 1960 DV news brief. Following a Buffalo, NY, opening on 22 Feb 1961, the picture was slated for release in Los Angeles, CA, on 24 May 1961, according to the 18 May 1961 LAT.
       The Canadians marked Burt Kennedy’s feature film directorial debut. ... More Less

The film was originally titled The Royal Northwest Mounted, according to a 14 Jul 1960 DV item, which announced that Burt Kennedy would write and direct the picture for Associated Producers, Inc. and Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. At the time, Kennedy was said to be en route to Canada with Associated Producers executive Harry Spaulding to scout locations and studio space in Toronto. While in Canada, the two aimed to enlist the cooperation of the Canadian Mounted Police.
       Principal photography began on 23 Sep 1960, as noted in a 21 Oct 1960 DV production chart. Shooting took place entirely in Canada, using Canadian and British crew members, and thus qualified for the British Film Fund’s Eady plan. According to the 23 Nov 1960 DV, it was one of few American films to be shot in Canada under the British funding program, to that time. Some location scenes were filmed in the Cyprus Hills of Saskatchewan, Canada.
       Post-production was underway by late Nov 1960 in London, England.
       The world premiere was scheduled to take place in Canada on 15 Feb 1961, as noted in a 15 Dec 1960 DV news brief. Following a Buffalo, NY, opening on 22 Feb 1961, the picture was slated for release in Los Angeles, CA, on 24 May 1961, according to the 18 May 1961 LAT.
       The Canadians marked Burt Kennedy’s feature film directorial debut. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1960
p. 6.
Daily Variety
1 Sep 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1960
p. 6.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1960
p. 6.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1960
p. 4.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1961
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
18 May 1961
Section C, p. 15.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward (see note)
Ward (see note)
MUSIC
Mus comp
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"This Is Canada," "Sioux Lullaby" and "The Night," words and music by Ken Darby.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Royal Northwest Mounted
Release Date:
February 1961
Premiere Information:
Canadian premiere: 15 February 1961
Buffalo, New York, opening: 22 February 1961
Los Angeles opening: 24 May 1961
Production Date:
began 23 September 1960
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Productions
Copyright Date:
24 February 1961
Copyright Number:
LP18880
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
85
Countries:
Canada, United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The Sioux Indians, led by Chief Four Horns, flee to Canada following the slaughter of General Custer's troops at Little Big Horn. They are intercepted by Inspector William Gannon of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, who tells them that they may remain in Canada provided they obey the laws. The Indians agree, but trouble arises when Montana rancher Frank Boone and three of his gunmen come north to recover some horses they believe were stolen by the Indians. When Boone and the gunmen massacre a small village of Sioux and abduct a white squaw, the Mounties, fearful of reprisal by the Sioux, quickly take the marauders into custody; however, they escape, taking the white squaw as hostage. The Mounties pursue them, and in the gun battle that follows, the woman is killed while saving Gannon's life. The escaping men then reach the top of Buffalo Cliffs. There they are confronted by the Sioux, who start a horse stampede and drive Boone and his men over the edge of the cliff. With peace restored, the Mounties return to their ... +


The Sioux Indians, led by Chief Four Horns, flee to Canada following the slaughter of General Custer's troops at Little Big Horn. They are intercepted by Inspector William Gannon of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, who tells them that they may remain in Canada provided they obey the laws. The Indians agree, but trouble arises when Montana rancher Frank Boone and three of his gunmen come north to recover some horses they believe were stolen by the Indians. When Boone and the gunmen massacre a small village of Sioux and abduct a white squaw, the Mounties, fearful of reprisal by the Sioux, quickly take the marauders into custody; however, they escape, taking the white squaw as hostage. The Mounties pursue them, and in the gun battle that follows, the woman is killed while saving Gannon's life. The escaping men then reach the top of Buffalo Cliffs. There they are confronted by the Sioux, who start a horse stampede and drive Boone and his men over the edge of the cliff. With peace restored, the Mounties return to their headquarters. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.