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HISTORY

According to the 13 Apr 1918 Exhibitors Herald, actress Virginia Pearson was working on her latest production at the time, provisionally titled The Fires of Hate. Filming continued into the following month under its official title, The Firebrand , as noted in the 4 May 1918 Motography. The location was identified as Fox Film Co. studios in Brooklyn, NY. That same day, Exhibitors Herald anticipated the conclusion of principal photography within the next two days.
       The Firebrand opened 19 May 1918 to tepid reviews. Although critics highlighted the film’s compelling action and notable performances, some considered director Edmund Lawrence’s melodramatic approach to the Russian Revolution to be unrealistic and stylistically dated. Box-office reports in the 27 Jul 1918 Motion Picture News indicated that the film was attracting average business.
       The 29 Jun 1918 Exhibitors Herald listed several sequences removed by the Chicago, IL, Board of Censors. Among them were scenes involving drunkenness, one in which “Princess Natalya” shot her husband, and another in which her breasts were briefly ... More Less

According to the 13 Apr 1918 Exhibitors Herald, actress Virginia Pearson was working on her latest production at the time, provisionally titled The Fires of Hate. Filming continued into the following month under its official title, The Firebrand , as noted in the 4 May 1918 Motography. The location was identified as Fox Film Co. studios in Brooklyn, NY. That same day, Exhibitors Herald anticipated the conclusion of principal photography within the next two days.
       The Firebrand opened 19 May 1918 to tepid reviews. Although critics highlighted the film’s compelling action and notable performances, some considered director Edmund Lawrence’s melodramatic approach to the Russian Revolution to be unrealistic and stylistically dated. Box-office reports in the 27 Jul 1918 Motion Picture News indicated that the film was attracting average business.
       The 29 Jun 1918 Exhibitors Herald listed several sequences removed by the Chicago, IL, Board of Censors. Among them were scenes involving drunkenness, one in which “Princess Natalya” shot her husband, and another in which her breasts were briefly exposed. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
13 Apr 1918
p. 28
Exhibitors Herald
4 May 1918
p. 36
Exhibitors Herald
7 Jun 1918
p. 25
Exhibitors Herald
29 Jun 1918
p. 47
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Jun 1918
p. 2084
Motion Picture News
13 Apr 1918
p. 2230
Motion Picture News
1 Jun 1918
p. 3307
Motion Picture News
27 Jul 1918
p. 575
Motography
4 May 1918
p. 870
Motography
1 Jun 1918
p. 1071
Moving Picture World
11 May 1918
p. 912
Moving Picture World
18 May 1918
p. 1007, 1040
Moving Picture World
1 Jun 1918
p. 1332
NYDM
1 Jun 1918
p. 776
Photoplay
Aug 1918
p. 102
Wid's Daily
9 Jun 1918
pp. 11-12
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Fires of Hate
Release Date:
19 May 1918
Production Date:
early April--early May 1918
Copyright Claimant:
William Fox
Copyright Date:
26 May 1918
Copyright Number:
LP12487
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the time of the Russian Revolution, Princess Natalya falls in love with Julian Ross, an American of Russian descent who has been imprisoned for writing revolutionary tracts. She arranges his release, telling him that she is a governess in the home of Prince Andrei Rostoff, who is actually her uncle. Natalya's brother is killed in battle because of the treachery of Rostoff and his son Boris, allies of the German Kaiser, who provided the Russian army with faulty ammunition. For this, Julian assassinates the Rostoffs, and Natalya shoots the American in revenge. Julian, only slightly wounded, produces a document proving the Rostoffs' connections with the Kaiser, whereupon Natalya forgives him and agrees to be his ... +


At the time of the Russian Revolution, Princess Natalya falls in love with Julian Ross, an American of Russian descent who has been imprisoned for writing revolutionary tracts. She arranges his release, telling him that she is a governess in the home of Prince Andrei Rostoff, who is actually her uncle. Natalya's brother is killed in battle because of the treachery of Rostoff and his son Boris, allies of the German Kaiser, who provided the Russian army with faulty ammunition. For this, Julian assassinates the Rostoffs, and Natalya shoots the American in revenge. Julian, only slightly wounded, produces a document proving the Rostoffs' connections with the Kaiser, whereupon Natalya forgives him and agrees to be his wife. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.