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HISTORY

The 7 Sep 1918 Motion Picture News reported that principal photography started the previous week at Famous Players-Lasky Studios in New York City. Provisionally titled Gosh Darn the Kaiser, the film was the second teaming of actors Shirley Mason and Ernest Truex by John Emerson and Anita Loos, who were referred to as producers. The scenario was described as “a travesty” on German monarch Kaiser Wilhelm II and his distinctive mustache. Truex, who had grown a mustache in the hope of graduating from juvenile roles, told the Feb 1919 Picture Play that he was required to shave if off for the film.
       The 12 Oct 1918 Motion Picture News stated that production was nearing completion. Editing was underway the following week, as noted in the 19 Oct 1918 issue.
       Six weeks later, the 30 Nov 1918 Motion Picture New announced the official title as Good-Bye, Bill, possibly inspired by the Kaiser’s self-imposed exile to the Netherlands following his own country’s defeat. The film opened 15 Dec 1918 to lukewarm reviews, such as in the 14 Dec 1918 Moving Picture World, which found the slapstick comedy at odds with the serious romantic subplot.
       A short story based on the scenario, titled Gosh Darn the Kaiser, appeared in the Feb 1919 Picture-Play. The 18 Jan 1919 Moving Picture World included a music and sound effects cue sheet for the film.
       According to the 3 May 1918 Var, an unrelated stage revue, also titled Good-Bye, Bill, opened ... More Less

The 7 Sep 1918 Motion Picture News reported that principal photography started the previous week at Famous Players-Lasky Studios in New York City. Provisionally titled Gosh Darn the Kaiser, the film was the second teaming of actors Shirley Mason and Ernest Truex by John Emerson and Anita Loos, who were referred to as producers. The scenario was described as “a travesty” on German monarch Kaiser Wilhelm II and his distinctive mustache. Truex, who had grown a mustache in the hope of graduating from juvenile roles, told the Feb 1919 Picture Play that he was required to shave if off for the film.
       The 12 Oct 1918 Motion Picture News stated that production was nearing completion. Editing was underway the following week, as noted in the 19 Oct 1918 issue.
       Six weeks later, the 30 Nov 1918 Motion Picture New announced the official title as Good-Bye, Bill, possibly inspired by the Kaiser’s self-imposed exile to the Netherlands following his own country’s defeat. The film opened 15 Dec 1918 to lukewarm reviews, such as in the 14 Dec 1918 Moving Picture World, which found the slapstick comedy at odds with the serious romantic subplot.
       A short story based on the scenario, titled Gosh Darn the Kaiser, appeared in the Feb 1919 Picture-Play. The 18 Jan 1919 Moving Picture World included a music and sound effects cue sheet for the film.
       According to the 3 May 1918 Var, an unrelated stage revue, also titled Good-Bye, Bill, opened at the 44th Street Theater in New York City. The cast was comprised of soldiers in the U.S. Ambulance Corps.
       An advertisement displayed the title as Goodbye Bill!
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
14 Dec 1918
p. 161
Exhibitors Trade Review
28 Dec 1918
p. 264
Motion Picture News
7 Sep 1918
p. 1540
Motion Picture News
12 Oct 1918
p. 2374
Motion Picture News
19 Oct 1918
p. 2545
Motion Picture News
30 Nov 1918
p. 3242
Motion Picture News
7 Dec 1918
p. 3379
Motion Picture News
18 Dec 1918
p. 3950
Motion Picture News
21 Dec 1918
p. 3769
Motion Picture News
4 Jan 1919
p. 3
Moving Picture World
14 Dec 1918
p. 1249
Moving Picture World
28 Dec 1918
p. 1558
Moving Picture World
18 Jan 1919
p. 356
Picture Play
Feb 1919
pp. 194-202, 231
Variety
3 May 1918
p. 16
Variety
31 Jan 19
p. 52.
Wid's Daily
8 Dec 1918
pp. 11-12
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Gosh Darn the Kaiser
Release Date:
15 December 1918
Production Date:
late-August--early October 1918
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
Copyright Date:
7 December 1918
Copyright Number:
LP13143
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
4,854
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During World War I, Herr Dresser, a German-American professor from West Hoboken, New Jersey, invents a "moustache fixer," which stiffens the whiskers, making the wearer look very fierce. Much to the consternation of Dresser's daughter Elsie, a patriotic American, Kaiser Wilhelm calls them to Berlin to begin mass production of the tonic for the German army. Elsie's boyfriend, Teddy Swift, is particularly disturbed by this turn of events and decides to earn enough money to follow her to Germany. When the United States joins the war, Teddy is among the first to enlist, and soon he finds himself in Berlin trying to help Elsie escape from prison. After several narrow escapes, the two make their way to the moustache factory and blow it up. Brought before the Kaiser, they are rescued when American troops storm the palace, and the Kaiser loses his moustache and the ... +


During World War I, Herr Dresser, a German-American professor from West Hoboken, New Jersey, invents a "moustache fixer," which stiffens the whiskers, making the wearer look very fierce. Much to the consternation of Dresser's daughter Elsie, a patriotic American, Kaiser Wilhelm calls them to Berlin to begin mass production of the tonic for the German army. Elsie's boyfriend, Teddy Swift, is particularly disturbed by this turn of events and decides to earn enough money to follow her to Germany. When the United States joins the war, Teddy is among the first to enlist, and soon he finds himself in Berlin trying to help Elsie escape from prison. After several narrow escapes, the two make their way to the moustache factory and blow it up. Brought before the Kaiser, they are rescued when American troops storm the palace, and the Kaiser loses his moustache and the war. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.