The Great Sioux Massacre (1965)

91 mins | Drama | 16 September 1965

Director:

Sidney Salkow

Producer:

Leon Fromkess

Cinematographer:

Irving Lippman

Editor:

William Austin

Production Designer:

F. Paul Sylos

Production Company:

F & F Productions
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HISTORY

The 28 Oct 1964 DV announced the provisionally-titled Custer's Massacre as an upcoming project for Leon Fromkess and Sam Firks's F & F Productions, to be filmed at Samuel Goldwyn Studios in West Hollywood, CA, and on location in Arizona. Three weeks later, the 18 Nov 1964 Var reported the impending arrival of star Joseph Cotten at Old Tucson Studios on the outskirts of Tucson, AZ. At the time, he was also co-starring in the MGM production, The Money Trap (1966, see entry). The 15 Dec 1964 DV noted that filming concluded two weeks earlier and editing was nearing completion. The title had since been changed to Massacre at the Rosebud. An article in the 20 Jan 1965 Var revealed that the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rejected the original title because of its similarity to The Day Custer Fell, a property registered by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. The F & F production had since been officially renamed The Great Sioux Massacre.
       On 11 Aug 1965, Var announced the 16 Sep 1965 premiere in Minot, ND, near the site of the battle portrayed in the film. The event, sponsored by the Minot Chamber of Commerce and the Minot Business Men's Association, included a "civic celebration" to be attended by film critics from around the U.S. A review in the 21 Sep 1965 DV described the picture as "a firstrate programmer." Openings continued over the next several months, including an 18 May 1966 debut at twenty-nine Los Angeles ... More Less

The 28 Oct 1964 DV announced the provisionally-titled Custer's Massacre as an upcoming project for Leon Fromkess and Sam Firks's F & F Productions, to be filmed at Samuel Goldwyn Studios in West Hollywood, CA, and on location in Arizona. Three weeks later, the 18 Nov 1964 Var reported the impending arrival of star Joseph Cotten at Old Tucson Studios on the outskirts of Tucson, AZ. At the time, he was also co-starring in the MGM production, The Money Trap (1966, see entry). The 15 Dec 1964 DV noted that filming concluded two weeks earlier and editing was nearing completion. The title had since been changed to Massacre at the Rosebud. An article in the 20 Jan 1965 Var revealed that the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) rejected the original title because of its similarity to The Day Custer Fell, a property registered by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. The F & F production had since been officially renamed The Great Sioux Massacre.
       On 11 Aug 1965, Var announced the 16 Sep 1965 premiere in Minot, ND, near the site of the battle portrayed in the film. The event, sponsored by the Minot Chamber of Commerce and the Minot Business Men's Association, included a "civic celebration" to be attended by film critics from around the U.S. A review in the 21 Sep 1965 DV described the picture as "a firstrate programmer." Openings continued over the next several months, including an 18 May 1966 debut at twenty-nine Los Angeles theaters, on a double bill with The Silencers (1966, see entry). The picture closed one year later in Cincinnati, OH, as indicated by a 31 May 1967 Var box office report.
       A news item in the 5 Oct 1966 Var noted that The Great Sioux Massacre was one of sixteen features sold by Columbia Pictures to the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) at $550,000 per title.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Oct 1964
p. 3.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1964
p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
2 Feb 1965
Section C, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
18 May 1966
Section D, p. 12.
Variety
18 Nov 1964
p. 69.
Variety
20 Jan 1965
p. 5.
Variety
11 Aug 1965
p. 7.
Variety
21 Sep 1965
p. 3.
Variety
29 Sep 1965
p. 9.
Variety
25 May 1966
p. 10.
Variety
5 Oct 1966
p. 25.
Variety
31 May 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mix
Sd eff ed
Music ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Tech adv
Prop master
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Massacre at the Rosebud
The Custer Massacre
Custer's Massacre
Release Date:
16 September 1965
Premiere Information:
Minot, ND, premiere: 16 September 1965
Los Angeles opening: 18 May 1966
Production Date:
November 1964
Copyright Claimant:
F & F Productions
Copyright Date:
1 June 1965
Copyright Number:
LP31607
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
91
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A United States Army disciplinary court charges Major Reno with responsibility for the slaughter at Custer's Last Stand. Captain Benton takes the stand to refute the charges against Reno and take the blame for the Sioux massacre of cavalry troops headed by Col. George Armstrong Custer. He relates the situations that led Custer and his men to slaughter on the banks of the Little Big Horn River. Captain Benton joins Custer's staff because they both believe that the Indians should receive fair treatment from the United States Government. Soon Benton meets Major Reno's daughter Caroline, and they fall in love. Colonel Custer accuses powerful government officials in Washington, D.C., of cheating the Indians through deals with corrupt Indian agents, and, as a result, he loses his command and lives in forced retirement. Sen. James Blaine approaches Custer and offers his reinstatement and a chance to become President of the United States if he will agree to oppress the Indians. Thinking he will become a public hero, Custer, accompanied by a reporter, compromises his principles and murders Indians at every chance. Encouraged by his ambitious wife, Libbie, Custer follows orders to lead his men into a great battle against the Sioux. When he and his forces reach the Little Big Horn River, the Indian units, led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, prove stronger. The Sioux kill Custer and massacre his soldiers. After Benton finishes the story, the military board decides that nothing amiss has occurred and ends the ... +


A United States Army disciplinary court charges Major Reno with responsibility for the slaughter at Custer's Last Stand. Captain Benton takes the stand to refute the charges against Reno and take the blame for the Sioux massacre of cavalry troops headed by Col. George Armstrong Custer. He relates the situations that led Custer and his men to slaughter on the banks of the Little Big Horn River. Captain Benton joins Custer's staff because they both believe that the Indians should receive fair treatment from the United States Government. Soon Benton meets Major Reno's daughter Caroline, and they fall in love. Colonel Custer accuses powerful government officials in Washington, D.C., of cheating the Indians through deals with corrupt Indian agents, and, as a result, he loses his command and lives in forced retirement. Sen. James Blaine approaches Custer and offers his reinstatement and a chance to become President of the United States if he will agree to oppress the Indians. Thinking he will become a public hero, Custer, accompanied by a reporter, compromises his principles and murders Indians at every chance. Encouraged by his ambitious wife, Libbie, Custer follows orders to lead his men into a great battle against the Sioux. When he and his forces reach the Little Big Horn River, the Indian units, led by Chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, prove stronger. The Sioux kill Custer and massacre his soldiers. After Benton finishes the story, the military board decides that nothing amiss has occurred and ends the inquiry. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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