Strange Bedfellows (1965)

99 mins | Romantic comedy | 10 February 1965

Full page view
HISTORY

Following the collaboration of writing partners Norman Panama and Melvin Frank on United Artists The Road to Hong Kong (1962, see entry), an 8 Aug 1962 DV item announced that the duo had agreed to develop a new story, Strange Bedfellows, as part of a recent four-picture deal with the studio. By the following year, however, the project had moved to Universal Pictures. Although a 6 Mar 1963 DV brief revealed that Panama and Frank first approached Cary Grant to play the leading role, the 20 Nov 1963 Var reported that Universal sanctioned the re-teaming of Rock Hudson and Gina Lollabrigida, who previously co-starred in Come September (1961, see entry). Hudson was also alleged to be involved through his company, Gibraltar Productions, in association with Melnor Films, which produced The Road to Hong Kong. Neither company’s participation could be confirmed in other contemporary sources, and the 15 Dec 1964 DV review credited the picture as a “Panama and Frank Production.” According to a 24 Feb 1964 LAT news item, however, Panama returned to his home in London, England, after the early preparatory stages, allowing Frank to continue as the solo producer-director.
       A 31 Dec 1963 DV report suggested that Frank approached Robert Redford about a role in the wake of his success in the legitimate stage version of Barefoot in the Park. Multiple sources referred to cameo appearances by actors such as Maurice Dallimore, who stepped in for Peter Sellers while he recuperated from a heart attack; Stanton Moore, who portrayed a wedding officiate; and Waldo Lord, ... More Less

Following the collaboration of writing partners Norman Panama and Melvin Frank on United Artists The Road to Hong Kong (1962, see entry), an 8 Aug 1962 DV item announced that the duo had agreed to develop a new story, Strange Bedfellows, as part of a recent four-picture deal with the studio. By the following year, however, the project had moved to Universal Pictures. Although a 6 Mar 1963 DV brief revealed that Panama and Frank first approached Cary Grant to play the leading role, the 20 Nov 1963 Var reported that Universal sanctioned the re-teaming of Rock Hudson and Gina Lollabrigida, who previously co-starred in Come September (1961, see entry). Hudson was also alleged to be involved through his company, Gibraltar Productions, in association with Melnor Films, which produced The Road to Hong Kong. Neither company’s participation could be confirmed in other contemporary sources, and the 15 Dec 1964 DV review credited the picture as a “Panama and Frank Production.” According to a 24 Feb 1964 LAT news item, however, Panama returned to his home in London, England, after the early preparatory stages, allowing Frank to continue as the solo producer-director.
       A 31 Dec 1963 DV report suggested that Frank approached Robert Redford about a role in the wake of his success in the legitimate stage version of Barefoot in the Park. Multiple sources referred to cameo appearances by actors such as Maurice Dallimore, who stepped in for Peter Sellers while he recuperated from a heart attack; Stanton Moore, who portrayed a wedding officiate; and Waldo Lord, who was cast as a drunkard in a bar scene. Additional DV casting items also noted the participation of Keith McConnell, Paul Collins, Jack Raine, Jack Good, Danica D’Houdt, Arthur Gould-Porter, Alan Calliou, Frederick Worlock, and London taxicab driver Harold Richardson, while the 3 Jun 1964 Var claimed that Nora Marlowe (wife of actor James McCallion) had been cast alongside her husband as Gina Lollabrigida’s onscreen maid.
       Principal photography began 1 Apr 1964, as indicated by a 17 Apr 1964 DV production chart. According to the 28 May 1964 DV, Strange Bedfellows was the first motion picture to shoot on the Universal backlot’s “European street” after a $250,000 renovation, and the façade was decorated to resemble London’s Soho district. Despite his and Panama’s recent relocation to London, Frank told the 19 Dec 1963 DV that the production was shot in California to save money, avoid poor weather, and accommodate Hudson’s request to work stateside. This item, as well as an 18 Feb 1964 DV article, suggested that the production may have also utilized facilities at the Warner Bros. Pictures studios in Burbank, CA. The 17 Jun 1964 DV reported that Frank had returned to London to complete background sequences. The total cost was estimated at $3 million.
       According to Var, the picture premiered 10 Feb 1965 at Florida States theaters in the Miami, FL, area, preceded by an extensive promotional event with Gina Lollabrigida. The Chicago, IL, opening took place two days later at the Chicago Theatre, with Los Angeles, CA, engagements beginning 26 Feb 1965 at the Hollywood Paramount Theatre. The Palace Theatre and other New York City venues debuted the film on 10 Mar 1965. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1962
p. 1.
Daily Variety
6 Mar 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1964
p. 10.
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
17 Apr 1964
p. 8.
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1964
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 May 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 May 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
19 May 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 May 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1964
p. 13.
Daily Variety
9 Jun 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 Jun 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
17 Jun 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Dec 1964
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
24 Feb 1964
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1965
Section C, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1965
p. 12.
New York Times
11 Mar 1965
p. 38.
Variety
20 Nov 1963
p. 16.
Variety
20 May 1964
p. 13.
Variety
3 Jun 1964
p. 13.
Variety
10 Feb 1965
p. 17.
Variety
10 Feb 1965
p. 70.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Norman Panama-Melvin Frank Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
In charge of prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
Gina lollobrigida's gowns des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Dial coach
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 February 1965
Premiere Information:
Miami premiere: 10 February 1965
Chicago opening: 12 February 1965
Los Angeles opening: 26 February 1965
New York opening: 10 March 1965
Production Date:
1 April--June 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Fernwood Productions
Copyright Date:
13 March 1965
Copyright Number:
LP33023
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
99
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Richard Bramwell, an American public relations ace for a U. S. oil company, comes to London to clean up the "corporate image" of Carter Harrison, a young executive destined to become president of the firm's international branch. Carter has been separated for 7 years from his Italian wife, Toni, whom he married after a whirlwind courtship. Toni now spends her time championing an assortment of bizarre minority causes. At first interested in divorce, Carter and Toni rekindle the old flame; but he is angered when he discovers that she is still attached to "nutty" causes and that she plans to picket the U. S. Embassy. Toni's current boyfriend, Harry Jones, advises her to leave for Reno immediately. Another breakup is followed by another reconciliation, with Carter promising to allow Toni anything in the way of causes. He and Bramwell then propose a plan to make her think Carter is about to accept a dangerous assignment--in reality, a scheme to prevent her from leading a protest march dressed as Lady Godiva astride a horse. At first Toni agrees to go to Nassau with Carter, but when she discovers the ruse she rushes off to Soho to take her place as Godiva. Chasing after her, Carter purposely causes a traffic disturbance, and the ensuing brawl lands everybody in court. When Bramwell is unable to shield Carter from the shocked attention of J. L. Stevens, his boss, an oil company lawyer makes a clever plea in Carter's defense. But Carter repudiates the defense, declaring he did everything for the love of Toni, who promptly melts into his arms. Stevens, aware of the "corporate image," fires Carter and Bramwell--but, mindful of the tender ... +


Richard Bramwell, an American public relations ace for a U. S. oil company, comes to London to clean up the "corporate image" of Carter Harrison, a young executive destined to become president of the firm's international branch. Carter has been separated for 7 years from his Italian wife, Toni, whom he married after a whirlwind courtship. Toni now spends her time championing an assortment of bizarre minority causes. At first interested in divorce, Carter and Toni rekindle the old flame; but he is angered when he discovers that she is still attached to "nutty" causes and that she plans to picket the U. S. Embassy. Toni's current boyfriend, Harry Jones, advises her to leave for Reno immediately. Another breakup is followed by another reconciliation, with Carter promising to allow Toni anything in the way of causes. He and Bramwell then propose a plan to make her think Carter is about to accept a dangerous assignment--in reality, a scheme to prevent her from leading a protest march dressed as Lady Godiva astride a horse. At first Toni agrees to go to Nassau with Carter, but when she discovers the ruse she rushes off to Soho to take her place as Godiva. Chasing after her, Carter purposely causes a traffic disturbance, and the ensuing brawl lands everybody in court. When Bramwell is unable to shield Carter from the shocked attention of J. L. Stevens, his boss, an oil company lawyer makes a clever plea in Carter's defense. But Carter repudiates the defense, declaring he did everything for the love of Toni, who promptly melts into his arms. Stevens, aware of the "corporate image," fires Carter and Bramwell--but, mindful of the tender feelings of Mrs. Stevens, also promises to rehire them. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.