The President's Analyst (1967)

104 mins | Satire | 21 December 1967

Producer:

Stanley Rubin

Cinematographer:

William Fraker

Production Designer:

Pato Guzman

Production Company:

Panpiper Productions
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HISTORY

According to articles in the 11 Jun 1967 and 22 Jun 1967 LAT, actor James Coburn first met writer-director Theodore J. Flicker while shooting Charade (1963, see entry) in Paris, France, and they became reacquainted at a Christmas party at the home of George Peppard in 1966. The two agreed to work together before Coburn was due to start his next picture, so Flicker presented treatments of The President’s Analyst and another project titled The Man from MEDICI. They selected the former, which was more developed, and presented the idea to recently-installed Paramount Pictures production chief Robert J. Evans. A deal was secured in twenty-four hours, and the 15 Feb 1967 Var claimed that commitments from producer Stanley Rubin and executive producer Howard W. Koch were finalized within the next week. The 11 Jun 1967 LAT referred to a budget of “over $2 million.”
       On 28 Jan 1967, LAT reported that Coburn would independently produce the film, now referred to by the abbreviated title, T.P.A., through his new company, Panpiper Productions. Within a few weeks, a 17 Feb 967 LAT news item stated that Paramount talent supervisor Joyce Selznick had begun searching for actors in New York City. Exactly two months later, LAT announced the casting of folk singer Barry McGuire in his first motion picture role, while several LAT and DV casting items throughout the summer named the following actors whose participation could not be confirmed or may have been uncredited: Angelique Pettyjohn, Fred Lerner, Walt Davis, Roger Creed, David Jones, Vietnamese ... More Less

According to articles in the 11 Jun 1967 and 22 Jun 1967 LAT, actor James Coburn first met writer-director Theodore J. Flicker while shooting Charade (1963, see entry) in Paris, France, and they became reacquainted at a Christmas party at the home of George Peppard in 1966. The two agreed to work together before Coburn was due to start his next picture, so Flicker presented treatments of The President’s Analyst and another project titled The Man from MEDICI. They selected the former, which was more developed, and presented the idea to recently-installed Paramount Pictures production chief Robert J. Evans. A deal was secured in twenty-four hours, and the 15 Feb 1967 Var claimed that commitments from producer Stanley Rubin and executive producer Howard W. Koch were finalized within the next week. The 11 Jun 1967 LAT referred to a budget of “over $2 million.”
       On 28 Jan 1967, LAT reported that Coburn would independently produce the film, now referred to by the abbreviated title, T.P.A., through his new company, Panpiper Productions. Within a few weeks, a 17 Feb 967 LAT news item stated that Paramount talent supervisor Joyce Selznick had begun searching for actors in New York City. Exactly two months later, LAT announced the casting of folk singer Barry McGuire in his first motion picture role, while several LAT and DV casting items throughout the summer named the following actors whose participation could not be confirmed or may have been uncredited: Angelique Pettyjohn, Fred Lerner, Walt Davis, Roger Creed, David Jones, Vietnamese ambassador Soon Taik On, Japanese ambassador Rollin Moriyama, Nigerian ambassador Khalil Nimini Ben Bezaleel, Bill Svanoe of The Rooftop Singers, Kirsten York, Pat Carpenter, Joie Magidow, William Ryusaki, Kenny Endoso, William Siro, and Larry Duran. The 21 Sep 1967 Los Angeles Sentinel also identified Candy Ward in a series of publicity images with co-star Godfrey Cambridge. According to a 13 Jun 1967 DV brief, producer Stanley Rubin cast his wife, Kathleen Hughes, and two children, John and Chris Rubin, as White House tourists.
       The 21 Jun 1967 Var revealed that Jill Banner replaced Romina Power in the role of “Snow White” at the last minute, although no explanation was given for the change.
       According to a 3 May 1967 Var production chart, principal photography began 18 Apr 1967. While most scenes were filmed at the Paramount studios in Hollywood, CA, a 20 Sep 1967 Var item indicated that the unit also spent eight days on location in New York City. Shortly after the start of production, a 10 May 1967 Var article revealed that Coburn had made public statements criticizing the “unhealthy labor demands” of New York City unions that prevented them from shooting the entire picture there. Koch vehemently denied these claims, and stated that no one involved in the production ever entered negotiations to film in New York City beyond a few exterior location days. Coburn later did encounter problems with city officials when filming a police chase sequence near MacDougal Street and Minetta Lane in Greenwich Village: as Coburn rounded a corner pursued by two actors dressed as policeman, tactical patrolman Melvin Schwartz mistook the scene for a real chase and beat Coburn with his nightstick. According to the 23 Jun 1967 NYT, the incident left the actor with several cuts on his face and head, prompting a note of apology from Mayor John Lindsay.
       Coburn also reportedly accused Paramount of raising the prices of the sets constructed at the West Coast studio. According to a 12 Aug 1967 NYT article on Paramount producer A. C. Lyles, sets from The President’s Analyst were recycled for Lyles’s 1968 picture, Rogue’s Gallery.
       Items in the 20 Dec 1967 Var and 21 Dec 1967 DV referred to a New York City premiere and a screening at Washington, D.C.’s Teamsters’ union hall, although no exact dates were given. The picture opened 21 Dec 1967 at the Forum and Loew’s Tower East theaters in New York City, and the following day at the Warner Beverly Hills Theatre in California. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
9 Jun 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
13 Jun 1967
p. 6.
Daily Variety
21 Dec 1967
p. 2.
Los Angeles Sentinel
21 Sep 1967
Section D, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
28 Jan 1967
p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1967
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
17 Apr 1967
Section D, p. 31.
Los Angeles Times
24 Apr 1967
Section D, p. 23.
Los Angeles Times
6 May 1967
Section B, p. 6.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jun 1967
Section D, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jun 1967
Section L, p. 55.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1967
Section D, p. 1, 10.
Los Angeles Times
14 Dec 1967
Section D, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1967
Section C, p. 19.
New York Times
22 Jun 1967
p. 47.
New York Times
23 Jun 1967
p. 54.
New York Times
12 Aug 1967
p. 15.
New York Times
22 Dec 1967
p. 44.
Variety
15 Feb 1967
p. 4.
Variety
3 May 1967
p. 28.
Variety
10 May 1967
p. 3.
Variety
21 Jun 1967
p. 15.
Variety
20 Sep 1967
p. 13.
Variety
20 Dec 1967
p. 14.
Variety
20 Dec 1967
p. 42.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Hairstyle supv
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
ANIMATION
SOURCES
SONGS
"Inner Manipulations," words and music by Barry McGuire and Paul Potash
sung by Barry McGuire
"She's Ready To Be Free," words and music by The Clear Light, sung by The Clear Light
+
SONGS
"Inner Manipulations," words and music by Barry McGuire and Paul Potash
sung by Barry McGuire
"She's Ready To Be Free," words and music by The Clear Light, sung by The Clear Light
"Hey Me," words and music by Lalo Schifrin and Theodore J. Flicker.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
T.P.A.
TPA
Release Date:
21 December 1967
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 December 1967
Los Angeles opening: 22 December 1967
Production Date:
began 18 April 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Panpiper Productions
Copyright Date:
20 December 1967
Copyright Number:
LP35321
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
104
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Unknown to successful New York psychiatrist Dr. Sidney Schaefer, one of his patients, CEA (Central Enquiries Agency) agent Don Masters, has been evaluating him for the important task of becoming the President's analyst. After being sworn to secrecy, Schaefer and his newfound girl friend, Nan, move to Washington. Here he meets CEA head Ethan Allen Cocket and FBR (Federal Board of Regulations) chief Henry Lux, who are suspicious of each other. Though a great help to the President, Schaefer, unable to speak with anyone, soon acquires the President's tensions, constantly feels that he is being followed, and even becomes wary of Nan. Seeking relief, Schaefer mingles with a White House tour group and leaves Washington for New Jersey with the Quantrills, a typical gun-carrying, karate-practicing, eavesdropping American family, who boast of being liberals and are cautious of their rightwing neighbors. Schaefer, now being pursued by secret agents of other nationalities as well, escapes with a group of nomadic hippies. Kidnaped by Canadian Secret Service agents disguised as a Liverpool rock group, they are additionally abducted by Russian spy Kropotkin. Schaefer convinces Kropotkin that he needs an analyst, and they set out together for Washington. En route, Schaefer is kidnaped by the Telephone Company, which, angered over constant complaints about its inefficiency, plans to take over the country and use Schaefer to brainwash the President. Masters and Kropotkin, old friends from previous clandestine assignments, join forces, rescue Schaefer, and destroy the Telephone Company's headquarters. Returning to Washington, Schaefer resumes his job and marries Nan, who has been cleared on a security level equal to his own. The couple, accompanied by Masters and Kropotkin, enjoy Christmas evening together, unaware they are ... +


Unknown to successful New York psychiatrist Dr. Sidney Schaefer, one of his patients, CEA (Central Enquiries Agency) agent Don Masters, has been evaluating him for the important task of becoming the President's analyst. After being sworn to secrecy, Schaefer and his newfound girl friend, Nan, move to Washington. Here he meets CEA head Ethan Allen Cocket and FBR (Federal Board of Regulations) chief Henry Lux, who are suspicious of each other. Though a great help to the President, Schaefer, unable to speak with anyone, soon acquires the President's tensions, constantly feels that he is being followed, and even becomes wary of Nan. Seeking relief, Schaefer mingles with a White House tour group and leaves Washington for New Jersey with the Quantrills, a typical gun-carrying, karate-practicing, eavesdropping American family, who boast of being liberals and are cautious of their rightwing neighbors. Schaefer, now being pursued by secret agents of other nationalities as well, escapes with a group of nomadic hippies. Kidnaped by Canadian Secret Service agents disguised as a Liverpool rock group, they are additionally abducted by Russian spy Kropotkin. Schaefer convinces Kropotkin that he needs an analyst, and they set out together for Washington. En route, Schaefer is kidnaped by the Telephone Company, which, angered over constant complaints about its inefficiency, plans to take over the country and use Schaefer to brainwash the President. Masters and Kropotkin, old friends from previous clandestine assignments, join forces, rescue Schaefer, and destroy the Telephone Company's headquarters. Returning to Washington, Schaefer resumes his job and marries Nan, who has been cleared on a security level equal to his own. The couple, accompanied by Masters and Kropotkin, enjoy Christmas evening together, unaware they are being watched by Telephone Company automatons. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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