Finger on the Trigger (1965)

87 mins | Western | October 1965

Director:

Sidney Pink

Producer:

Sidney Pink

Cinematographers:

A. Macasoli, Miguel Barquero

Editor:

M. Ochoa

Production Designer:

Patrick Corcoran

Production Companies:

Comet Pictures (Hollywood), F. I. S. A.
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HISTORY

The 11 May 1964 DV announced the upcoming production, featuring Rory Calhoun. Meri Welles and Lita Baron were also listed as prospective cast members. Weeks later, the 22 Jun 1964 DV reported that Woolner Bros. Pictures was arranging a joint production deal with an unidentified Spanish company. Filming was expected to begin in Madrid, Spain, the following month. Sidney Pink and Hugo Grimaldi were listed as co-producers. On 20 Jul 1964, DV reported that Pink was contracted to the newly-formed Films lnternacionales Sociedad Anonyma (F. I. S. A). In his 2012 book, Actors of the Spaghetti Westerns, author James Prickette revealed that the company was a partnership between Spanish attorney Antonio Recoder, executive producer and Pink associate José López Moreno, and Mole-Richardson, a Los Angeles, CA, manufacturer of stage and motion picture lighting equipment.
       Meanwhile, veteran actor Victor Mature replaced Calhoun in the lead role, as stated in the 2 Jul 1964 DV. It was to be Mature’s first picture following a four-year hiatus. However, on 4 Aug 1964, DV announced that the actor had left the production over a contractual dispute. Two weeks later, the 18 Aug 1964 issue reported that Calhoun reclaimed the starring role, and was currently filming in the mountains outside Madrid. The company had recently completed a three-week shoot in the southeastern province of Almeria.
       An article in the 8 Dec 1964 DV stated that Pink had filed a $1.174 million lawsuit against Mature, claiming the actor had no intention of fulfilling the terms of his contract. ... More Less

The 11 May 1964 DV announced the upcoming production, featuring Rory Calhoun. Meri Welles and Lita Baron were also listed as prospective cast members. Weeks later, the 22 Jun 1964 DV reported that Woolner Bros. Pictures was arranging a joint production deal with an unidentified Spanish company. Filming was expected to begin in Madrid, Spain, the following month. Sidney Pink and Hugo Grimaldi were listed as co-producers. On 20 Jul 1964, DV reported that Pink was contracted to the newly-formed Films lnternacionales Sociedad Anonyma (F. I. S. A). In his 2012 book, Actors of the Spaghetti Westerns, author James Prickette revealed that the company was a partnership between Spanish attorney Antonio Recoder, executive producer and Pink associate José López Moreno, and Mole-Richardson, a Los Angeles, CA, manufacturer of stage and motion picture lighting equipment.
       Meanwhile, veteran actor Victor Mature replaced Calhoun in the lead role, as stated in the 2 Jul 1964 DV. It was to be Mature’s first picture following a four-year hiatus. However, on 4 Aug 1964, DV announced that the actor had left the production over a contractual dispute. Two weeks later, the 18 Aug 1964 issue reported that Calhoun reclaimed the starring role, and was currently filming in the mountains outside Madrid. The company had recently completed a three-week shoot in the southeastern province of Almeria.
       An article in the 8 Dec 1964 DV stated that Pink had filed a $1.174 million lawsuit against Mature, claiming the actor had no intention of fulfilling the terms of his contract. According to the article, Mature was issued two first-class airline tickets and $1,500 for expenses. He arrived in Madrid on 12 Jul 1964, five days later than expected, accompanied by Fred Carson, who was to be paid $100 per day as the actor’s stand-in. After Pink agreed to this demand, Mature reportedly made several others, then left for England ten days after his arrival.
       An advertisement in the 20 Oct 1965 Var noted that the film was currently in release. Movie listings in the 21 Nov 1965 and 17 Dec 1965 editions of LAT indicated openings in the California cities of Bakersfield and Palm Springs, respectively. The picture debuted during early Feb 1966 in New York City on a double bill with The Slender Thread (1965, see entry). Los Angeles openings followed in Nov 1966, according to the 16 Nov 1966 LAT.
       Opened in Madrid in Mar 1965 as El dedo en el gatillo ; running time: 94 minutes. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 May 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
2 Jul 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Jul 1964
p. 10.
Daily Variety
4 Aug 1964
p. 12.
Daily Variety
18 Aug 1964
p. 3.
Daily Variety
8 Dec 1964
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
21 Nov 1965
Section B, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
17 Dec 1965
Section E, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
16 Nov 1966
Section E. p. 16.
New York Times
7 Feb 1966
p. 33.
Variety
20 Oct 1965
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sidney Pink Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
El dedo en el gatillo
Release Date:
October 1965
Premiere Information:
New York opening: early February 1966
Los Angeles opening: November 1966
Production Date:
began July 1964
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
87
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the end of the Civil War in 1865, a band of Union veterans led by Larry Winton sets out for New Mexico, where they intend to homestead. They arrive at Fort Grant, which they find under the control of diehard Confederate forces awaiting a shipment of golden horseshoes. In the ghost town of Southernville the Yankees discover the golden horseshoes. When Fort Grant and Southernville are attacked by Indians, the veterans come to the aid of their former antagonists, melting down the gold for shell casings and repulsing the attacking ... +


At the end of the Civil War in 1865, a band of Union veterans led by Larry Winton sets out for New Mexico, where they intend to homestead. They arrive at Fort Grant, which they find under the control of diehard Confederate forces awaiting a shipment of golden horseshoes. In the ghost town of Southernville the Yankees discover the golden horseshoes. When Fort Grant and Southernville are attacked by Indians, the veterans come to the aid of their former antagonists, melting down the gold for shell casings and repulsing the attacking Indians. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.