A Face in the Rain (1963)

81 mins | Melodrama | March 1963

Director:

Irvin Kershner

Writer:

Hugo Butler

Producer:

John Calley

Cinematographer:

Haskell Wexler

Editor:

Melvin Sloan

Production Designer:

Sergio Canevari

Production Companies:

Embassy Pictures Corp., Filmways, Inc., Calvic
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HISTORY

The 15 Nov 1961 Var reported that filming was expected to begin late that month in Rome, Italy. Although the 16 Nov 1961 DV claimed the working title had been Capri, the
28 Nov 1961 issue revealed that it was the title of another project, postponed in favor of A Face in the Rain. According to a news item in the 13 Dec 1961 Var, principal photography was currently underway at Pisorno Studios, outside of Rome. However, an advertisement in the 2 May 1962 issue stated that filming took place at Tirrenia Studios. On 27 Dec 1961, Var announced that Joseph E. Levine of Embassy Pictures Corp. registered the title with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Three months later, the picture was in postproduction, according to the 7 Mar 1962 Var. Another year passed before a release was announced in the 20 Mar 1963 edition.
       he 15 May 1963 DV reported the picture's opening in early May 1963 at the Warfield Theatre in San Francisco, CA, billed with the 1961 Italian-Yugoslavian coproduction, Constantine and the Cross. A review in the 18 Mar 1963 DV described the film as a below-average World War II drama, but suggested it would be profitable, based on its moderate production values. ... More Less

The 15 Nov 1961 Var reported that filming was expected to begin late that month in Rome, Italy. Although the 16 Nov 1961 DV claimed the working title had been Capri, the
28 Nov 1961 issue revealed that it was the title of another project, postponed in favor of A Face in the Rain. According to a news item in the 13 Dec 1961 Var, principal photography was currently underway at Pisorno Studios, outside of Rome. However, an advertisement in the 2 May 1962 issue stated that filming took place at Tirrenia Studios. On 27 Dec 1961, Var announced that Joseph E. Levine of Embassy Pictures Corp. registered the title with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Three months later, the picture was in postproduction, according to the 7 Mar 1962 Var. Another year passed before a release was announced in the 20 Mar 1963 edition.
       he 15 May 1963 DV reported the picture's opening in early May 1963 at the Warfield Theatre in San Francisco, CA, billed with the 1961 Italian-Yugoslavian coproduction, Constantine and the Cross. A review in the 18 Mar 1963 DV described the film as a below-average World War II drama, but suggested it would be profitable, based on its moderate production values.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
16 Nov 1961
p. 5.
Daily Variety
28 Nov 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
15 May 1963
p. 6.
Variety
15 Nov 1961
p. 11.
Variety
13 Dec 1961
p. 15.
Variety
27 Dec 1961
p. 4.
Variety
7 Mar 1962
p. 40.
Variety
2 May 1962
p. 43.
Variety
20 Mar 1963
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Writ for the screen
Based on a scr by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
SOUND
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1963
Premiere Information:
San Francisco opening: early May 1963
Production Date:
began late November 1961
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rand begins to write a letter to Anna, the Italian woman who saved his life during World War II. As he writes, Rand remembers the events of the past. An American spy working with the underground in Nazi-occupied Pisa, he seeks refuge at the home of a contact when the Nazis discover his operation. The contact is not home, however, and Anna, the man's wife, resents Rand's presence, but her son Paolo hides him in the attic. In exchange for her husband's protection, Anna has been having an affair with Klaus, the Nazi officer who is in charge of the search for Rand. Klaus arrives to make Anna's home his headquarters for the night, and Rand is unable to escape. Because he has not captured the American and is involved with the wife of a suspected spy, Klaus is relieved of authority. Although Anna has come to love Klaus, she is unable to betray Rand, and she sends Paolo to inform the underground of the American's plight. Rand manages to escape, but the Nazis pursue Anna; she is killed by Klaus, who wishes to redeem himself with the Gestapo. Rand, who returned safely to the United States, is unaware that he is writing to a dead ... +


Rand begins to write a letter to Anna, the Italian woman who saved his life during World War II. As he writes, Rand remembers the events of the past. An American spy working with the underground in Nazi-occupied Pisa, he seeks refuge at the home of a contact when the Nazis discover his operation. The contact is not home, however, and Anna, the man's wife, resents Rand's presence, but her son Paolo hides him in the attic. In exchange for her husband's protection, Anna has been having an affair with Klaus, the Nazi officer who is in charge of the search for Rand. Klaus arrives to make Anna's home his headquarters for the night, and Rand is unable to escape. Because he has not captured the American and is involved with the wife of a suspected spy, Klaus is relieved of authority. Although Anna has come to love Klaus, she is unable to betray Rand, and she sends Paolo to inform the underground of the American's plight. Rand manages to escape, but the Nazis pursue Anna; she is killed by Klaus, who wishes to redeem himself with the Gestapo. Rand, who returned safely to the United States, is unaware that he is writing to a dead woman. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.