Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969)

G | 106 mins | Western | 30 July 1969

Director:

Paul Wendkos

Writer:

Herman Hoffman

Cinematographer:

A. Macasoli

Production Designer:

José María Tapiador

Production Company:

Mirisch Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Guns of the Magnificent Seven was the second of three sequels to The Magnificent Seven (1960, see entry).
       The 20 Feb 1968 editions of LAT and DV announced the project as the first assigned to director Paul Wendkos under his multi-picture deal with Mirisch Productions, Inc., and its British counterpart, Mirisch Films, Ltd. The 26 Feb 1968 LAT noted that actor George Kennedy was given the lead role under a similar deal with Mirisch. Kennedy was experiencing a wave of popularity, following his recent Academy Award for Cool Hand Luke (1967, see entry).
       A news brief in the 4 Mar 1968 DV stated that producer Vincent M. Fennelly was scouting locations near Madrid, Spain. Principal photography began 23 Apr 1968, according to a 26 Apr 1968 DV production chart.
       An article in the 26 May 1968 LAT revealed that there were as many as forty U.S. productions filming in Spain during that period. Wendkos was reportedly exasperated by the language barrier before a bilingual crewmember offered to act as translator. Cast members stayed at the Castellana Hilton in Madrid. The 29 May 1968 Var reported that Kennedy and Wendkos were spending their free time filming a documentary about Madrid college students. Principal photography ended 26 Jun 1968, as noted in the next day’s DV.
       Later that year, the 11 Sep 1968 Var reported that distributor United Artists Corp. (UA) was rereleasing The Magnificent Seven and Return of the ... More Less

Guns of the Magnificent Seven was the second of three sequels to The Magnificent Seven (1960, see entry).
       The 20 Feb 1968 editions of LAT and DV announced the project as the first assigned to director Paul Wendkos under his multi-picture deal with Mirisch Productions, Inc., and its British counterpart, Mirisch Films, Ltd. The 26 Feb 1968 LAT noted that actor George Kennedy was given the lead role under a similar deal with Mirisch. Kennedy was experiencing a wave of popularity, following his recent Academy Award for Cool Hand Luke (1967, see entry).
       A news brief in the 4 Mar 1968 DV stated that producer Vincent M. Fennelly was scouting locations near Madrid, Spain. Principal photography began 23 Apr 1968, according to a 26 Apr 1968 DV production chart.
       An article in the 26 May 1968 LAT revealed that there were as many as forty U.S. productions filming in Spain during that period. Wendkos was reportedly exasperated by the language barrier before a bilingual crewmember offered to act as translator. Cast members stayed at the Castellana Hilton in Madrid. The 29 May 1968 Var reported that Kennedy and Wendkos were spending their free time filming a documentary about Madrid college students. Principal photography ended 26 Jun 1968, as noted in the next day’s DV.
       Later that year, the 11 Sep 1968 Var reported that distributor United Artists Corp. (UA) was rereleasing The Magnificent Seven and Return of the Seven (1966, see entry) as a double bill to promote the upcoming sequel. A news item in the 20 Aug 1969 Var revealed that both pictures employed “essentially the same Elmer Bernstein score,” although UA claimed that original scores were composed for both. The company admitted, however, that the score for Guns of the Magnificent Seven included elements from those of its two predecessors, with little new material. Regardless, Berstein was paid for his work on each of the individual films.
       The picture marked the screen debut of football player Bernie Casey of the Los Angeles Rams. While the 16 Aug 1968 DV reported that Casey had acquired representation through the William Morris Agency, the 17 Jul 1968 issue noted that Casey was postponing his acting career and was to resume training with the Rams that day.
       Guns of the Magnificent Seven opened 30 Jul 1969 in New York City, and on 13 Aug 1969 in Los Angeles, CA. Although a review in the 20 May 1969 DV stated that the production “rose above a routine storyline,” the 31 Jul 1969 NYT dismissed it as having “all the magnificence of a dead burro.” As noted in the 4 Jun 1969 Var, the film received a “G” rating from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). It was also declared “morally unobjectionable for adults and adolescents” by the Legion of Decency.
       Box-office reports in the 27 Jan 1971 Var indicated the opening of a triple bill, comprised of The Magnificent Seven and its two sequels. A third, The Magnificent Seven Ride! was released in 1972 (see entry).
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1968
p. 3.
Daily Variety
4 Mar 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Apr 1968
p. 18.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1968
p. 6.
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Aug 1968
p. 3.
Daily Variety
20 May 1969
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
20 Feb 1968
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
26 Feb 1968
Section C, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
26 May 1968
Section D, p. 1, 21.
Los Angeles Times
10 Aug 1969
Section P, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1969
Section D, p. 15.
New York Times
30 Jul 1969
p. 21.
New York Times
31 Jul 1969
p. 27.
Variety
29 May 1968
p. 18.
Variety
11 Sep 1968
p. 15.
Variety
4 Jun 1969
p. 28.
Variety
18 Jun 1969
p. 15.
Variety
20 Aug 1969
p. 22.
Variety
27 Jan 1971
p. 8.
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 July 1969
Premiere Information:
Philadelphia opening: 28 May 1969
New York opening: 30 July 1969
Los Angeles opening: 13 August 1969
Production Date:
23 April--26 June 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Mirisch Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 May 1969
Copyright Number:
LP37137
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
106
MPAA Rating:
G
Countries:
Spain, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 19th-century Mexico, Federales capture Quintero, the revolutionary who has attempted to rally the many disorganized groups opposing the dictatorship of President Díaz. Before going to prison, Quintero gives his lieutenant, Maximiliano O'Leary, $600 with which to continue the cause. Bandit chief Carlos Lobero demands that the money be used for guns and ammunition, but Max instead seeks the help of the legendary Chris, an American renowned for his bravery and cunning. Chris agrees to attempt a rescue of Quintero and uses $500 of Max's money to recruit five expert marksmen: the horsethief Keno; the giant Negro, Cassie; the one-armed Slater; the tubercular P. J.; and the one family man, Levi Morgan. Riding back to Mexico with Chris, the Americans become less mercenary when they observe the brutal treatment of the peasants; their journey is also marked by their encounters with a political prisoner's little boy--Emiliano Zapata--and a pretty peasant girl, Tina, who falls in love with P. J. When Lobero learns that Max did not buy guns with the $600, he refuses to allow his men to take part in Quintero's rescue. Realizing that he needs support, Chris frees a prison gang that includes Zapata's father and trains them in military tactics. Despite their superior marksmanship, Chris's men are outnumbered and their valiant effort to free Quintero appears doomed. But, at the last moment, 50 of Lobero's bandits, having slain their leader for his lack of patriotism, thunder into the prison grounds and turn the tide of battle. Of the original seven, only Chris and Levi Morgan remain; and, before riding home, they elect to donate the $600 to the peasants' ... +


In 19th-century Mexico, Federales capture Quintero, the revolutionary who has attempted to rally the many disorganized groups opposing the dictatorship of President Díaz. Before going to prison, Quintero gives his lieutenant, Maximiliano O'Leary, $600 with which to continue the cause. Bandit chief Carlos Lobero demands that the money be used for guns and ammunition, but Max instead seeks the help of the legendary Chris, an American renowned for his bravery and cunning. Chris agrees to attempt a rescue of Quintero and uses $500 of Max's money to recruit five expert marksmen: the horsethief Keno; the giant Negro, Cassie; the one-armed Slater; the tubercular P. J.; and the one family man, Levi Morgan. Riding back to Mexico with Chris, the Americans become less mercenary when they observe the brutal treatment of the peasants; their journey is also marked by their encounters with a political prisoner's little boy--Emiliano Zapata--and a pretty peasant girl, Tina, who falls in love with P. J. When Lobero learns that Max did not buy guns with the $600, he refuses to allow his men to take part in Quintero's rescue. Realizing that he needs support, Chris frees a prison gang that includes Zapata's father and trains them in military tactics. Despite their superior marksmanship, Chris's men are outnumbered and their valiant effort to free Quintero appears doomed. But, at the last moment, 50 of Lobero's bandits, having slain their leader for his lack of patriotism, thunder into the prison grounds and turn the tide of battle. Of the original seven, only Chris and Levi Morgan remain; and, before riding home, they elect to donate the $600 to the peasants' cause. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.