War Hunt (1962)

81 mins | Drama | March 1962

Director:

Denis Sanders

Producer:

Terry Sanders

Cinematographer:

Ted McCord

Production Designer:

Edgar Lansbury

Production Company:

T-D Enterprises
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HISTORY

The 30 Jun 1960 DV announced a two-picture deal between United Artists Corporation and the production team of Denis and Terry Sanders. The first of the two productions was War Hunt, from an original screenplay by Stanford Whitmore. Nearly five months later, the 21 Nov 1960 DV noted that the Sanders brothers were hoping to cast actor John Saxon, who was currently under contract to Warner Bros. Pictures. On 26 Jan 1961, DV revealed that Saxon was scheduled to begin rehearsals that day. Denis told the 31 Jan 1961 LAT that the film would offer "an acute sense of participation" by establishing "the geography of every sequence," allowing audiences to view scenes as if they were characters on screen. According to the 3 Feb 1961 DV, principal photography began two days earlier at the former Chaplin Studios, currently owned by comedian Red Skelton. Days into filming, the 7 Feb 1961 issue reported that director of photography Floyd Crosby withdrew from the project due to a prior commitment. He was replaced by Ted McCord. The 29 Mar 1961 DV revealed that the picture was completed in fifteen days on a budget of $275,000, and marked the screen debut of actor Robert Redford.
       War Hunt was first screened the following summer at a filmmakers' seminar in Montreal, Canada, as stated in the 9 Aug 1961 Var. Box office reports in the 7 Mar 1962 Var indicated a recent opening in Detroit, MI. Other openings followed in New York City on 7 ... More Less

The 30 Jun 1960 DV announced a two-picture deal between United Artists Corporation and the production team of Denis and Terry Sanders. The first of the two productions was War Hunt, from an original screenplay by Stanford Whitmore. Nearly five months later, the 21 Nov 1960 DV noted that the Sanders brothers were hoping to cast actor John Saxon, who was currently under contract to Warner Bros. Pictures. On 26 Jan 1961, DV revealed that Saxon was scheduled to begin rehearsals that day. Denis told the 31 Jan 1961 LAT that the film would offer "an acute sense of participation" by establishing "the geography of every sequence," allowing audiences to view scenes as if they were characters on screen. According to the 3 Feb 1961 DV, principal photography began two days earlier at the former Chaplin Studios, currently owned by comedian Red Skelton. Days into filming, the 7 Feb 1961 issue reported that director of photography Floyd Crosby withdrew from the project due to a prior commitment. He was replaced by Ted McCord. The 29 Mar 1961 DV revealed that the picture was completed in fifteen days on a budget of $275,000, and marked the screen debut of actor Robert Redford.
       War Hunt was first screened the following summer at a filmmakers' seminar in Montreal, Canada, as stated in the 9 Aug 1961 Var. Box office reports in the 7 Mar 1962 Var indicated a recent opening in Detroit, MI. Other openings followed in New York City on 7 Aug 1962 and on 7 Nov 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. In addition to generally positive notices, the film was voted one of the ten best English-language releases of 1962 by the National Board of Review. The 13 Mar 1963 Var quoted historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., who included War Hunt among the recent wave of films "designed for the taste of minority groups."
       In late Jul 1962, the picture was an official U.S. entry at the International Film Festival in Locarno, Switzerland, where it won the Golden Sail award, according to the 31 Jul 1962 DV. The 26 Feb 1964 Var reported that after screening at the London Film Festival, War Hunt was one of two finalists for the United Nations Award. The other was the British short subject, Inheritance (1963).
       An article in the 24 Jul 1963 Var implied that the film was a financial failure, but was credited with creating demand for the services of director-producer Denis Sanders.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Jun 1960
p. 1.
Daily Variety
21 Nov 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Jan 1961
p. 13.
Daily Variety
27 Jan 1961
p. 22.
Daily Variety
3 Feb 1961
p. 10.
Daily Variety
7 Feb 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 Jun 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
31 Jul 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
1 Feb 1963
p. 4.
Daily Variety
15 May 1963
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jan 1961
Section C, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
2 Nov 1962
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
9 Nov 1962
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jan 1963
Section L, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
4 Feb 1963
Section C, p. 8.
New York Times
7 Aug 1962
p. 34.
New York Times
8 Aug 1962
p. 28.
New York Times
22 Dec 1962
p. 5.
Variety
22 Feb 1961
p. 51.
Variety
9 Aug 1961
p. 15.
Variety
7 Mar 1962
p. 9.
Variety
27 Jun 1962
p. 9.
Variety
8 Aug 1962
p. 62.
Variety
13 Mar 1963
p. 7.
Variety
24 Jul 1963
p. 5.
Variety
26 Feb 1964
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Pictorial cont
Gaffer
Cam op
Key grip
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles des
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst prod
Tech adv
Scr supv
Prod asst
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1962
Premiere Information:
Detroit opening: early March 1962
New York opening: 7 August 1962
Los Angeles opening: 7 November 1962
Production Date:
1 February--mid February 1961
Copyright Claimant:
T-D Enterprises
Copyright Date:
9 February 1962
Copyright Number:
LP21772
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19992
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Each night during the fighting in Korea, U. S. A. Pvt. Raymond Endore blackens his face, sneaks into enemy territory, kills a Chinese Communist guard with his stiletto, and then performs a mock Indian war dance over the corpse. A loner among the other members of his platoon, Endore has as his only companion Charlie, an 8-year-old Korean war orphan. Endore's unhealthy influence on Charlie is challenged by a replacement, Pvt. Roy Loomis, and the two men engage in a bitter struggle to dominate him. When the cease-fire order arrives and the GI's start a mild celebration, Loomis sees Endore sneak away for his nightly ritual, and he notifies his superior, Captain Pratt. Together, they go in search of the now psychopathic Endore. They find him, with Charlie, holed up in a caved-in bunker. Endore attacks Pratt and Loomis with his stiletto, and Pratt has no choice but to shoot him. Little Charlie looks at Endore's lifeless body, claps his hands to his ears, and runs off into no man's ... +


Each night during the fighting in Korea, U. S. A. Pvt. Raymond Endore blackens his face, sneaks into enemy territory, kills a Chinese Communist guard with his stiletto, and then performs a mock Indian war dance over the corpse. A loner among the other members of his platoon, Endore has as his only companion Charlie, an 8-year-old Korean war orphan. Endore's unhealthy influence on Charlie is challenged by a replacement, Pvt. Roy Loomis, and the two men engage in a bitter struggle to dominate him. When the cease-fire order arrives and the GI's start a mild celebration, Loomis sees Endore sneak away for his nightly ritual, and he notifies his superior, Captain Pratt. Together, they go in search of the now psychopathic Endore. They find him, with Charlie, holed up in a caved-in bunker. Endore attacks Pratt and Loomis with his stiletto, and Pratt has no choice but to shoot him. Little Charlie looks at Endore's lifeless body, claps his hands to his ears, and runs off into no man's land. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Korean War


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.