The Patsy (1964)

101 mins | Comedy | 1964

Director:

Jerry Lewis

Cinematographer:

Wallace Kelley

Editor:

John Woodcock

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Cary Odell

Production Company:

Patti Enterprises
Full page view
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Jerry Lewis Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Haberdashery
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Boom op
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Casting
Dial coach
Stills
Prop
Gaffer
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Lost My Heart in a Drive-In Movie," words and music by David Raksin and Jack Brooks.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Schnook
Release Date:
1964
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 8 July 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Patti Enterprises
Copyright Date:
11 June 1964
Copyright Number:
LP28699
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
101
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A famous singer dies in a plane accident, and his management team--producer Caryl Fergusson, writer Chic Wymore, press agent Harry Silver, director Morgan Heywood, valet Bruce Alden, and secretary Ellen Betz--decides to make an unknown into a star. They pick Stanley Belt, a shy bellboy, whose nervous bumbling is mistaken for comic ability. Despite singing and acting lessons, Stanley is extremely nervous, and a recording session and nightclub tryout are disastrous. However, a publicity campaign gains him an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, but his management team--with the exception of Ellen, who loves him--abandons him before he goes on. Contrary to the team's expectations, Stanley is a hit on the show. He later forgives the others because they made him a star; he gives each back his old job and proposes to ... +


A famous singer dies in a plane accident, and his management team--producer Caryl Fergusson, writer Chic Wymore, press agent Harry Silver, director Morgan Heywood, valet Bruce Alden, and secretary Ellen Betz--decides to make an unknown into a star. They pick Stanley Belt, a shy bellboy, whose nervous bumbling is mistaken for comic ability. Despite singing and acting lessons, Stanley is extremely nervous, and a recording session and nightclub tryout are disastrous. However, a publicity campaign gains him an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show, but his management team--with the exception of Ellen, who loves him--abandons him before he goes on. Contrary to the team's expectations, Stanley is a hit on the show. He later forgives the others because they made him a star; he gives each back his old job and proposes to Ellen. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.