Robby (1968)

91 mins | Melodrama | 1968

Director:

Ralph C. Bluemke

Cinematographer:

Al Mozell

Editor:

Bill Buckley

Production Company:

Bluewood Films
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HISTORY

Filmed on location in Puerto Rico and ... More Less

Filmed on location in Puerto Rico and Connecticut. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Exec asst
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 August 1968
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color, print by Movielab
Duration(in mins):
91
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A National Geographic writer and his wife place their 8-year-old son, Robby, in a tiny lifeboat before perishing in stormy seas. After being washed up on the shore of a lush tropical island, Robby attempts to apply the knowledge of self-survival taught him by his nature-loving parents. He appears doomed despite his valiant efforts, until he spies a black boy his age, who was banished with his now-deceased mother to the island years before by a wrathful tribal chief. Terrified by the stranger, Robby remains guarded even after the boy saves him from drowning. Eventually, however, they become friends, and Robby names him "Friday" to commemorate the day they met. Robby soon discovers that the civilized ways he tries to teach Friday are not as practical as Friday's ways. Together they enjoy many idyllic days and adventures until Horton Crandall, a drunken beachcomber, lands on their island in a battered little boat. The next day Crandall, a writer, recognizes Robby from newspaper photographs. He tells Robby that his wealthy aunt and uncle, Janet and Lloyd Woodruff, have offered a reward for information about the boy and takes Robby, and also Friday, back to the States in his leaky boat. Arriving at the aunt's estate, Crandall speaks glowingly of the boys to the aunt, who assures him that the boys will be allowed to remain together. But when Robby's uncle, a fortune hunter, arrives home and sees the situation, he persuades his wife to place Friday in an adoption agency. There, Lloyd Woodruff reasons, a black family can adopt him. Thus disposed of, Friday will no longer threaten the Woodruffs' social standing. When a man from the orphanage ... +


A National Geographic writer and his wife place their 8-year-old son, Robby, in a tiny lifeboat before perishing in stormy seas. After being washed up on the shore of a lush tropical island, Robby attempts to apply the knowledge of self-survival taught him by his nature-loving parents. He appears doomed despite his valiant efforts, until he spies a black boy his age, who was banished with his now-deceased mother to the island years before by a wrathful tribal chief. Terrified by the stranger, Robby remains guarded even after the boy saves him from drowning. Eventually, however, they become friends, and Robby names him "Friday" to commemorate the day they met. Robby soon discovers that the civilized ways he tries to teach Friday are not as practical as Friday's ways. Together they enjoy many idyllic days and adventures until Horton Crandall, a drunken beachcomber, lands on their island in a battered little boat. The next day Crandall, a writer, recognizes Robby from newspaper photographs. He tells Robby that his wealthy aunt and uncle, Janet and Lloyd Woodruff, have offered a reward for information about the boy and takes Robby, and also Friday, back to the States in his leaky boat. Arriving at the aunt's estate, Crandall speaks glowingly of the boys to the aunt, who assures him that the boys will be allowed to remain together. But when Robby's uncle, a fortune hunter, arrives home and sees the situation, he persuades his wife to place Friday in an adoption agency. There, Lloyd Woodruff reasons, a black family can adopt him. Thus disposed of, Friday will no longer threaten the Woodruffs' social standing. When a man from the orphanage comes for Friday, Robby desperately, but futilely, tries to prevent him from taking his friend. Perplexed as to why he and Friday cannot remain together, Robby tearfully watches as Friday is taken away. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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