Barquero (1970)

GP | 108 mins | Western | 15 May 1970

Director:

Gordon Douglas

Producer:

Hal Klein

Cinematographer:

Gerald Finnerman

Editor:

Charles Nelson

Production Designer:

Allen E. Smith

Production Company:

Aubrey Schenck Enterprises
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HISTORY

Based on real-life incidents that took place in the 1870s in the Arizona Territory, Barquero was originally planned as a “big budget western for Paramount Pictures,” according to a 1 Mar 1966 DV brief, which named Aubrey Schenck and Hal Klein as producers. Filming was scheduled to begin on the Paramount studio lot in summer 1966, as noted in the 4 Mar 1966 LAT and 4 Apr 1966 DV, and Hugh O’Brian was cast in a leading role, the 3 May 1966 DV reported.
       More than a year after the project was first announced, an item in the 17 Jul 1967 LAT stated that Aubrey Schenck had recently signed a four-picture deal with United Artists (UA), and Barquero was slated to be the second of his four films for the company. Principal photography was scheduled to begin later that year in the Colorado River area. However, shooting had not yet begun when the 19 Dec 1968 DV announced that Lee Van Cleef had been cast in the starring role. Van Cleef’s salary was reported as $350,000 in the 26 Mar 1969 LAT, although a later item in the 12 Jun 1969 DV noted that he would be paid $300,000 “plus a percentage.” A few months after Van Cleef joined the project, Robert Sparr was brought on to direct, according to the 16 Apr 1969 DV, which also announced that Warren Oates and Forrest Tucker would co-star.
       In addition to location filming in and around Colorado, production was initially scheduled to take place on rented soundstages ... More Less

Based on real-life incidents that took place in the 1870s in the Arizona Territory, Barquero was originally planned as a “big budget western for Paramount Pictures,” according to a 1 Mar 1966 DV brief, which named Aubrey Schenck and Hal Klein as producers. Filming was scheduled to begin on the Paramount studio lot in summer 1966, as noted in the 4 Mar 1966 LAT and 4 Apr 1966 DV, and Hugh O’Brian was cast in a leading role, the 3 May 1966 DV reported.
       More than a year after the project was first announced, an item in the 17 Jul 1967 LAT stated that Aubrey Schenck had recently signed a four-picture deal with United Artists (UA), and Barquero was slated to be the second of his four films for the company. Principal photography was scheduled to begin later that year in the Colorado River area. However, shooting had not yet begun when the 19 Dec 1968 DV announced that Lee Van Cleef had been cast in the starring role. Van Cleef’s salary was reported as $350,000 in the 26 Mar 1969 LAT, although a later item in the 12 Jun 1969 DV noted that he would be paid $300,000 “plus a percentage.” A few months after Van Cleef joined the project, Robert Sparr was brought on to direct, according to the 16 Apr 1969 DV, which also announced that Warren Oates and Forrest Tucker would co-star.
       In addition to location filming in and around Colorado, production was initially scheduled to take place on rented soundstages at the Warner Bros.--Seven Arts, Inc. studio lot in Burbank, CA. An article the 28 Jan 1970 Var stated that interior filming was ultimately done on sets built in Colorado, although Dominic Frontiere’s score was recorded, with a forty-seven-piece orchestra, at Warner Bros.—Seven Arts, as noted in the 16 Dec 1969 DV.
       Days prior to the anticipated 15 Jul 1969 start of principal photography, a pilot named George McCormick was killed in a plane crash during a location scout near Canon City, CO. Director Robert Sparr and director of photography Gerald Finnerman were injured in the crash. The 12 Jul 1969 LAT reported that Sparr had suffered a broken ankle and was taken to a Colorado Springs, CO, hospital, while Finnerman was taken to a hospital in Canon City “for observation.” The 14 Jul 1969 DV gave an updated report that Sparr had endured fractures to his ankle and legs and would have to be replaced by Gordon Douglas. The following day, DV stated that Finnerman would also leave the project, to be replaced by Dale Deverman. On 18 Jul 1969, DV reported that Finnerman would, in fact, return to the project on 28 Jul 1969; thus, Deverman would only act as director of photography for the first week of filming.
       By 15 Jul 1969, Sparr’s condition had become “critical,” as noted in DV. The director remained in the Colorado Springs hospital until his death on 28 Aug 1969. The 3 Sep 1969 Var obituary for Sparr noted that he was fifty-seven years old at the time of his passing.
       Principal photography commenced on 22 Jul 1969, as stated in a 25 Jul 1969 DV production chart. While filming was underway, the 6 Aug 1969 DV announced that a runaway wagon used in a scene had destroyed $5,000 worth of Arriflex camera equipment, and shortly after, the 15 Aug 1969 LAT reported that Lee Van Cleef had sprained an ankle off camera, while assisting an actress who had fallen into water. A “day of appreciation” for the film’s cast and crew, set to include a golf tournament and cocktail party, was organized by the Chambers of Commerce of Canon City and Florence, CO, and scheduled to take place on 24 Aug 1969, according to the 22 Aug 1969 DV. Filming was completed by early Sep 1969, as noted in the 10 Sep 1969 DV. The film’s final budget was listed as $2.4 million, and it was noted that the picture would be released on 70mm.
       Domestic release was scheduled for summer 1970, although, as stated in a 28 Jan 1970 Var item, the picture was set to debut around the Easter holiday in some European territories as well as Japan. Over Easter week, Barquero became one of the top-ten highest-grossing pictures in Milan, Italy, the 8 Apr 1970 DV reported. In the U.S., the film had regional openings beginning in mid-May 1970, in cities including Dallas, TX, Kansas City, MO, and Baltimore, MD. On 14 May 1970, DV reported that Scheck and cast members Warren Oates and Marie Gomez helped the local Red Cross with a tornado relief effort while promoting the film in Lubbock, TX, where they also arranged free screenings of Barquero.
       Critical reception was mixed. A review in the 15 May 1970 DV called Barquero “not a good film, but… a very good bad one,” and noted that a scene showing Oates’s character smoking marijuana was inconsistent with the 1870s time period.
       According to a box-office chart in the 21 Oct 1970 Var, the picture grossed $244,331 in its first four weeks of domestic release in thirty-two theaters. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1966
p. 1.
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
3 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1967
p. 1.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1968
p. 31.
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
16 Apr 1969
p. 22.
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Jun 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1969
p. 1.
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1969
p. 4.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1969
p. 6.
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
22 Aug 1969
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Sep 1969
p. 2.
Daily Variety
16 Dec 1969
p. 15.
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1970
p. 16.
Daily Variety
14 May 1970
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 May 1970
p. 3, 13.
Los Angeles Times
4 Mar 1966
Section C, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1967
Section C, p. 23.
Los Angeles Times
26 Mar 1969
Section H, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1969
p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1969
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
29 Aug 1969
Section B, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
30 Oct 1970
Section I, p. 19.
New York Times
4 Sep 1970
p. 17.
Variety
3 Sep 1969
p. 73.
Variety
28 Jan 1970
p. 7, 78.
Variety
21 Oct 1970
p. 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Aubrey Schenck Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Cam op
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Cam asst
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Props
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Stills
Ch elec
Wrangler
First aid man
1st company grip
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 May 1970
Premiere Information:
Dallas opening: 15 May 1970
New York opening: week of 4 September 1970
Los Angeles opening: week of 30 October 1970
Production Date:
22 July--late August or early September 1969
Copyright Claimant:
Aubrey Schenck Enterprises
Copyright Date:
15 May 1970
Copyright Number:
LP38059
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
GP
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
22380
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jake Remy's marauders attack and loot the town of Buckskin, Arizona. Anxious to cross the Paria River into Mexico, three of the bandits enter the town of Lonely Dell, intending to commandeer the ferry operated by Travis. Taken prisoner, the ferryboat captain is rescued by Mountain Phil. Killing two of the bandits, Travis and Mountain Phil keep the third as a hostage. Arriving in Lonely Dell, Remy learns that Travis has transported the town's population to the other side of the river. Although Remy offers booty for passage, Travis refuses. Unaware that Lonely Dell is occupied by the band, villager Roland, hunting during the town's evacuation, falls into Remy's hands. When the bandit offers to exchange Roland for use of the ferry, Travis refuses, despite the sexual favors promised by the hostage's wife. That night, however, Travis and Mountain Phil swim the Paria, stampede Remy's horses, and rescue Roland. The hostage's wife then honors the agreement. Desperate, the band builds a raft and crosses the river. In midstream the barque is intercepted by Travis' ferry. On board are the townspeople, who slaughter the ... +


Jake Remy's marauders attack and loot the town of Buckskin, Arizona. Anxious to cross the Paria River into Mexico, three of the bandits enter the town of Lonely Dell, intending to commandeer the ferry operated by Travis. Taken prisoner, the ferryboat captain is rescued by Mountain Phil. Killing two of the bandits, Travis and Mountain Phil keep the third as a hostage. Arriving in Lonely Dell, Remy learns that Travis has transported the town's population to the other side of the river. Although Remy offers booty for passage, Travis refuses. Unaware that Lonely Dell is occupied by the band, villager Roland, hunting during the town's evacuation, falls into Remy's hands. When the bandit offers to exchange Roland for use of the ferry, Travis refuses, despite the sexual favors promised by the hostage's wife. That night, however, Travis and Mountain Phil swim the Paria, stampede Remy's horses, and rescue Roland. The hostage's wife then honors the agreement. Desperate, the band builds a raft and crosses the river. In midstream the barque is intercepted by Travis' ferry. On board are the townspeople, who slaughter the marauders. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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